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Full text of "Bulletin of Wake Forest University"

2007-2008 

The Undergraduate Schools 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hil 



http://archive.org/details/bulletinofwakefo20072008 



New Series 

June 2007 

Volume 102, Numbers 




THE UNDERGRADUATE SCHOOLS 



Wake Forest University 

and the Wayne Calloway School of Business and Accountancy 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 2007/2008 

www.wfu.edu 



BULLETIN of Wake Forest University (USPS 078-320) is published seven times a year in February, 
April, June (2 issues), July (2 issues), and August by the Office of Creative Services, Wake Forest Uni- 
versity, PO Box 7205 (1834 Wake Forest Road), Winston-Salem, NC 27109-7205. Periodicals postage 
paid at Winston-Salem, NC, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: 
BULLETIN of Wake Forest University, Director of Admissions, PO. Box 7305, Winston-Salem, NC 
27109-7305. 



,.i!^% The Academic Calendar 

^"Y- "nB^ -^'*.5 

Fall semester 2007 




August 23 
August 24-27 
August 25-26 
August 27-28 
August 29 


Thursday 

Friday-Monday 

Saturday-Sunday 

Monday-Tuesday 

Wednesday 


Move-in day for new students* 

Orientation for new students 

Residence halls open for returning students' 

Check in/Registration 

Classes begin 


September 
September 12 


(date to be announced) 
Wednesday 


Opening Convocation 
Last day to add courses** 


October 3 
October 21 
October 19 


Wednesday 

Sunday 

Friday 


Last day to drop courses** 
Midterm grades due 
Fall break 


November 21-25 
November 26 


Wednesday-Sunday 
Monday 


Thanksgiving holiday* 
Classes resume 


December 7 
December 8 
December 10-15 
December 15 
Dec. 16-Jan. 12 


Friday 
Saturday 

Monday-Saturday 
Saturday 


Classes end 

Reading day 

Examinations 

All residence halls close* 

Winter recess 



Spring semester 2008 



January 12 


Saturday 


Residence halls open* 


January 13-14 


Sunday-Monday 


Orientation for new students 
Residence halls open* 


January 15 


Tuesday 


Check in/Registration 


January 16 


Wednesday 


Classes begin 


January 21 


Monday 


Martin Luther King Jr. Day — no classes 


January 30 


Wednesday 


Last day to add courses** 


February 


(date to be announced) 


Founders' Day Convocation 


February 20 


Wednesday 


Last day to drop courses** 


March 9 


Sunday 


Midterm grades due 


March 8-16 


Saturday-Sunday 


Spring break* 


March 17 


Monday 


Classes resume 


March 21 


Friday 


Good Friday — no classes 


April 30 


Wednesday 


Classes end 


Mayl 


Thursday 


Reading Day 


May 2-3 


Friday-Saturday 


Examinations 


May 5-8 


Monday-Thursday 


Examinations* 


May 18 


Simday 


Baccalaureate 


May 19 


Monday 


Commencement* 



Consult Residence Life and Housing for schedule of opening and closing times. 

For courses taught in less than the full tenet's duration (e.g., 7.5 week classes), proportional drop 

and add deadlines will be in effect. 



Table of Contents 



The University 6 

Buildings and Grounds 7 

Information Systems 8 

Libraries 10 

Recognition and Accreditation 11 

The Undergraduate Schools 11 

Wake Forest College 1 3 

Statement of Purpose 13 

Honor System 14 

Summary of Computing Rights and Responsibilities 15 

Student Complaints 16 

History and Development 17 

Procedures 19 

Admission /Application 19 

Early Decision 20 

Admission of Students with Disabilities 20 

Advanced Placement and CLEP 20 

Admission of Transfer Students 20 

Student Health Information Svunmary Form/Immunization Policy 21 

Expenses 22 

Dining Choices 23 

Refunds 24 

Housing 27 

Off-Campus Housing Policy 27 

Student Health Service 27 

Orientation and Advising 28 

Registration 28 

Classification 29 

Part-time Students 29 

Class Attendance 29 

Auditing Courses 30 

Dropping a Course 30 

Drop/add of Partial-semester Courses 30 

Witiidrawal 30 

Examinations 31 

Grading 31 

Dean's List 32 

Repetition of Courses 32 

Probation 32 

Requirements for Continuation 33 

Requirements for Readmission 33 

Summer Study 34 

Transfer Credit 34 

Independent Study, Individual Study, Directed Reading and Internships 35 

Eligibility for Study Abroad 35 

Scholarships and Loans 36 

Policy on Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid Eligibility 36 

Institutional Financial Aid/Federal Financial Aid 36 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Scholarships 38 

Federal Financial Aid Programs 54 

Exchange Programs and Scholarships 55 

Loans 55 

Other Aid Programs 55 

Outside Assistance 56 

Special Programs 57 

International 58 

Center for International Studies 58 

International Students 58 

Foreign Area Studies 58 

Opportunities for Study Abroad in Wake Forest Programs 58 

Study Abroad in Non-Wake Forest Programs 60 

Requirements for Degrees 61 

Degrees Offered 61 

General Requirements 61 

Core Requirements 62 

Basic Requirements 62 

Foreign Language Placement 62 

Divisional Requirements 63 

Additional Requirements 64 

Requirement in Health and Exercise Science 64 

Proficiency in the Use of English 64 

Declaring a Major 64 

Maximum Number of Courses in a Department 65 

Options for Meeting Major Requirements 65 

Double Majors/Minors 66 

Foreign Area Studies 66 

Senior Testing 66 

Combined Degrees in Medical Technology 67 

Degrees in Engineering 67 

Five-year Cooperative Degree Program in Latin-American Studies 67 

Courses of Instruction/Wake Forest College 69 

American Ethnic Studies 70 

Anthropology 72 

Art 76 

Biology 83 

Chemistry 90 

Classical Languages 94 

Communication 98 

Computer Science 103 

Counseling 107 

Cultural Resource Preservation 107 

Early Christian Studies 108 

East Asian Languages and Cultures (Chinese /Japanese) 109 

East Asian Studies 114 

Economics 115 

Education 119 

English 125 

Entrepreneurship and Social Enterprise 132 

Environmental Program 135 

Film Studies 138 

German and Russian 139 

Global Trade and Commerce Studies 144 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Health and Exercise Science 145 

Health Policy and Administration 149 

History 150 

Humanities 157 

Interdisciplinary Honors 162 

International Development and Policy 164 

International Studies 165 

Italian Studies 170 

Journalism 172 

Languages Across the Curriculum 173 

La tin- American Studies 174 

Linguistics 176 

Mathematics 178 

Medieval Studies 183 

Middle East and South Asia Studies 184 

Military Science 185 

Music 187 

Neuroscience 194 

Philosophy 195 

Physics 199 

Political Science 203 

Psychology 210 

Religion 214 

Romance Languages 222 

Russian and East European Studies 239 

Sociology 240 

Spanish Studies 244 

Theatre and Dance 244 

Urban Studies 251 

Women's and Gender Studies 252 

Other Courses 255 

Wayne Calloway School of Business and Accountancy 256 

Mission 257 

Accreditation 257 

Programs and Majors 257 

Admission 258 

Transfer of Credit 259 

Requirements for Continuation /Requirements for Graduation 260 

Senior Honors Program 261 

Beta Gamma Sigma, National Honor Society 261 

Courses of Instruction 261 

Undergraduate Faculties 269 

Emeriti 293 

Committees of the Faculty 298 

Enrollment 301 

Board of Trustees 302 

Board of Visitors 303 

Board of Visitors/Calloway School 304 

Administration 305 

Index 318 

Notes 323 

Bulletins of Wake Forest 328 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



The University 






WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY IS 
CHARACTERIZED BY ITS DEVOTION TO 
LIBERAL LEARNING AND PROFESSIONAL 
PREPARATION FOR MEN AND WOMEN, 
ITS STRONG SENSE OF COMMUNITY AND 
FELLOWSHIP, AND ITS ENCOURAGEMENT 
OF FREE INQUIRY AND EXPRESSION. 



Wake Forest Institute was founded in 1834 
by the Baptist State Convention of North 
Carolina. The school opened its doors on 
February 3 with Samuel Wait as principal. 
Classes were first held in a farmhouse on the 
Calvin Jones plantation in Wake County, 
North Carolina, near which the village of 
Wake Forest later developed. 

Rechartered in 1838 as Wake Forest College, 
Wake Forest is one of the oldest institutions 
of higher learning in the state. The School of 
Law was established in 1894, followed by a 
two-year medical school in 1902. Wake Forest 
was exclusively a college for men until World 
War II, when women were admitted for the 
first time. 

In 1941 the medical school moved to 
Winston-Salem to become affiliated with 
North Carolina Baptist Hospital and was 
renamed the Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine. In 1946 the trustees of Wake Forest 
and the Baptist State Convention of North 
Carolina accepted a proposal by the Z. Smith 
Reynolds Foundation to relocate the College 
to Winston-Salem. The late Charles and Mary 
Reynolds Babcock donated much of the R.J. 
Reynolds family estate as the site for the 



campus and building funds were received 
from many sources. From 1952 to 1956, the 
first fourteen buildings were constructed in 
Georgian style on the new campus. The move 
to Winston-Salem took place in the summer of 
1956; the original, or "old" campus, is now 
home to Southeastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary. 

Following the move. Wake Forest grew con- 
siderably in enrollment, programs, and stature 
and became a University in 1967. The School 
of Business Administration, first established 
in 1948, was named the Charles H. Babcock 
School of Business Administration in 1969 and 
admitted its first graduate students in 1971. 
In 1972 the school enrolled only graduate 
students and the name was changed to the 
Babcock Graduate School of Management; 
departments of business and accountancy and 
economics were established in the CoUege. In 
1980 the Department of Business and Accoun- 
tancy was reconstituted as the School of Busi- 
ness and Accountancy; the name was changed 
to the Wayne Calloway School of Business and 
Accountancy in 1995. 

The Division of Graduate Studies, estab- 
lished in 1961, is now organized as the Gradu- 
ate School and encompasses advanced work 
in the arts and sciences on both the Reynolda 
and Bowman Gray campuses. In 1997 the 
medical school was renamed the Wake Forest 
University School of Medicine; its campus is 
now known as the Bowman Gray Campus. 
The Divinity School was established in 1999. 



THE UNIVERSITY 



Wake Forest honors its Baptist heritage in 
word and deed. The University will fulfill the 
opportunities for service arising out of that 
heritage. Governance is now by an indepen- 
dent Board of Trustees; there are advisory 
boards of visitors for the College and each 
professional school. A joint board of Universi- 
ty trustees and trustees of the North Carolina 
Baptist Hospital is responsible for Wake Forest 
University Baptist Medical Center, which 
includes the hospital and the medical school. 

The College, Wayne Calloway School of 
Business and Accountancy, Babcock Gradu- 
ate School of Management, School of Law, the 
Graduate School, and the Divinity School are 
located on the Reynolda Campus in northwest 
Winston-Salem. The Wake Forest School of 
Medicine is about four miles away, near the 
city's downtown. The University also offers 
instruction regularly at Casa Artom in Venice, 
at Worrell House in London, at Flow House in 
Vienna, and in other places around the world. 

The College offers courses in more than 
forty fields of study leading to the baccalau- 
reate degree. The Wayne Calloway School 
of Business and Accountancy offers courses 
of study leading to baccalaureate degrees in 
business, finance, or mathematical business 
(in cooperation with the Department of Math- 
ematics). The Divinity School offers the master 
of divinity degree. 

The School of Law offers the juris doctor 
and master of laws in American law degrees, 
and the Babcock Graduate School of Manage- 
ment, the master of business administration 
and the master of art in management degrees. 
Both schools also offer a joint JD/MBA degree. 

In addition to the doctor of medicine 
degree, the Wake Forest School of Medicine 
offers, through the Graduate School, programs 
leading to the master of science and doctor of 
philosophy degrees in biomedical sciences. 
The School of Medicine and the Babcock 
School offer a joint MD/MBA program. 

The Graduate School confers the master 
of arts, master of arts in education, master of 
arts in liberal studies, and master of science 



degrees in the arts and sciences and the doctor 
of philosophy degree in biology, chemistry, 
and physics. The Graduate School also offers 
MD/PhD and PhD/MBA programs. 

Buildings and Grounds 

The Reynolda Campus of Wake Forest is situ- 
ated on approximately 340 acres; its physical 
facilities consist of over thirty buildings, most 
of which are of modified Georgian architec- 
ture and constructed of Old Virginia brick 
trimmed in granite and limestone. The main 
Quadrangle, Heam Plaza, is named for Wake 
Forest's twelfth president, Thomas K. Heam 
Jr., who served from 1983 to 2005. Manchester 
Plaza, named for benefactors and Wake For- 
est parents Doug and Elizabeth Manchester, 
is located on south campus. The Reynolda 
Gardens annex, consisting of about 150 acres 
and including Reynolda Woods, Reynolda Vil- 
lage, Reynolda Gardens, and Reynolda House 
Museum of American Art, is adjacent to the 
campus. The Graylyn International Confer- 
ence Center is nearby. 

Wait Chapel, named in memory of the first 
president of the College, seats 2,300. The 
Wait Chapel tower contains the Janet Jeffrey 
Carlisle Harris Carillon, an instrument of 
forty-eight bells. Wingate Hall, named in honor 
of President Washington Manly Wingate, 
houses the Department of Religion, the Divin- 
ity School, and the offices of the University 
chaplain and Wake Forest Baptist Church. 
Reynolda Hall, across the upper plaza from 
Wait Chapel, houses most of the administra- 
tive offices for the Reynolda Campus. The 
Benson University Center is the central hub for 
student activities and events. The Z. Smith 
Reynolds Library and its Edwin Graves Wilson 
Wing house the main collection of books and 
documents on the Rejmolda Campus. Along 
with eight floors of open stacks, it has reading 
and reference rooms for study. Carswell Hall 
houses the Departments of Communication, 
Economics, and Sociology, and a large multi- 
media lecture area, the Annenberg Forum. 



THE UNIVERSITY 



Winston Hall houses the biology department; 
Salem Hall, the chemistry department. Both 
buildings have laboratories as well as class- 
rooms and special research facilities. The Olin 
Physical Laboratory houses the physics depart- 
ment. Harold W. Tribble Hall accommodates 
primarily humanities departments and the 
women's and gender studies program, and 
has seminar rooms, a philosophy library, and 
a multimedia lecture area, DeTamble Audito- 
rium. The Museum of Anthropology houses the 
anthropology department and North Caroli- 
na's only museum dedicated to the study of 
world cultures. The Wayne Calloway School of 
Business and Accountancy is located in Kirby 
Hall, and the Departments of Mathematics and 
Computer Science are in adjacent Manchester 
Hall. William B. Greene Jr. Hall houses psychol- 
ogy, German and Russian, and Romance 
languages. 

The James R. Scales Fine Arts Center is of contem- 
porary design appropriate to the functions of 
studio art, theatre, musical and dance perfor- 
mances, and instruction in art history, drama, 
and music. Off its lobby is the Charlotte and 
Philip Hanes Gallery for special exhibitions. In 
the art wing are spacious studios for drawing, 
painting, sculpture, and printmaking, along 
with a smaller gallery and classrooms. In the 
theatre wing are design and production areas 
and two technically complete theatres, the 
larger of traditional proscenium design and 
the smaller for experimental ring productions. 
The music wing contains Brendle Recital Hall 
for concerts and lectures, classrooms, practice 
rooms for individuals and groups, and the 
offices of the music department. 

The Worrell Professional Center for Law and 
Management houses the School of Law and 
the Babcock Graduate School of Management 
under one roof. 

The William N. Reynolds Gymnasium has class- 
rooms for instruction in health and exercise 
science, courts for indoor sports, a swimming 
pool, and offices for the Department of Health 



and Exercise Science and Student Health Ser- 
vice. Adjacent are tennis courts, sports fields, 
Kentner Stadium, the Manchester Athletic Center, 
and the Kenneth D. Miller Center. 

The Information Systems Building houses the 
information systems and military science 
departments, as well as a University Stores 
annex and a food service area. 

The Wake Forest campus has a wide variety of 
housing options available to students. Babcock 
Hall, Bostwick Hall, Collins Hall, Davis Hall, 
Efird Hall, Huffman Hall, Johnson Hall, Kitchin 
Hall, Luter Hall, Martin Hall, Palmer Hall, 
Piccolo Hall, Polo Hall, Poteat Hall, the Student 
Apartments, and Taylor Hall are coeducational 
by floor, wing, or apartment. Substance-free 
living environments are available in some 
residence halls. Student housing is also avail- 
able in the townhouse apartments and several 
small houses owned by the University. On the 
edge of the main campus are apartments for 
faculty and staff. 

Information Systems 

Information Systems supports the instruction, 
research, and administrative needs of the 
Reynolda Campus of Wake Forest University. 
The campus computer network offers high- 
speed wired and wireless connectivity from all 
campus buildings. 

Upon enrollment, all undergraduate 
students receive a computer equipped with 
wireless connectivity and a color printer. At 
the beginning of the junior year, students ex- 
change the computer for a new model. Upon 
graduation, the computer and the printer 
become the property of the student. 

The computers contain a standard suite of 
powerful programs that allow students easy 
access to research and class materials and offer 
the ability to interact with faculty, staff, and 
other students through the campus network. 
Software programs include Microsoft Office, 
Adobe Acrobat and digital media tools, and 
e-mail and Internet applications like Mozilla 



THE UNIVERSITY g 



and Macromedia Dreamweaver. A large vari- 
ety of instructional, classroom, and research 
resources are also available on the computer. 
These include the online catalog, databases, 
and electronic journals provided by the Z. 
Smith Reynolds Library 

Information Systems maintains an exten- 
sive array of online information systems 
that support University admissions, student 
registration, grade processing, payroll admin- 
istration, accounting services, and many other 
administrative and academic applications. 
In addition, the Wake Forest Information 
Network (WIN) provides the University 
community with features like faculty, staff, 
and student directories; an alumni direc- 
tory and career networking service; online 
class registration; and vehicle registration. 

Students also have access to computing 
resources outside the University. The Uni- 
versity is a member of the Inter-University 
Consortium for Political and Social Research 
(ICPSR), located at the University of Michigan. 
Membership in ICPSR provides faculty and 
students with access to a large library of data 
files, including public opinion surveys, cross- 
cultural data, financial data, and complete 
census data. The University is also a member 
of EDUCAUSE, a national consortium of 
colleges and universities concerned with com- 
puting issues. 

The University has an extensive collection 
of computing facilities serving both academic 
and business needs. An extensive set of 
LINUX and Windows-based systems provide 
for business, messaging, systems manage- 
ment, Internet, intianet, courseware, research, 
and file and print services for the University. 
A 214-node LINUX supercomputing cluster 
provides supercomputing services for physics, 
biotechnology, mathematics, computer science, 
and other scientific research. These systems 
are available to students, faculty, and staff 
24 hours a day through the Wake Forest 
University network or other ISP connectivity. 
All connections are protected by VPN and 
firewalls. 



Wake Forest's network infrastructure in- 
cludes a gigabit Ethernet backbone, 100 mega- 
bit switched connectivity to the desktop, and 
pervasive, 802.11a/g wireless connectivity in 
all campus buildings. Wake Forest has a giga- 
bit Ethernet connection to the Winston-Salem 
RPOP (regional point of presence) for Inter- 
net access. This RPOP connects the Universi- 
ty to the North Carolina Research and Educa- 
tion Network (NCREN), the Internet service 
provider for the majority of North Carolina 
colleges and universities. Through this con- 
nection. Wake Forest has access to addition- 
al extensive supercomputing facilities located 
throughout the state of North Carolina as well 
as access to all the premiere research networks 
in the world, including Internet II and the Na- 
tional Lambda Rail. Wake Forest works closely 
with NCREN on other advanced network and 
Internet technologies. 

Information Systems also provides tele- 
phone and cable television services to the stu- 
dents, faculty, and staff of Wake Forest Uni- 
versity. All residence hall rooms are equipped 
with telephone jacks and cable TV connec- 
tions. Local dial service for the campus and 
Winston-Salem area is provided as part of the 
housing package. Students who reside in cam- 
pus housing receive personal security codes 
for dialing long-distance calls, which are billed 
to them each month. 

Cable television, while providing a recrea- 
tional outlet, plays an important role by pro- 
viding access to campus information and edu- 
cational offerings. Cable channel 2 is the Wake 
Forest Information Systems channel, which 
provides updated information on campus 
technology. Help Desk hours, and the status of 
various technology services. Cable channel 6 is 
student-run WAKE-TV, which features various 
student programming. Channels 20 and 22 
carry SCOLA and SCOLA2, nonprofit educa- 
tional services that feature television program- 
ming from more than 50 different countries in 
their original languages. Information Systems 
also offers select HDTV channels to students 
in residence halls. 



THE UNIVERSITY 



Information Systems provides assistance 
online at http://help.wfu.edu, by telephone 
at xHELP (x4357), and supports walk-in 
customers in room 256 of the Information 
Systems Building from 8 a.m. until 7 p.m. 
Monday through Thursday; 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. 
on Friday; and 3-7 p.m. on Sunday. A satellite 
Help Desk location in the Z. Smith Reynolds 
Library provides convenient access to self-help 
resources and on-site staff from 7-9 p.m., Mon- 
day through Thursday. A voice mail retrieval 
system is activated on weekends and during 
hoUday breaks to respond to emergency calls. 
On-site computing support in residence halls 
is available from Resident Technology Advi- 
sors (xRTAS). 

Libraries 

The libraries of Wake Forest University sup- 
port instruction and research at the under- 
graduate level and in the disciplines awarding 
graduate degrees. The libraries of the Univer- 
sity hold membership in the Association of 
College and Research Libraries and in the 
Association of Southeastern Research Librar- 
ies. They rank among the top libraries in the 
Southeast in expenditures per student. 

The Wake Forest University libraries in- 
clude the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, the Pro- 
fessional Center Library (serving the School 
of Law and the Babcock Graduate School of 
Management), and the Coy C. Carpenter 
Library of the Wake Forest University School 
of Medicine. The three libraries maintain col- 
lections totaling over 1.9 million volumes and 
subscriptions to nearly 35,000 print and elec- 
tronic serials. The Z. Smith Reynolds Library 
holds over L4 million volumes in the gen- 
eral collection, over 1 million reels of micro- 
film and pieces of microtext, and nearly 25,000 
media items. As a congressionally-designated 
selective federal depository and depository of 
North Carolina government information, the Z. 
Smith Reynolds Library holds nearly 170,000 
government documents. The Professional Cen- 
ter Library holds almost 200,000 volumes and 
is open to undergraduates with research needs 



for its collection. The Coy C. Carpenter Library 
holds over 150,000 volumes. 

The Wake Forest libraries share an online 
catalog that lists the libraries' holdings and 
provides access to electronic resources, data- 
bases, and an extensive collection of electronic 
journals, all accessible via the campus network 
and remotely. 

The Z. Smith Reynolds Library provides 
comprehensive reference and research ser- 
vices including assistance with directed and 
independent research and online searching; 
discipline-related library instruction; informa- 
tion literacy classes; general library orienta- 
tion; and tours. Reference tools are available in 
electronic and print formats. Library staff offer 
imdergraduates a one-credit course, LIB 100: 
"Accessing Information in the 21st Century," 
which focuses on effective use of research 
strategies, search techniques, and evaluation 
of resources. Wake Forest students, faculty, 
and staff may use interlibrary loan services to 
borrow materials from other libraries through- 
out the countiy at no charge. 

Special collections in the Z. Smith Reynolds 
Library include the Rare Books Collection, 
which emphasizes American and British 
authors of the late nineteenth and early 
twentieth centuries. Among the collections 
are works by Mark Twain, Gertrude Stein, 
William Butler Yeats, T.S. Eliot, and Maya 
Angelou. There is also an extensive Anglo- 
Irish literature collection. The Ethel Taylor 
Crittenden Baptist Historical Collection 
contains significant books, periodicals, 
manuscripts and church records relating to 
North Carolina Baptists, as well as a collection 
of the personal papers of prominent ministers, 
educators, and government officials with ties 
to Wake Forest. The Wake Forest College/ 
University Archive is maintained in this 
library as well. 

Facilities in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library 
include the Information Technology Center 
(ITC). Digital imaging, scanning, multimedia 
services, collaborative workstations, a com- 
puter lab and technology training are available 



THE UNIVERSITY 



10 



in the ITC. Several small group study rooms 
are located throughout the library and may be 
reserved at the circulation desk. Two 24-hour 
study areas, one with a cyber cafe, are located 
off the lobby and are accessible by key-card 
after regular library hours. Lockers are avail- 
able in the 24-hour study areas for students to 
use on a short term basis. The entire library is 
equipped for wireless Internet access. 

Visit http://zsr.wfu.edu, the Z. Smith Rey- 
nolds Library Web page, for more information. 

Recognition and Accreditation 

Wake Forest University is accredited by the 
Commission on Colleges of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools to award 
bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. 
The Commission can be contacted at (404) 679- 
4501, 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 
30033-4097 and www.sacscoc.org. Inquiries 
should relate only to the accreditation status 
of the institution and not to general admission 
information. 

The Wake Forest University School of 
Medicine is a member of the Association of 
American Medical Colleges and is fully ac- 
credited by the Liaison Committee on Medical 
Education, the joint accrediting body of the 
Association of American Medical Colleges 
and the American Medical Association. The 
School of Law is a member of the Associa- 
tion of American Law Schools and is listed 
as an approved school by the Council of the 
Section of Legal Education and Admissions 
to the Bar of the American Bar Association 
and by the Board of Law Examiners and the 
Council of the North Carolina State Bar. The 
Babcock Graduate School of Management 
and the Wayne Calloway School of Busi- 
ness and Accountancy are accredited by the 
Association to Advance Collegiate Schools 
of Business. The Babcock Graduate School is 
also accredited by the European FoundaHon 
for Management Development. The program 
in counseling leading to the master of arts in 
education degree is accredited by the Council 
for the Accreditation of Counseling and 



Related Educational Programs. The Divinity 
School has obtained associate membership in 
the Association of Theological Schools. 

Wake Forest University is a member of 
many of the major institutional organizations 
and associations at the national, regional, 
and statewide levels, including the follow- 
ing: The American Council on Education, 
the Association of American Colleges, the 
National Association of Independent Colleges 
and Universities, the Council of Graduate 
Schools in the United States, the Commis- 
sion on Colleges of the Southern Association 
of Colleges and Schools, Oak Ridge Associ- 
ated Universities, Southern Universities 
Conference, the North Carolina Conference 
of Graduate Schools, the North Carolina 
Association of Colleges and Universities, the 
North Carolina Department of Public Instruc- 
tion, and the North Carolina Association of 
Independent Colleges and Universities. In 
addition, many offices of the University are 
members of associations which focus on par- 
ticular aspects of university administration. 

Wake Forest has chapters of the principal 
national social fraternities and sororities, 
professional fraternities, and honor societ- 
ies, including Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi. 
There is an active chapter of the American As- 
sociation of University Professors on campus. 

The Undergraduate Schools 

The undergraduate schools. Wake Forest 
College and the Wayne Calloway School of 
Business and Accountancy, are governed by 
the Board of Trustees, the University admin- 
istration, and by their respective faculties. 
Responsibility for academic administration 
is delegated by the president and trustees to 
the provost, who is the chief academic officer 
of the University. The deans of the schools 
report to the provost and are responsible for 
academic planning and administration for 
their schools. 

Wake Forest University is committed to 
administer all educational and employment 
activities without discrimination because 



11 



THE UNIVERSITY 



of race, color, religion, national origin, age, 
sex, veteran status, handicapped status, or 
disability as required by law. The University 
has adopted a procedure for the purpose of 
resolving discrimination complaints. Inquiries 
or concerns should be directed to: Harold 
Holmes, dean of student services, at (336) 758- 
5226; Deborah L. Best, dean of the college, at 
(336) 758-5312; or Doris McLaughlin, assistant 
director of human resources, director of equal 
employment opportunity, and Title IX coordi- 
nator, at (336) 758-4814. 

The Higher Education Act requires that 
institutions of higher education make avail- 
able by October 15 of each year a copy of the 
Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act annual 



report to any student who requests one. 
Please contact the athletic department to 
request a copy of this document. 

Wake Forest rejects hatred and bigotry in 
any form and adheres to the principle that no 
person affiliated with Wake Forest should be 
judged or harassed on the basis of perceived 
or actual sexual orientation. In affirming its 
commitment to this principle. Wake Forest 
does not limit freedom of religious association 
or expression, does not presume to control 
the policies of persons or entities not affili- 
ated with Wake Forest, and does not extend 
benefits beyond those provided under other 
policies of Wake Forest. 



THE UNIVERSITY 



12 



Wake Forest College 




WAKE FOREST COLLEGE IS THE 
UNDERGRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES OF WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 
IT IS THE CENTER OF THE UNIVERSITY'S 
ACADEMIC life; THROUGH IT, THE 
UNIVERSITY CARRIES ON THE TRADITION 
OF PREPAIUNG MEN AND WOMEN FOR 
PERSONAL ENRICHMENT, ENLIGHTENED 
CITIZENSHIP, AND PROFESSIONAL LIFE. 



Wake Forest College is a place of meeting. Its 
teachers and students are of diverse back- 
grounds and interests, and that diversity is 
crucial to the distinctive character of the Col- 
lege. Wake Forest continually examines its 
educational purpose and evaluates its success 
in fulfilling it. A formal statement of purpose 
was prepared as part of the school's decennial 
reaccreditation process and was adopted by the 
Board of Trustees. 

Statement of Purpose 

Wake Forest is a University dedicated to the 
pursuit of excellence in the liberal arts and in 
graduate and professional education. Its dis- 
tinctiveness in its pursuit of its mission derives 
from its private, coeducational, and residential 
character; its size and location; and its Baptist 
heritage. Each of these factors constitutes a 
significant aspect of the unique character of 
the institution. 

The Uruversity is now comprised of seven 
constituent parts: two iindergraduate institu- 
tions. Wake Forest College and the Wayne Cal- 
loway School of Business and Accountancy; 



the Graduate School; and four professional 
schools: the School of Law, the Wake Forest 
University School of Medicine, the Babcock 
Graduate School of Management, and the 
Divinity School. It seeks to honor the ideals 
of liberal learning, which entail commitment 
to transmission of cultural heritages; teaching 
the modes of learning in the basic disciplines 
of human knowledge; developing critical 
appreciation of moral, aesthetic, and religious 
values; advancing the frontiers of knowledge 
through in-depth study and research; and 
applying and using knowledge in the service 
of humanity. 

Wake Forest has been dedicated to the 
liberal arts for over a century and a half; this 
means education in the fundamental fields 
of human knowledge and achievement, as 
distinguished from education that is technical 
or narrowly vocational. It seeks to encourage 
habits of mind that ask "why," that evaluate 
evidence, that are open to new ideas, that 
attempt to understand and appreciate the 
perspectives of others, that accept complexity 
and grapple with it, that admit error, and that 
pursue truth. Wake Forest College has by far 
the largest student body in the University, and 
its function is central to the University's larger 
life. The College and the Graduate School are 
most singularly focused on learning for its 
own sake; they therefore serve as exemplars 
of specific academic values in the Life of the 
University. 

Beginning as early as 1894, Wake Forest 
accepted an obligation to provide profes- 
sional training in a number of fields, as a 
complement to its primary mission of liberal 



13 



WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



arts education. This responsibility is fulfilled 
in the conviction that the humane values 
embodied in the liberal arts are also centrally 
relevant to the professions. Professional edu- 
cation at Wake Forest is characterized by a 
commitment to ethical and other professional 
ideals that transcend technical skills. Like the 
Graduate School, the professional schools are 
dedicated to the advancement of learning in 
their fields. In addition, they are specifically 
committed to the application of knowledge 
to solving concrete probleras of human be- 
ings. They are strengthened by values and 
goals which they share with the College and 
Graduate School, and the professional schools 
enhance the work of these schools and the 
University as a whole by serving as models of 
service to humanity. 

Wake Forest was founded by private initia- 
tive, and ultimate decision-making authority 
lies in a privately appointed Board of Trustees 
rather than in a public body. Funded to a large 
extent from private sources of support. Wake 
Forest is determined to chart its own course 
in the pursuit of its goals. As' a coeducational 
institution, it seeks to "educate together" 
persons of both sexes and from a wide range 
of backgrounds — racial, ethnic, religious, 
geographical, socioeconomic, and cultural. Its 
residential features are conducive to learning 
and to the pursuit of a wide range of cocurric- 
ular activities. It has made a conscious choice 
to remain small in overall size; it takes pride 
in being able to function as a community 
rather than a conglomerate. Its location in the 
Piedmont area of North Carolina engenders 
an ethos that is distinctively Southern, and 
more specifically North Carolinian. As it seeks 
further to broaden its constituency and to 
receive national recognition, it is also finding 
ways to maintain the ethos associated with its 
regional roots. 

Wake Forest is proud of its Baptist and 
Christian heritage. For more than a century 
and a half, it has provided the University 
an indispensable basis for its mission and 
purpose, enabling Wake Forest to educate 



thousands of ministers and lay people for 
enlightened leadership in their churches 
and communities. Far from being exclusive 
and parochial, this religious tradition gives 
the University roots that ensure its lasting 
identity and branches that provide a support- 
ive environment for a wide variety of faiths. 
The Baptist insistence on both the separation 
of church and state and local autonomy has 
helped to protect the University from interfer- 
ence and domination by outside interests, 
whether these be commercial, governmental, 
or ecclesiastical. The Baptist stress upon an 
uncoerced conscience in matters of religious 
belief has been translated into a concern for 
academic freedom. The Baptist emphasis 
upon revealed truth enables a strong religious 
critique of human reason, even as the claims 
of revelation are put under the scrutiny of rea- 
son. The character of intellectual life at Wake 
Forest encourages open and frank dialogue 
and provides assurance that the University 
will be ecumenical and not provincial in 
scope, and that it must encompass perspec- 
tives other than the Christian. Wake Forest 
thus seeks to maintain and invigorate what is 
noblest in its religious heritage. 

Honor System 

Wake Forest University upholds the ideals 
of honor and integrity. The Honor System 
is central to University life; its essence is a 
commitment by each person to do what is 
right and abide by community standards. 
Each student is pledged to be trustworthy in 
all matters', and a violation of that trust is an 
offense against the community as a whole. In 
the specific terms of the Honor Code, a stu- 
dent pledges in all phases of life not to cheat, 
plagiarize, engage in other forms of academic 
or social misconduct, deceive, or steal. The 
strength of the Honor System derives from 
the commitment of each and every student to 
uphold its ideals. 

The Honor System is jointly administered 
by the dean of student services, the associate 
dean/judicial officer, the Honor and Ethics 



/AKE FOREST COLLEGE ^4 



Council, and the Judicial Council. Complete 
details are available at the Office of the Dean 
of Student Services. 

Summary of Computing 
Rights and Responsibilities 

The policy applies to all computer and com- 
puter communication facilities owned, leased, 
operated, or contracted by the University. 
This includes, but is not limited to, word 
processing equipment, microcomputers, mini- 
computers, mainframes, computer networks, 
computer peripherals, and software, whether 
used for administration, research, teaching, or 
other purposes. The policy extends to any use 
of University facilittes to access computers 
elsewhere. 

Wake Forest University provides each of 
its students and faculty with a computer and 
an e-mail account. Outside of the classroom, 
e-mail is an important means of communica- 
tion between faculty, staff, and students. It is 
the responsibility of the student to regularly 
monitor his or her Wake Forest e-mail account 
for University communications. 

Basic Principles. The University's computing 
resources are for instructional and research 
use by the students, faculty, and staff of Wake 
Forest University. Ethical standards that ap- 
ply to other University activities (Honor and 
Ethics System, the Social Regulations and 
Policies, and all local, state, and federal laws) 
apply equally to use of campus computing 
facilities. 

As in all aspects of University life, users of 
computing facilities should act honorably and 
in a marmer consistent with ordinary ethical 
obligations. Cheating, stealing, making false 
or deceiving statements, plagiarism, vandal- 
ism, and harassment are just as wrong in the 
context of computing systems as they are in 
all other domains. 

Use of campus facilities is restricted to 
authorized users. An "authorized user" is an 
individual who has been assigned a login ID 
and password by Information Systems staff 



(on any relevant system), or by an authorized 
agent. Individual users are responsible for the 
proper use of their accounts, including the 
protection of their login IDs and passwords. 
Users are also responsible for reporting any 
activities that they believe to be in violation of 
this policy, just as students are responsible for 
reporting Honor and Ethics System violations. 

Individuals should use these facilities: 

• in a manner consistent with the terms under 
which they were granted access to them; 

• in a way that respects the rights and privacy of 
other users; so as not to interfere with or violate 
the normal, appropriate use of these facilities; 
and 

• in a responsible and efficient manner. 

Abusive activities which are already covered 
under other University policies are to be 
handled in the same way, and by the same 
authorities, as if a computer had not been 
involved, following established guidelines. 

Systems Monitoring. This statement serves 
as notice to all users of campus computing 
systems that regular monitoring of system 
activities may occur. Only designated staff of 
Information Systems have authorization to 
engage in systems monitoring. 

Privacy. All individuals, including members of 
the Information Systems staff, should respect 
the privacy of other authorized users. Thus 
they should respect the rights of other users 
to security of files, confidentiality of data, and 
the ownership of their own work. Nonethe- 
less, in order to enforce the policies set out 
here, designated Information Systems staff 
are permitted to monitor activity on local 
computing systems. 

In the event that staff should investigate 
a user, a record of the investigation shall 
be placed in a permanent file to be kept in 
Information Systems, beyond the standard log 
of all systems monitoring. This record shall 
state why the user was investigated, what 



15 



WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



files were examined, and the results of the 
investigation. Information Systems staff shall 
not reveal the contents of users' files, users' 
activities, or the record of investigations 
except in the following cases (and then only 
with the approval of the chief information 
officer or the provost): 

• Evidence of Honor and Ethics System or Social 
Regulations and Policies violations will be refer- 
red to the dean of the appropriate school or to 
the dean of student services. 

• Evidence of improper activities by University 
employees will he referred to the director of 
human resources or the appropriate University 
officers. 

• Evidence of violations of law will be referred to 
the appropriate law enforcement officials. 

Disciplinary Actions. Substantial evidence 
of a violation of the principles described in 
this policy statement may result in disciplin- 
ary action. As stated above, in cases where a 
policy already exists, and the only difference 
is that a computer was used to perform the 
activity, such action will be taken through 
appropriate University channels such as 
administrative procedures, the Honor and 
Ethics Council, the Graduate Council, or other 
supervisory authority to which the individual 
is subject. Violation of state or federal statutes 
may result in civil or criminal proceedings. 
Otherwise, those who engage in computer 
violations are subject to the authority of Infor- 
mation Systems. 

Violation of the policies articulated here 
may result in one or more of the following, 
plus any additional actions deemed appropri- 
ate by Information Systems: 

• Suspension of one's ability to perform interac- 
tive logins on relevant machines on campus. 

• Suspension of one's ability to login to a campus 
network. 

• Suspension of one's ability to send e-mail. 

• Suspension of one's ability to receive e-mail. 



• Increased monitoring of further computer activ- 
ity (beyond normal systems monitoring). 

Any disciplinary action taken by Information 
Systems may be revoked and /or modified by 
the provost of the University or anyone the 
provost designates to deal with such matters. 

Locating Computing Policy Information and 
Policy Updates. The above summary is based 
on the "Policy on Ethical and Responsible 
Use of Computing Resources" and other 
computing policies. These policies may be 
updated, shortened, or expanded from time to 
time. Full policies can be reviewed online at 
www.wfu.edu/is. 

Student Complaints 

Situations may arise in which a student 
believes that he or she has not received fair 
treatment by a representative of the Univer- 
sity or has a complaint about the performance, 
actions, or inaction of the staff or faculty af- 
fecting a student. The procedure for bringing 
these issues to the appropriate person or body 
is outlined here. Students are encouraged to 
seek assistance from their advisers or another 
member of the faculty or staff in evaluating 
the nature of their complaints or deciding on 
an appropriate course of action. 

A complaint should first be directed as 
soon as possible to the person or persons 
whose actions or inactions have given rise to 
the problem — not later than three months af- 
ter the event. For complaints in the academic 
setting, the student should talk personally 
with the instructor. Should the student and 
instructor be unable to resolve the conflict, the 
student, if unsatisfied, should then turn to the 
chair of the involved department (the dean in 
the Calloway School) for assistance. The chair 
(or dean) will meet with both parties, seek 
to understand their individual perspectives, 
and within a reasonable time, reach a conclu- 
sion and share it with both parties. Finally, 
a student may appeal to the Committee on 



WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



16 



Academic Affairs which will study the mat- 
ter, work with the parties, and reach a final 
resolution. 

Students having complaints outside 
the academic setting, and who have been 
unable to resolve the matter with the indi- 
vidual directly involved, should process the 
complaint in a timely manner through the 
administrative channels of the appropriate 
unit. Students uncertain about the proper 
channels are encouraged to seek advice 
from faculty advisers, deans' offices, or 
the Office of the Dean of Student Services. 
Complaints which rise to the level of a griev- 
ance (as determined by the earlier steps in 
the process) may be heard as a final appeal 
before a University official designated by 
the provost after reviewing the nature of 
the complaint. The committee will include a 
representative of the faculty and a member 
of the student body. The grievance must 
be filed in writing. Grievances not deemed 
frivolous by the committee will be heard. The 
student may be assisted during the hearing 
by a member of the University community. 

The complaint /grievance process out- 
lined above is meant to answer and resolve 
issues arising between individual students 



and the University and its various offices 
from practices and procedures affecting that 
relationship. In many cases, there are mecha- 
nisms already in place for the reporting and 
resolution of specialized complaints (harass- 
ment and discrimination, for instance), and 
these should be fully used where appropri- 
ate. Violation of student conduct rules or the 
honor system should be addressed through 
the judicial process specifically designed for 
that purpose. 

History and Development 

Since 1834, Wake Forest College has devel- 
oped its distinctive pattern of characteristics: 
tenacity, independence, a fierce defense of 
free inquiry and expression, and a concern 
that knowledge be used responsibly and 
compassionately. That these characteristics 
have served the school well is displayed by 
its growth from a small sectarian school to 
one of the nation's significant small private 
universities. 

The brief history of Wake Forest appears- 
ing on page 18 is useful in understanding the 
University as it is today and appreciating the 
process through which it developed. 



17 



WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Chronological History of Wake Forest University 




1834 


Founded in the town of Wake Forest, 


1950 


Harold Wayland Tribble, president 




North Carolina, as Wake Forest Manual 
Labor Institute by the Baptist State Con- 
vention of North Carolina. Samuel Wait, 
president 

Named Wake Forest College 


1956 


Move to Winston-Salem in response to 
an endowment from the Z. Smith 
Reynolds Foundation 


1838 


1961 


Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 
established 


1845 


William Hooper, president 


1967 


James Ralph Scales, president 


1 849 John Brown White, president 


1967 


Change of name to Wake Forest 


1854 Washington Manly Wingate, president 




University 


1879 


Thomas Henderson Pritchard, president 


1969 


Charles H. Babcock Graduate School of 


1884 


Charles Elisha Taylor, president 




Management established 


1894 


School of Law established 


1983 


Thomas K. Hearn Jr., president 


1902 


Two-year School of Medicine 


1984 


Sesquicentennial anniversary 




established 


1986 


Established governing independence 


1905 
1921 
1927 


William Louis Poteat, president 

First summer session 

Francis Pendleton Gaines, president 


1995 


from the Baptist State Convention of 
North Carolina 

School of Business and Accountancy is 
renamed the Wayne Calloway School of 


1930 


Thurman D. Kitchin, president 




Business and Accountancy 


1941 


Relocation of the School of Medicine to 


1997 


Change of name to Wake Forest Univer- 




Winston-Salem and eventual change 




sity School of Medicine 




of name to Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine and association with the North 
Carolina Baptist Hospital 


1999 
2005 


Divinity School founded 
Nathan 0. Hatch, president 


1 942 Women admitted as undergraduate 






m 


students 







WAKE FOREST COLLEGE jg 



Procedures 







ALL STUDENTS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR 
FAMILIARIZING THEMSELVES WITH THE 
PORTIONS OF THIS BULLETIN THAT 
PERTAIN TO THEIR COURSE OF STUDY. 
STATEMENTS CONCERNING COURSES AND 
EXPENSES ARE NOT TO BE REGARDED AS 
IRREVOCABLE CONTRACTS BETWEEN THE 
STUDENT AND THE INSTITUTION. THE 
UNIVERSITY RESERVES THE RIGHT TO 
CHANGE THE SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 
AND THE COST OF INSTRUCTION AT ANY 
TIME WITHIN THE STUDENT'S TERM OF 
RESIDENCE. 

Admission 

Candidates for admission must furnish evi- 
dence of maturity and educational achieve- 
ment. The Committee on Admissions carefully 
considers the applicant's academic records, 
scores on tests, and evidence of character, mo- 
tivation, goals, and general fitness for study in 
the College. The applicant's secondary school 
program must establish a commitment to the 
kind of broad liberal education reflected in the 
academic requirements of the College. 

Admission as a first-year student nor- 
mally requires graduation from an accredited 
secondary school with a minimum of sixteen 
units of high school credit. These should in- 
clude four units in English, three in mathema- 
tics, two in history and social studies, two in a 
single foreign language, and one in the natural 
sciences. An applicant who presents at least 
twelve units of differently distributed college 



preparatory study can be considered. A lim- 
ited number of applicants may be admitted 
without the high school diploma, with par- 
ticular attention given to ability, maturity, and 
motivation. 

Application 

An application is secured from the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions in person or by 
mail (P.O. Box 7305, Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina 27109-7305) or online at www. wfu. 
edu/admissions. It should be completed and 
returned to that office no later than January 15 
for the fall semester. Most admissions deci- 
sions for the fall semester are made by April 1, 
with prompt notification of applicants. For 
the spring semester, applications should be 
completed and returned no later than Novem- 
ber 15. Except in emergency, the final date for 
applying for the fall semester is August 1 and 
for the spring semester, January 1. Application 
on this last-date basis is primarily for nonresi- 
dent students. 

Wake Forest accepts the Common Applica- 
tion in lieu of its own form and gives equal 
consideration to both. Students may obtain 
copies of the Common Application from their 
high schools. 

The admission application requires records 
and recommendations directly from second- 
ary school officials. It also requires test scores, 
preferably from the senior year, on the SAT 
I: Reasoning Test of The College Board or the 
ACT with writing test. SAT II: Subject Test 
scores are optional. All test scores should be 
sent directly to the University by Educational 
Testing Service. A nonrefundable $50 fee to 
cover the cost of processing must accompany 
an application. It cannot be applied to later 



19 



PROCEDURES 



charges for accepted students or refunded for 
others. The University reserves the right to 
reject any apphcation without explanation. 
A $500 admission deposit is required of 
all regularly admitted students and must be 
sent to the Office of Undergraduate Admis- 
sions no later than May 1 following notice 
of acceptance. It is credited toward first 
semester fees and is nonrefundable. Stu- 
dents notified of acceptance after May 1 
for the fall semester or November 1 for the 
spring semester should make a nonrefund- 
able admission deposit within two weeks 
of notification. Failure to make the admis- 
sion deposit is taken as cancellation of 
application by the student. No deposit is 
required for summer session enrollment. 

Early Decision 

Wake Forest has a binding early decision plan 
for students who have decided conclusively 
that Wake Forest is their first college choice. 
Students may apply after completion of the 
junior year but no later than November 15. 
While early decision applicants may submit 
regular decision applications to other institu- 
tions. Wake Forest must be the applicant's 
first choice and only early decision applica- 
tion. Students, parents, and school counselors 
must sign the Early Decision Agreement stat- 
ing that the applicant will enroll if admitted 
and will withdraw all applications to other 
colleges upon acceptance to Wake Forest. 
Early decision applicants are notified on a 
rolling basis after September 15, typically 
4-6 weeks after the application is completed. 
A $500 enrollment deposit is due January 1. 

Admission of Students with Disabilities 

Wake Forest College will consider the applica- 
tion of any qualified student, regardless of 
disability, on the basis of the selection criteria 
established by the University which include 
personal and academic merit. Upon matricu- 
lation, all students will be required to meet 
the same standards for graduation. 



The University endeavors to provide facili- 
ties which are in compliance with all laws and 
regulations regarding access for individuals 
with disabilities. Additionally, special services 
are available to reasonably accommodate 
students with disabilities. For more informa- 
tion on assistance for undergraduate students, 
please contact Van D. Westervelt, director 
of the Learning Assistance Center, at (336) 
758-5929 or refer to Disability Services under 
Campus Life on the Wake Forest Web site. 

Advanced Placement and CLEP 

Advanced placement credit for college level 
work done in high school is available on the 
basis of the Advanced Placement Examination 
of The College Board and supplementary 
information. Especially well-qualified ap- 
plicants for advanced standing may also be 
exempt from some basic core courses with 
credit on the authorization of the department 
concerned. Credit by advanced standing is 
treated in the same manner as credit trans- 
ferred from another college. 

Under certain conditions, especially well- 
prepared applicants may be granted limited 
college credit through the subject tests of the 
College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 
of the Educational Testing Service. Such credit 
may be assigned with the approval of the de- 
partment concerned or the dean of the Wayne 
Calloway School of Business and Accountancy. 

Admission of Transfer Students 

The number of transfer students who can 
be admitted each year depends upon the 
availability of space in the first-year (second 
semester), sophomore, and junior classes. 
Transfer students must be eligible for readmis- 
sion to the last college attended and must 
supply a Dean's Statement(s) from all colleges 
attended. The Dean's Statement addresses 
any disciplinary action that may have been 
taken against the student for academic or 
non-academic reasons. The student must have 
an overall average of at least C on all college 



PROCEDURES 



20 



work attempted. A student who is admitted 
from another college before fully meeting 
the prescribed admissions requirements for 
entering first-year students must remove the 
entrance conditions during the first year at 
Wake Forest. 

Courses satisfactorily completed in other 
accredited colleges are accepted subject to fac- 
ulty approval. In general, no credit is allowed 
for courses not found in the Wake Forest cur- 
riculum. The minimum residence requirement 
for a baccalaureate degree is two academic 
years, the senior and one other. 

Student Health 
Information Summary Form 

All new students are required to have on 
file in the Student Health Service the WFU 
Student Health Service Health Information Sum- 
mary Form. It must be received by the Student 
Health Service before July 1 for new students 
entering fall semester or before January 1 for 
new students entering spring semester. The 
form, which requests information regarding 
documentation of immunizations required by 
the University and the State of North Caro- 
lina, is available at http://wfu.edu/shs. 

Immunization Policy 

Wake Forest University and North Carolina 
State law (G.S. 130A-152) require documenta- 
tion of certain immunizations for students 
attending a North Carolina college or uni- 
versity. Students must submit certification of 
these immunizations PRIOR TO REGISTRATION. 
Documentation should be on or attached to the 
completed "WFU Student Health Service Health 
Information Summary Form" provided by the 
Student Health Service in order to assure correct 
identification of the student. It you have not 
received the Health Information Summary 
form, contact the Student Health Service or 
you may download it from the WFUSHS Web 
page (www.wfu.edu/shs/docs/HIS.pdf). Ac- 
ceptable documentation is a statement signed 
by the appropriate official(s) having custody 



of the records of immunization, such as a 
physician, county health department director, 
or a certificate from a student's high school 
containing the approved dates of immuniza- 
tions. The State statute applies to all students 
except those registered in off -campus courses 
only, attending night or weekend classes only, 
or taking a course load of four (4) credit hours 
or less. 

The American College Health Association 
recommendations and North Carolina State 
Law require certification in accordance with 
the following: 

Required: 

Tetanus and Diphtheria. Students must docu- 
ment three doses of a combined tetanus 
diphtheria vaccine (DTaP, Td, or Tdap) 
of which one must be within ten years of 
enrollment. 

Rubeola (Measles). Students must document 
two doses of live virus measles vaccine 
given at least thirty days apart, on or after 
their first birthday unless (a) they have a 
physician's certificate which states that they 
have had measles prior to 1/1/94, (b) they 
were born prior to 1/1/57, or (c) they have 
documentation of a titer indicating they are 
immune. 

Rubella (German Measles). Students must doc- 
ument that they have had one dose of live 
virus vaccine on or after their first birthday 
unless (a) they have documentation of a 
titer indicating they are immune, or (b) they 
will be fifty years old before they enroll. 
History of the disease is not acceptable. 

Mumps. Students must document that they 
have had two doses of live virus mumps 
vaccine, given at least 30 days apart, on 
or after their first birthday unless (a) they 
were bom before 1/1/57, or (b) they have 
documentation of a titer indicating they 
are immune. History of the disease is not 
acceptable. 

Polio. Students must document that they have 
had a trivalent polio vaccine series and a 



21 



PROCEDURES 



booster on or after their fourth birthday un- 
less they will be eighteen years old or older 
when they enroll. 

Tuberculin Skin Test. The test is required 
within twelve months of the University 
registration date for (a) students who 
have been exposed to tuberculosis or 
(b) students whose home country is other 
than the United States, Australia, New 
Zealand, Canada, Western Europe, or Ja- 
pan. If the student is known to be tubercu- 
lin-positive or if this test is positive, attach 
a record of treatment. 

Recommended: 

Hepatitis B. A three-dose series of the vaccine 
is recommended by the Centers for Disease 
Control. 

Varicella. A two-dose series is recommended. 
Discuss with your health provider. 

Meningococcal. Recommended for first-year 
undergraduates living in residence halls. 

Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine 
(HPV). The three-dose series. 

Immunizations required under North Caro- 
lina law must be documented within thirty 
days following registration. After that time, 
students with incomplete documentation of 
immunizations will not be permitted to attend 
classes. Please note that some series require 
several months for completion. 

Expenses 

Statements concerning expenses are not to be 
regarded as forming an irrevocable contract 
between the student and the University. The 
costs of instruction and other services out- 
lined herein are those in effect on the date of 
publication of this bulletin, and the University 
reserves the right to change without notice 
the cost of instruction and other services at 
any time. 

Charges are due in full on August 1 for 
the fall semester and December 1 for the 
spring semester. Faculty regulations require 



that student accounts be settled in full before 
the student is entitled to receive a transcript 
or diploma, or to register for the following 
semester or term. 

If the University deems it necessary to 
engage the services of a collection agency 
or attorney to collect or to settle any dispute 
in connection with an unpaid balance on a 
student account, the student will be liable for 
all collection agency and /or attorney's fees, 
reasonable expenses, and costs incurred. 



Tuition 

Full-time 
Part-time 
Activity Fee 



Per Semester Per Year 

$17,115 $34,230 

$1,420 per semester hour 
$50 $100 



Students should expect an increase yearly in 
tuition. However, admittance to the under- 
graduate College is not based on financial 
resources. The University meets the dem- 
onstrated financial needs of all qualified 
students. Students must obtain approval for 
part-time status prior to the beginning of the 
semester from the Office of the Dean of the 
College to be eligible for part-time tuition. 

Students enrolled in the College or in 
the Wayne Calloway School of Business 
and Accountancy for full-time residence 
credit are entitled to full privileges regard- 
ing libraries, laboratories, athletic contests, 
concerts, publications, the Student Union, the 
University Theatre, and the Student Health 
Service. Part-time students are entitled to the 
use of the libraries, laboratories, and Student 
Health Service but not to the other privileges 
mentioned above. 

Room Charges 

Per Semester Per Year 
Double occupancy $3,040 $6,080 

Most first-year students will pay either $3,040 
or $3,400 per semester depending upon room 



PROCEDURES 



22 



assignment location. Other room rentals range 
from $2,840 to $3,600 per semester. 

Dining Choices 

Dining plans allows students to enjoy all-you- 
care-to-eat dining for breakfast, lunch, and 
dinner in the Reynolda Fresh Food Company 
and lunch in the Magnolia Room. Dining 
plans are also available in either the Deacon 
17 or the Deacon 14 All-in-One plan. The All- 
in-One plan allows one meal exchange and 
cash equivalency at the Benson Center Food 
Court per meal period. 

Dining Plans 

All resident students are required to sign up 
for a dining plan. Off-campus students may 
purchase a dining plan, but are not required 
to do so. 

All students, regardless of class year, can 
change (increase or decrease) their meal plan 
through August 1, adhering to area and class 
year minimums. Plan decreases are not al- 
lowed after August 1; however, plan increases 
will be accepted through the second Friday 
after fall classes begin, adhering to area and 
class year minimums. Charges will not be 
pro-rated; extra meals will be added to the 
student account. 

Visit www.campusdish.com/en-US/ 
eCampusl/WakeForest for more details on all 
dining plan choices,. 

Meals Per Week 

Students receive a set number of meals per 
week based on the plan selected. When stu- 
dents eat in either the Reynolda Fresh Food 
Company or the Magnolia Room, a meal is 
subtracted from the weekly meal balance. 
Unused meals carry over from week to week 
(with the exception of the All-in-One plans) 
through the end of the semester, but not from 
one semester to the next. Dining plans are as 
follows: 



Residential Meal Plans 



FRFSHMFN 




Meals Per Week 


Cost Per Semester 


Unlimited 


$1,880 


17 


$1,495 


14 


$1,370 (min. purchase req.) 



Deacon 1 7 All-in-One $ 1 ,895 
Deacon 14 All-in-One $1,730 



UPPFRCIASSMFN 



South & Quad Area Building Residents: Babcock, 
Bostwick, Collins, Johnson, Later, Palmer, Piccolo, 
Davis, Kitchin, Efrid, Huffman, Poteat, Taylor. 

Meats Per Week Cost Per Semester 

Unlimited $1,880 

17 $1,495 

14 $1,370 

10 $1,135 

8 $ 940 (min. purchase req.) 

Deacon 17 All-in-One $1,895 

Deacon 1 4 All-in-One $ 1 ,730 



North Area Building Residents: Martin, Polo, 
Student Apartments, Polo Road Houses, and 
Townhouses. 



Meals Per Week 


Cost Per Semester 


Unlimited 




$1,880 


17 




$1,495 


14 




$1,370 


10 




$1,135 


8 




$ 940 


5 




$ 620 


40 meals per semester 


$ 305 (min. purchase req.) 


Deacon 17 All- 


in-One 


$1,895 


Deacon 14 All- 


-in-One 


$1,730 



Commuters (Off-Campus Students) 

Commuters may purchase any dining plan, 
but are not required to do so. 



Deacon Dollars 

In addition to a dining plan, students may 
also purchase Deacon Dollars. The Deacon 
Dollar account is a debit account system on 
the student l.D. card that allows purchases 



23 



PROCEDURES 



throughout campus. An amount of $1,000 
per semester is recommended for campus 
purchases at the Bookstore, Pizza Hut, Benson 
Food Court, Subway, convenience stores, and 
all other dining locations. 

Other Charges/Fees 

An admission application fee of $50 is required 
with each application for admission to cover 
the cost of processing and is non-refundable. 

An admission deposit of $500 is required for 
students applying to Wake Forest University. 
All admissions deposits must be submitted 
to the director of admissions and are non- 
refundable. The applicable deposit is credited 
to the student's charges for the semester 
for which he or she has been accepted for 
admission. 

Individual instruction music fees are required 
in addition to tuition for students enrolling 
for individual study in applied music in the 
Department of Music and are payable in the 
Office of Financial and Accounting Services. 
The fee is $260 for MUS 161 courses and $520 
for all other individual instruction courses, 
with a maximum fee of $520 per semester. 

Library fees are charged for lost or damaged 
books and are payable in the library. 

A tuition deposit of $500 is required by March 
15 of students enrolled in the spring semester 
who expect to return for the fall semester. It 
is credited to the student's University charges 
and is non-refundable. 

Returned check fee of $25 is charged for each 
returned check by the Office of Financial and 
Accounting Services. 

Room change fee of $50 is charged for any 
unauthorized change. 

Improper check-in/out residence hall fee of $50 is 
charged for any student who does not follow 
appropriate administiative procedures. 



A residence hall lock core change fee (a minimum 
of $70 per lock) is charged to any student who 
loses his/her room /suite /apartment key(s). 

For students studying abroad in a non-Wake 
Forest program a fee of $1,500 is required. 

Motor vehicle registration for the school year for 
freshmen /first-year students is $225. For up- 
perclassmen, the registiation fee is $325. Traf- 
fic fines range from $20 to $250. All students 
operating a vehicle on campus, whether they 
are operating day or night and whether or not 
they are owned by the operator, (including 
those students who reside in student apart- 
ments, theme, and satellite houses) must 
register their vehicles online. 

Vehicle registiations must be completed 
within 24 hours from the first time the vehicle 
is brought to campus. For fall semester only, 
students registering vehicles online by August 
15 will receive their decals at their campus 
mailboxes by August 31, 2007. For a vehicle to 
be properly registered, both the rear bumper 
decal and front windshield gate pass decal 
must be displayed. 

Fines are assessed against students violat- 
ing parking regulations. Please inform any 
visitors of parking rules and regulations. 
Students, faculty, and staff are responsible for 
their visitors. Students will be held financially 
responsible for citations issued to vehicles 
driven by family members or by friends who 
use a Wake Forest student's vehicle. Visitor 
vehicles must be reported to 758-5592 and /or 
registered at the Office of Parking Manage- 
ment, 758-6129. 

Refunds of Charges and 
Return of Financial Aid Funds 

A student who withdraws during (begins, but 
does not complete) a term may be entitled to 
a refund of certain charges as outlined in the 
Refund of Charges Policy. A withdrawal also 
affects financial aid eligibility, as outlined in 
the federal Return of Title IV Program Funds 
Policy and the Return of Non-Title FV Program 
Funds Policy. A student using scholarships. 



PROCEDURES 24 



grants, or loans to help pay educational ex- 
penses, whose account was paid-in-full prior 
to withdrawal, is likely to owe the University 
after withdrawal. Withdrawal procedures are 
coordinated by the deans of the College and 
the Wayne Calloway School of Business and 
Accountancy. 

Refund of Charges Policy 

A withdrawing student receives a tuition 
refund according to the following schedule. 
This schedule applies to a student who drops 
courses, as well as to a student who with- 
draws. 

Tuition, fees, room rent, and related charges are 
not refunded for findings of responsibility within 
the undergraduate student judicial review process. 
Return of Title IV funds are handled in accordance 
with federal law. 



Number of Weeks 


Percentage of 


Attendance 


Total 


(Including first day of 


Tuition to be 


registration validation) 


Refunded 


1 week Total tuition less deposii 


2 weeks 


75 percent 


3 weeks 


50 percent 


4 weeks 


25 percent 



A withdrawal must be official and students 
must return the University identification card 
before claiming a refund. There is no refund 
of room rent, activity fees, or the parking 
registration fee if the decal has been placed 
on the vehicle. Unused meal plan funds are 
refunded. Fees for individual instruction in 
the Department of Music are refunded on the 
same basis as tuition. 

The Office of Financial and Accounting 
Services calculates the refund of charges, and 
it has available an example of the application 
of the University Refund of Charges policy. 

If charges originally paid by financial aid 
funds are no longer covered after the financial 
aid funds are returned, the student is respon- 
sible for the remaining balance. 



Return of Title IV Program Funds Policy 

The 1998 amendments to the Higher Educa- 
tion Act (HEA) of 1965 (Section 484B), and 
subsequent regulations issued by the United 
States Department of Education (34 CFR 
668.22), establish a policy for the return of 
Title IV, HEA Program grant and loan funds 
for a recipient who withdraws. 

Wake Forest University does not have a 
leave of absence policy that would either 
exempt any student from the requirements of 
the Return of Title IV Funds policy or extend 
federal student loan deferment benefits. 

Title IV funds subject to return include the 
following aid programs: Federal Pell Grant, 
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportu- 
nity Grant, Academic Competitiveness Grant, 
National Science and Mathematics Access to 
Retain Talent Grant, Federal Perkins Loan, 
Federal Stafford Loan (subsidized and unsub- 
sidized), and Federal PLUS Loan. 

The percentage of the term completed is 
determined by dividing the total number of 
calendar days comprising the term (excluding 
breaks of five or more consecutive days) into 
the number of calendar days completed. The 
percentage of Title IV grant and loan funds 
earned is: (1) up through the 60% point in 
time, the percentage of the term completed, 
(2) after the 60% point in time, 100%. 

The amount of Title IV grant and loan 
funds unearned is the complement of the per- 
centage of earned Title IV funds applied to 
the total amount of Title IV funds disbursed 
(including funds that were not disbursed but 
could have been disbursed, i.e., post-with- 
drawal disbursements). 

If the amount earned is less than the 
amount disbursed, the difference is returned 
to the Title FV programs. If the amount earned 
is greater than the amount disbursed, the 
difference is treated as a late disbursement 
in accordance with the federal rules for late 
disbursements. 

Unearned funds, up to the amount of 
total institutional charges multiplied by the 



25 



PROCEDURES 



unearned percentage of funds, are returned 
by the University; the student returns any 
portion of unearned funds not returned by 
the University. 

Institutional charges (costs) include tuition 
and required fees, on-campus room rental, 
and on-campus meal plan. 

The Federal Return of Title IV Funds policy 
requires that federal aid be considered as first 
applied toward institutional charges, regard- 
less of other non-federal aid received. 

A student (or parent for PLUS loans) repays 
the calculated amount attributable to a Title 
rV loan program according to the loan's terms. 
If repayment of grant funds by the student is 
required, only 50% of the unearned amount 
must be repaid. A student repays a Title IV 
grant program subject to repayment arrange- 
ments satisfactory to the University or the 
Secretary of Education's overpayment collec- 
tion procedures. 

Funds returned are credited in the follow- 
ing order: Unsubsidized FFEL (Stafford) 
Loans, Subsidized FFEL (Stafford) Loans, 
Federal Perkins Loans, Federal PLUS Loans, 
Federal Pell Grants, Academic Competitive- 
ness Grants, National Science and Mathemat- 
ics Access to Retain Talent Grants, Federal 
Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grants, and other Title IV funds for which a 
return of funds is required. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid calcu- 
lates the amount of unearned Title IV grant 
and loan funds, and it has available examples 
of the application of this federal policy and a 
copy of the relevant Code of Federal Regula- 
tions section (CFR 668.22). 

Return of Non-Title IV 
Program Funds Policy 

A student who drops to less-than-fuU-time 
enrollment within the time frame to receive a 
tuition refund loses eligibility for all institu- 
tional aid for the entire term. For financial aid 
purposes, full-time enrollment is defined as 
twelve or more hours each semester. 



The Office of Student Financial Aid cal- 
culates the amount of Non-Title IV program 
funds to be returned to the various programs 
when a recipient withdraws. The return of 
Non-Title IV Program funds may be rounded 
to the nearest dollar for each aid source. 

Return of funds to various state and pri- 
vate aid programs is determined by specific 
program rules. If rules allow, state and private 
loan funds are returned before gift funds. 
State and private funds may be retained in 
amounts necessary to satisfy the student's re- 
maining University charges or adjusted need, 
whichever is larger. 

Awards from institutional funds for which 
all disbursement requirements have not been 
met by the student prior to withdrawal are 
cancelled, and no disbursements are made. 

Upon withdrawal, an adjusted estimated 
cost of attendance (COA) is established in 
two parts. 

For an on-campus student, the first part 
equals the adjusted tuition and room rental 
charges and the standard allowance for books 
and supplies; the second part equals pro-rated 
estimates (by weeks) of meal, tiansportation, 
and personal living expenses. 

For an off -campus student, the first part 
equals the adjusted tuition charge and the 
standard allowance for books and supplies; 
the second part equals pro-rated estimates 
(by weeks) of room, meal, transportation, and 
personal living expenses. 

If the adjusted COA is greater than the 
full semester expected family contiibution 
(EFC), the student retains institutional aid 
(in the same mix of initially-awarded gift 
and loan), up to the amount required to meet 
the adjusted need and not exceeding the 
initial amount(s). The EFC represents a best 
estimate of a family's capacity (relative to 
other families) to absorb, over time, the costs 
of education. For a withdrawing student, the 
full EFC is expected to support educational 
expenses incurred, prior to any support from 
aid programs. For purposes of this calcula- 
tion, a student who receives only merit-based 



PROCEDURES 26 



institutional gift is considered to have an EFC 
equal to the full semester COA minus the 
amount of that gift. The order in which each 
institutional fund is reduced is determined on 
a case-by-case basis by the aid office, with the 
guiding principle being the return of funds to 
University accounts most likely to be needed 
by other students. 

A student who withdraws after receiving 
a cash disbursement must repay Wake Forest 
scholarship fvmds up to the amount of Title IV 
funds that the University must return. Fines 
and other incidental charges not included in 
the financial aid COA are solely the respon- 
sibility of the student. Required returns of 
funds to all financial aid programs are made 
prior to the refund to the student. 

Housing 

All unmarried first- and second-year students 
with residential admission status are required 
to live in the residence halls, except (1) when 
permission is given by the director of resi- 
dence life and housing for the student to live 
with parents or a relative in the Winston- 
Salem area; (2) by special arrangement 
when space is not available on campus; (3) 
the student is admitted as a non-resident 
student; or (4) if the student has lost residence 
hall space because of a Residence Halls 
Agreement violation or disciplinary action. 
Fifth-year students are ineligible for campus 
housing except when permitted to do so by 
the Office of Residence Life and Housing. 
Married students are not permitted to live 
within the residence halls. Residence halls 
are supervised by the director of residence 
life and housing, residence life coordinators, 
and graduate student hall directors. 

The charges for residence hall rooms for 
2007-2008 will range from approximately 
$2,840 to $3,600 per semester depending on 
the location and amenities available. 

Visit www.wfu.edu/housing, the residence 
life and housing Web site, for more informa- 
tion regarding policies and procedures. 



Off-Campus Housing Policy 

The University has developed guidelines and 
policies for those undergraduate students 
who desire or are required to live off campus. 
Such policies affect apartment or other multi- 
family residences as well as single-family 
residences. All students who desire to live off 
campus are required to apply for off-campus 
housing status on an annual basis. 

Each year, guideline information is pro- 
vided for all undergraduate students on the 
residence life and housing Web page. For 
complete information visit www.wfu.edu/ 
housing / residence / offcampus.html . Condi- 
tions may be placed on students who choose 
to live in single family areas, or students 
may be denied the ability to live within such 
a location. Students who desire to reside off 
campus must complete an application and 
obtain approval from the Office of Residence 
Life and Housing prior to signing off -campus 
leases. 

Resident undergraduate students are 
guaranteed campus housing for eight semes- 
ters. All first- and second-year students are 
required to live on campus. To protect stu- 
dents and to give students the most options 
until they have had an opportunity to review 
this policy fully, student's must not sign any 
off-campus leases. Please visit the Office of 
Residence Life and Housiiig, on campus in 
the Benson University Center, room 101, or 
online at www.wfu.edu/housing. 

Student Health Service 

The Student Health Service promotes a 
healthy lifestyle through health education 
and health maintenance. A physician-directed 
medical staff offers urgent care, illness care, 
physical examinations, counseling, limited 
psychiatric care, allergy injections, immuni- 
zations, gynecological services, pharmacy, 
laboratory, sports medicine clinic, referral 
to specialists, confidential HIV testing, and 
travel information. 



27 



PROCEDURES 



A full staff is available by appointment 
during clinic hours (fall and spring semes- 
ters): 8:30 a.m.-noon; 1:30 p.m.-4 p.m., Mon- 
day through Friday and Monday-Thursday 
during the summer. A limited staff is available 
for urgent care and observation 24 hours a 
day, seven days a week, v^^hen school is in ses- 
sion during the academic year. The services 
of the staff are covered by tuition. There is 
a charge for medications, laboratory tests, 
observation care, and some supplies and ser- 
vices. Payment can be made by paying cash, 
check. Deacon Dollars or the charge can be 
placed on the student's account in the Office 
of Financial and Accounting Services. A copy 
of the statement is given to the student to file 
with their insurance company. 

Confidentiality. Medical information and 
records are strictly confidential. Information 
or records are not released to University 
officials, friends, or family members without 
the student's permission. In addition infor- 
mation will not be shared with therapists or 
physicians who are not involved in the 
student's immediate care without the 
student's permission. 

Online Health Information. For more informa- 
tion, visit the "Campus Life" section of the 
Wake Forest homepage, www.wfu.edu. 

Class Excuses. The health service does not is- 
sue statements or excuses for class attendance. 

Health Insurance. University policy requires 
that all students have health insurance. In- 
formation about the student group insurance 
plan, for those not covered by a family plan, 
is available at www.wfu.edu/shs or www. 
studentresources.com. The annual rate for 
2006-2007 was $1,279. Students are strongly 
encouraged to review their current plan to 
assure adequate coverage. 

Inclement Weather. When the University is 
closed due to inclement weather, the Student 
Health Service will have limited staff and 
will be able to provide care only for injuries 



and urgent illnesses. Appointments will be 
rescheduled. 

Retention of Medical Records. Student medi- 
cal records are retained for ten years after 
the last treatment, after which time they are 
destroyed. Immunization records are kept 
longer. 

Academic Calendar 

The academic calendar of the College and 
the Wayne Calloway School of Business and 
Accountancy includes a faU semester begin- 
ning in late August and ending in December, 
a spring semester beginning in January and 
ending in May, and two five-week summer 
sessions. Semesters usually last fifteen weeks. 

Orientation and Advising 

A required orientation program for new 
students in the College precedes first-time 
registration. An academic adviser provides 
guidance during and between registration 
periods throughout the student's first and 
second years. Advisers meet with students 
both individually and in small groups. A face- 
to-face meeting with the adviser is required 
before all registration periods. Students are 
encouraged to take the initiative in arranging 
additional meetings at any time to seek advice 
or other assistance. The adviser suggests and 
approves courses of instruction until the stu- 
dent declares a major toward the end of the 
second year. Then, a new adviser is assigned. 

Registration 

Registration for continuing students in the 
College and the Wayne Calloway School of 
Business and Accountancy occurs in April for 
the fall and summer terms, and in November 
for the spring term. New and readmitted stu- 
dents register at the beginning of the term in 
which they first enroll. Consultation with the 
academic adviser must be completed before 
registration. Confirmation of enrollment is 



PROCEDURES 28 



required before classes begin each term. All 
tuition and fees must be paid in full to the 
Office of Financial and Accounting Services 
before confirmation. 

Classification 

Classification of students by class standing 
and as full-time or part-time is calculated in 
terms of hours. Most courses in the College 
and the Wayne Calloway School of Business 
and Accountancy have a value of three hours, 
but may vary from one-half hour to nine. The 
normal load for a full-time student is fifteen 
hours per semester, with a maximum of sev- 
enteen permitted without special permission. 
A student wishing to register for more than 
seventeen hours per semester must seek the 
permission of the academic adviser and the 
appropriate dean once the drop-add period 
begins. Students wishing to take more than 
eighteen hours must petition the Commit- 
tee on Academic Affairs after consulting the 
academic adviser and the appropriate dean. 
Non-business or non-accounting majors wish- 
ing to take courses in the Calloway School 
must have met the specific courses' prereq- 
uisites and have perrr^ission of the instructor. 
Enrollment in the course is subject to space 
availability. 

Twelve hours per semester constitute mini- 
mum full-time registration at the University. 
(Recipients of North Carolina Legislative 
Tuition Grants must be enrolled by the tenth 
day of classes in spring and by October 1 in 
the fall for at least twelve hours. Recipients of 
Wake Forest scholarships and loans, as well 
as some types of federal aid, must be enrolled 
for at least twelve hours. Recipients of veter- 
ans' benefits, grants from state government, 
and other governmental aid must meet the 
guidelines of the appropriate agencies.) A 
student who feels that he or she has valid 
and compelling reasons to register for more 
than seventeen hours per semester must seek 
permission of the adviser and the appropri- 
ate dean no earlier than the first day of class. 
Only if both the adviser and the dean agree 



that the proposed course load is needed and 
in the best interest of the student will permis- 
sion be granted. 

The requirements for classification after the 
first year are as follows: 

Sophomore — completion of no fewer than 25 hours 

toward a degree; 
junior — completion of no fewer than 55 hours 

toward a degree; 
Senior — completion of no fewer than 87 hours 

toward a degree. 

Part-time Students 

A student may not register for fewer than 
twelve hours without specific permission 
from the appropriate dean to register as a 
part-time student. A student may not register 
for part-time status, i.e., fewer than twelve 
hours in a single semester, without specific 
permission of the appropriate dean prior to 
the last day to add a course. Approval for 
part-time status requires that students pay 
for such work on a per hour basis. Petitions 
for part-time status after the last day to add 
a course will be denied, except in the case of 
special circun\stances, and the student will be 
required to pay full tuition. Part-time students 
may be ineligible for campus housing unless 
an exception is made by the Office of Resi- 
dence Life and Housing. 

Class Attendance 

Attendance regulations place the responsibil- 
ity for class attendance on the student, who is 
expected to attend classes regularly and punc- 
tually. A vital aspect of the residential college 
experience is attendance in the classroom; its 
value cannot be measured by testing proce- 
dures alone. Students are considered suffi- 
ciently mature to appreciate the necessity of 
regular attendance, to accept this personal re- 
sponsibility, to demonstrate the self -discipline 
essential for such performance, and to recog- 
nize and accept the consequences of failure 
to attend. Students who cause their work or 



29 



PROCEDURES 



that of the class to suffer because of absence 
or lateness may be referred by the instructor 
to the dean of the College or to the dean of the 
Wayne Calloway School of Business and 
Accountancy for suitable action. Any student 
who does not attend classes regularly or who 
demonstrates other evidence of academic ir- 
responsibility is subject to such disciplinary 
action as the Committee on Academic Affairs 
may prescribe, including iirvmediate suspen- 
sion from the College or from the Wayne Cal- 
loway School of Business and Accountancy. 

Students who miss class, while acting 
as duly authorized representatives of the 
University at events and times approved by 
the appropriate dean, are considered excused. 
The undergraduate faculties are sensitive to 
the religious practices of members of the stu- 
dent body. At the beginning of the semester, 
students who will be absent from class for 
religious observances should confer with the 
instructor(s) about the date of the absence. 
The disposition of missed assignments will 
be arranged between instructor and student. 
Students anticipating many excused absences 
should consult the instructor before enroll- 
ing in classes in which attendance and class 
participation count heavily toward the grade. 
For policies pertaining to absences resulting 
from illness, please see the statement on the 
Student Health Service and class excuses in 
the Student Handbook. 

Auditing Courses 

When space is available after the registration 
of regularly enrolled students, others may 
request permission of the instructor to enter 
the course as auditors. No additional charge 
is made to full-time students in the College 
or the Wayne Calloway School of Business 
and Accountancy; for others the fee is $50 per 
hour. Permission of the instructor is required. 
An auditor is subject to attendance regula- 
tions and to other conditions imposed by the 
instructor. 

Although an auditor receives no credit, a 
notation of audit is made on the final grade 



report and entered on the record of students 
who have met the instructor's requirements. 
An audit may not be changed to a credit 
course or a credit course changed to an audit 
after the first official day of classes for each 
semester or term. 

Dropping a Course 

The last day in each term for dropping a class 
without a grade of F is listed in the calendar 
in the front of this bulletin. A student who 
wishes to drop any course on or before this 
date must follow the procedure prescribed 
by the registrar. After this date, a student who 
wishes to drop a course must consult his or 
her academic adviser, the course instructor, 
and the dean of the College or the dean of 
the Wayne Calloway School of Business and 
Accountancy, as appropriate. If the dean ap- 
proves the request, he or she authorizes the 
student to discontinue the course. Except in 
cases of emergency, the grade in the course 
will be recorded as F. 

If, at any time, a student drops any course 
without prior written approval of the ap- 
propriate dean, the student will be subject to 
such penalties imposed by the Conmiittee on 
Academic Affairs. 

Drop/add of Partial-semester Courses 

Students enrolling in classes beginning 
after the opening of the term and lasting for 
shorter durations, such as four, five or seven 
and a half weeks, may add those classes any 
time prior to the begirming of the class as 
space permits, and up to five days after the 
class begins, with permission of the instruc- 
tor. Students needing to drop such classes 
may do so for up to five days after the class 
begins, without a dean's permission. 

Withdrawal 

A student who finds it necessary to withdraw 
from the College or the Wayne Calloway 
School of Business and Accountancy must do 
so through the office of the appropriate dean. 



PROCEDURES 30 



With the approval of the dean of the College 
or the dean of the Wayne Calloway School 
of Business and Accountancy, no grades are 
recorded for the student for that semester, 
but the student's standing in courses at the 
time of the withdrawal may be taken into 
consideration when readmission is sought. 
If withdrawal is for academic reasons, fail- 
ing grades may be assigned in all courses 
in which the student is doing unsatisfactory 
work. A student who leaves the College or the 
Wayne Calloway School of Business and Ac- 
countancy without officially withdrawing is 
assigned failing grades in all current courses, 
and the unofficial withdrawal is recorded. 

Withdrawal from the College or the 
Calloway School carmot be finalized until 
ThinkPads, printers, connecting cables, WFU 
ID cards, residence hall keys (if applicable) 
and mailbox keys, along with any other per- 
tinent University property items, have been 
returned to the appropriate offices. 

Tuition, fees, room rent, and related 
charges will not be refunded for findings of 
responsibility within the undergraduate stu- 
dent judicial review process. Return of Title 
IV funds will be handled in accordance with 
federal law. 

Examinations 

Final examinations are given at regularly 
scheduled times. All examinations are 
conducted in accordance with the Honor and 
Ethics System adopted by the student body 
and approved by the faculty. 

Grading 

For most courses carrying undergradu- 
ate credit, there are twelve final grades: A 
(exceptionally high achievement), A-, B+, B 
(superior), B-, C+, C (satisfactory), C-, D+, D, 
D- (passing but unsatisfactory), F (failure), 
and I (incomplete). 

Grade of I. The grade of I may be assigned 
only when a student fails to complete the 



work of a course because of illness or some 
other emergency. If the work recorded as I 
is not completed within thirty days after the 
student enters for his or her next semester, the 
grade automatically becomes the grade of F. 
The instructor must report the final grade to 
the registrar within forty-five days after the 
beginning of that semester. 

NR. "NR" (Not Reported) is an administra- 
tive designation that indicates that a faculty 
member has not reported a grade. Unless a 
grade is recorded within forty-five days after 
the student enters his or her next semester, the 
NR automatically becomes the grade of F. 

Grade Points. Grades are assigned grade points 
per hour for the computation of academic 
averages, class standing, and eligibility for 
continuation, as follows: 



for each 
for each 
for each 
for each 
for each 
for each 
for each 
for each 
for each 
for each 
for each 
for each 



grade of A 
grade of A- 
gradeof B+ 
grade of B 
grade of B- 
gradeof C+ 
grade of C 
grade of C- 
grade of D+ 
gradeof D 
grade of D- 
grade of F 



4.00 points 
3.67 points 
3.33 points 
3.00 points 
2.67 points 
2.33 points 
2.00 points 
1.67 points 
1.33 points 
1.00 points 
0.67 points 
no points 



Pass/Fail. To encourage students to venture 
into fields outside their major areas of com- 
petence and concentration, the College makes 
available the option, under certain conditions, 
of registering in courses on a pass/fail basis. 
Courses taken under the pass /fail option 
yield full credit when satisfactorily completed 
but, whether passed or not, they are not 
computed in the grade point average. In no 
case may a student change from grade to 
pass /fail mode or from pass /fail to grade 
mode after the last date to add a course. 
The last date to add a course is noted in the 
calendar at the front of this bulletin. 



31 



PROCEDURES 



A student may count toward the degree no 
more than eighteen hours taken on a pass /fail 
basis. First- and second-year students are not 
eligible to elect the pass /fail mode, but may 
enroll for courses offered only on a pass /fail 
basis. Third- and fourth-year students may 
elect as many as twelve hours on a pass /fail 
basis, but no more than four hours in a given 
semester. Courses used to fulfill core, quanti- 
tative reasoning, cultural diversity, major, or 
minor requirements may not be taken on a 
pass /fail basis unless they are offered only on 
that basis. Courses in the major(s) not used for 
satisfying major requirements may be taken 
on a pass /fail basis if the department of the 
major does not specify otherwise. 

No courses in the Calloway School can be 
taken pass /fail unless they are offered only on 
that basis. 

Grade Reports and Transcripts 

An electronic midterm report and a final report 
of grades are available to students by the regis- 
trar in the fall and spring semesters. A final 
report of grades is issued for each summer 
term. 

Transcripts of the permanent educational 
record will be issued to students upon written 
request unless there are unpaid financial obli- 
gations to the University or other unresolved 
issues. Copies of a student's cumulative record 
are issued by the registrar. 

Under the law, the University has the right 
to inform parents of dependent students and 
certain other qualified individuals of the con- 
tents of educational records. 

Dean's List 

The Dean's List is issued after the end of the 
fall and spring semesters. It includes all full- 
time, degree-seeking students in the College 
and the Wayne Calloway School of Business 
and Accountancy who have a grade point 
average of 3.0 or better for a full-time course 
load in the semester and who have earned no 
grade below C during the semester. 



Graduation Distinctions 

Graduation distinctions are determined by 
the grade-point system and are based entirely 
on grades earned in Wake Forest courses. A 
degree candidate with a cumulative average 
of not less than 3.8 for all courses attempted 
is graduated with the distinction summa cum 
laude. A candidate with a cumulative average 
of not less than 3.6 for all courses attempted 
is graduated with the distinction magna cum 
laude. A candidate with a cumulative average 
of not less than 3.4 for all courses attempted is 
graduated with the distinction cum laude. De- 
tails are available in the Office of the Registrar. 

Repetition of Courses 

A student may repeat at Wake Forest a Wake 
Forest course for which he or she has received 
a grade of C- or lower. In this case, all grades 
received will be shown on the transcript, but 
the course may be counted only one time for 
credit. If a student fails a course previously 
passed, the hours originally earned will 
not be lost. For purposes of determining the 
cumulative grade point average, a course 
will be considered as attempted only once, 
and the grade points assigned will reflect the 
highest grade received. These provisions do 
not apply to any course for which the student 
has received the grade of F in consequence 
of an honor violation. Students seeking to 
repeat ENG 105 must petition the English 
department. 

Probation 

Any student who is placed on probation be- 
cause of honor code or conduct code viola- 
tions may be placed on such special academic 
probation as determined by the Committee on 
Academic Affairs. The Committee on Academ- 
ic Affairs may at any time suspend or place on 
probation any student who has given evidence 
of academic irresponsibility, such as failing to 
attend class regularly or to complete papers, 
examinations, or other work on time. 



PROCEDURES 32 



If poor academic performance is attribut- 
able to circumstances over which the student 
clearly had no control (e.g., serious injury or 
illness), the student may, after consultation 
with one of the academic deans, petition the 
Committee on Academic Affairs for further 
consideration of his or her status. 

In deciding whether to permit exceptions 
to the foregoing eligibility requirements, the 
Committee on Academic Affairs will take 
into account such factors as convictions for 
violations of the College honor code or social 
conduct code, violations of the law, and any 
other behavior demonstrating disrespect for 
the rights of others. 

Any student convicted of violating the 
honor code is ineligible to represent the Uni- 
versity in any way until the period of suspen- 
sion or probation is completed and the student 
is returned to good standing. Students who 
are on probation for any reason may not 
be initiated into any fraternity or sorority 
until the end of their probationary period. 

No student on social or academic probation 
or suspension from Wake Forest may take 
coursework at another institution and have 
that work transferred to Wake Forest for credit. 

Requirements for Continuation 

A student's academic eligibility to continue 
is determined by the number of hours passed 
and the grade point average. The number of 
hours passed is the sum of the hours trans- 
ferred from other institutions and the hours 
earned in the undergraduate schools of the 
University. The grade point average is com- 
puted only on work attempted in the under- 
graduate schools of the University and ex- 
cludes both non-credit and pass /fail courses. 
Students are expected to make reasonable 
and systematic progress toward the accom- 
plishment of their degree programs. To be 
eligible to continue in the College, students 
must maintain: 



for hours passed a minimum cum. GPA of 

fewer than 30 1.45 

at least 30, fewer than 60 1.60 

at least 60, fewer than 90 1.75 

90 and above 1.90 

Students are responsible for knowing their 
academic standing at all times. Any student 
whose GPA falls below the required mini- 
mum will have a grace period of one semester 
to raise the average to the required level. Stu- 
dents also have the option of attending sum- 
mer school at Wake Forest in an effort to raise 
the average. 

The Committee on Academic Affairs will 
suspend students who earn six or fewer grade 
points in any given semester in courses other 
than EDU 353; military science courses; MUS 
111-129 (ensemble courses); DCE 128; and 
elective 100-level courses in health and exer- 
cise science. In cases where failure was due to 
circumstances beyond the student's control, 
he or she may appeal to the Committee for an 
exception. 

Any student who is in academic difficulty 
is urged to seek advice and counsel from his 
or her academic adviser, from the Office of 
the Dean of the College, from the Learning 
Assistance Center, and from the University 
Counseling Center. 

A student who has or develops a health 
problem which, in the judgment of the direc- 
tor of the Student Health Service creates a 
danger to the safety and well-being of the 
student or others, may be required to with- 
draw until the problem is resolved. 

Requirements for Readmission 

The Committee on Academic Affairs over- 
sees the readmission of former students. In 
making a decision on whether to readmit, the 
Committee considers both the academic and 
non-academic records of the student. 

To be readmitted, a student must have 
previously attended Wake Forest University. 
Students who have been graduated with an 
undergraduate degree from the College or the 



33 



PROCEDURES 



Calloway School of Business and Accountancy 
may apply for readmission as post-graduate, 
unclassified students. 

Students who have been ineligible to con- 
tinue for academic reasons must present to the 
Committee an intentional plan to raise their 
academic standing to acceptable standards. 

A student who withdraws from the Uni- 
versity for medical or psychological reasons 
must submit documentation from his or her 
physician or therapist to either the director of 
the Student Health Service or the director of 
the University Counseling Center attesting to 
his or her readiness to resume a full academic 
program. The physician or therapist should 
also provide professional guidance to these 
directors as to the nature of the student's 
ongoing care once readmitted. 

Students whose withdrawals from the 
University were as the result of an honor or 
judicial conviction must satisfy fully any 
sanctions placed upon them prior to being 
considered for readmission. In addition to 
University-imposed sanctions, other non- 
academic grounds for denial of readmission 
may include violations of the law of the land 
and behaviors that have demonstrated dis- 
regard for the rights of others. 

Should a student, upon leaving the Univer- 
sity, fail to comply with the proper withdrawal 
procedures, "holds" may be placed upon 
his/her record that will prevent readmission 
consideration until such matters are resolved. 

Any readmitted student who hopes to 
receive transfer consideration for work done 
elsewhere must provide the University with 
a properly documented statement attesting 
to his/her good standing at the institution 
from which the transfer credit would come. 
Additionally, an official copy of the student's 
tianscript must be made available to the Office 
of the Registrar at Wake Forest University. 

No student on social or academic proba- 
tion or suspension from Wake Forest may take 
coursework at another institution and have 
that work tiansferred to Wake Forest for credit. 



Summer Study 

In addition to regular courses, a number of 
special summer programs for credit are de- 
scribed in the bulletin of the summer session. 

To be eligible to take summer courses at 
another coUege or university, the student 
must have a cumulative grade point average 
of no less than 2.0 and must obtain advance 
approval through the registrar's office, and 
in some cases, the Office of the Dean of Wake 
Forest College or the dean of the Wayne Callo- 
way School of Business and Accountancy. All 
tiansfer work taken after enrollment at Wake 
Forest must be taken in an approved four-year 
institution. 

Courses taken outside the U.S. require, in 
addition, prior approval from the Center for 
International Studies. Students must obtain 
a course approval form from the Center for 
International Studies. 

Transfer Credit 

All work attempted in other colleges and 
universities must be reported to the registrar 
of Wake Forest University. Students wish- 
ing to receive transfer credit for work to be 
undertaken elsewhere must have a cumula- 
tive grade point average of no less than 2.0, 
must not be on probation or suspension from 
Wake Forest, and must obtain departmental 
approval in advance. For entering transfer stu- 
dents, credit may be accepted from accredited 
colleges and universities, including two-year 
colleges. For enrolled Wake Forest students 
and students readmitted to Wake Forest, 
transfer credit is accepted only from approved 
four-year institutions. For transfer hours to be 
accepted, the grade in any course must be C or 
better. Courses completed at other colleges or 
universities with the grade of C- or lower are 
not awarded transfer hours in Wake Forest. 
(Refer to the Requirements for Degrees section 
of this bulletin for additional information.) 
A maximum of thirty-six Wake Forest hours 
can be earned from the Gymnasium, Lyceum, 
French Baccalaureate, or equivalent programs. 



PROCEDURES 34 



For students transferring courses on a 
quarter-hour system, semester hours may be 
assigned on the basis that one quarter hour 
times 0.67 equals one semester hour. No 
course may receive a higher conversion value 
than the value of the Wake Forest course. 

Applications for transfer credit from 
distance learning courses are evaluated on 
an individual basis. Only those courses ap- 
proved by the appropriate department chair 
are accepted. No more than six hours may be 
earned from such courses. It is the responsi- 
bility of the student to disclose to the registrar 
whether a class is a distance learning class. 
This does not apply to courses taken over the 
N.C. Interactive Video Network. 

Dual enrollment courses, college level 
courses taken at institutions other than Wake 
Forest, are treated as transfer credit so long 
as the given course meets the University's 
standard criteria for transfer credit. 

Independent Study, Individual Study, 
Directed Reading and Internships 

Such work is ordinarily reserved for junior 
and senior students in the undergraduate 
schools. Any student requesting approval 
for such a course must possess a cumulative 
grade point average of no less than 2.0 in 
Wake Forest courses. All such course requests 



must be approved by the appropriate depart- 
ment. The academic requirements should be 
completed during the semester in which a 
student is enrolled. 

The number of hours the student registers 
for in an independent study, individual study, 
directed reading, or internship course may 
not be changed during the add period unless 
approved by the sponsoring faculty member. 

Eligibility for Study Abroad 

To receive academic credit for courses taken 
outside the U.S. on an approved non-Wake 
Forest University program, students must: 

1 . Not be on probation or suspension 

from Wake Forest, 

2. Obtain approval of the program from 
the Center for International Studies 

before applying, 

3. Fulfill all required steps of the study 
abroad process as outlined by the 
Center for International Studies, and 

4. Attend a mandatory pre-departure 
orientation. 

No student possessing less than a 2.0 cumu- 
lative grade point average in either of the 
undergraduate schools will receive credit on a 
non-Wake Forest study abroad program. 



35 



PROCEDURES 



Scholarships and Loans 




ANY STUDENT REGULARLY ADMITTED 
TO WAKE FOREST COLLEGE WHO 
DEMONSTRATES FINANCIAL NEED WILL 
RECEIVE ASSISTANCE COMMENSURATE 
WITH THAT NEED. 



By regulation of the Board of Trustees, all 
financial aid must be approved by the Com- 
mittee on Scholarships and Student Aid. The 
financial aid program comprises institutional, 
state, and federal scholarship, loan, and 
work funds. Aid applicants must be enrolled 
as undergraduates or accepted for admis- 
sion. Full-time students are eligible to apply 
for institutional funds; other degree-seek- 
ing students are eligible to apply for federal 
funds. For financial aid purposes, full-time 
enrollment is defined as twelve or more hours 
each semester. A number of scholarships 
are based upon merit; need is a factor in the 
awarding of most financial aid. The annual 
calculation of need, and therefore the amount 
of an award, may vary from year to year. 

Additional scholarship assistance not listed 
herein is offered to student athletes through 
the Department of Athletics and is governed 
by NCAA rules. The Committee may revoke 
financial aid for unsatisfactory academic per- 
formance, for violation of University regula- 
tioris including its honor code, or for violations 
of federal, state, or local laws. Applications 
should be requested from the Office of Merit- 
Based Scholarships (P.O. Box 7305) or the Of- 
fice of Student Financial Aid (P.O. Box 7246), 
Winston-Salem, NC 27109, as appropriate. 



Policy on Satisfactory Academic 
Progress for Financial Aid Eligibility 

Evaluation of students' satisfactory academic 
progress for purposes of financial aid eligibil- 
ity is made annually at the end of the second 
summer session by the Committee on Scholar- 
ships and Student Aid, to determine eligibility 
for the following academic year. 

institutional Financial Aid 

The receipt of institutionally-controlled finan- 
cial aid requires full-time enrollment (twelve 
or more hours) during the fall and spring 
semesters and a minimum cimiulative grade 
point average of 2.00 on work attempted in 
the undergraduate schools of the University. 
Institutional aid generally is not awarded 
for summer sessions. Institutional aid is not 
awarded beyond the eighth (fall or spring) 
semester; this limit is prorated for tiansfer stu- 
dents. Certain institutional aid programs have 
higher academic and/or other requirements, 
which are communicated to recipients. 

Federal Financial Aid 

The Higher Education Act mandates that 
institutions of higher education establish 
minimum standards of satisfactory aca- 
demic progress for students receiving federal 
financial aid. Wake Forest University makes 
these minimum standards applicable to all 
programs funded by the federal government. 
To maintain academic eligibility for federal 
financial aid, a student must: 

Complete the requirements for a bachelor's degree 
within the maximum number of hours attempted 
(including transfer hours, but excluding 
advanced placement hours) of 168. This 
limit is the same for all students pursuing a 
bachelor's degree, including those students 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 3^ 



enrolled in joint bachelor's /master's de- 
gree programs. During a semester in which 
a student drops courses or withdraws, the 
maximum number of hours attempted 
includes those hours attempted as of the 
earlier of (1) the withdrawal date, or (2) the 
last day to drop a course without penalty 
(as published in the academic calendar). 

Pass at least two-thirds of those hours attempted 
during each academic year (including pass/fail 
courses, and hours attempted as a visiting or 
unclassified student) in the undergraduate 
schools of the University. The academic year 
begins with the fall semester and concludes 
with the second summer session. Incompletes 
count as hours attempted, unless from a non- 
credit course. Audited classes do not count as 
hours attempted. During a semester in which 
a student drops courses or withdraws, hours 
attempted include those hours attempted as 
of the earlier of (1) the withdrawal date, or 
(2) the last day to drop a course without pen- 
alty (as published in the academic calendar). 
For purposes of this policy, hours attempted 
also includes all instances in which a course is 
repeated. 

Maintain the following minimum cumulative 
Wake Forest University grade point average 
on all graded hours attempted (including 
incompletes from graded courses, but exclud- 
ing pass /fail courses) in the undergraduate 
schools of the University: 

For graded hours attempted. ..a minimum GPA of 



fewer than 30 


1.45 


at least 30, fewer than 60 


1.60 


at least 60, fewer than 90 


1.75 


90 and above 


1.90 



Thus, for example, a regular full-time student 
taking the normal fifteen hours of graded 
coursework each semester must achieve a 
minimum cumulative Wake Forest grade 
point average of 1.45 before the second year, 
1.60 before the third year, and 1.75 before the 
fourth year. 



In cases where a student repeats a course 
for which he or she has received a grade 
of C- or lower, the cumulative grade point 
average is calculated by considering the 
course as attempted only once, with the 
grade points assigned reflecting the high- 
est grade received. However, this provision 
does not apply to any course for which 
the student has received the grade of F in 
consequence of an honor violation. During 
a semester in which a student drops courses 
or withdraws, all graded hours attempted in 
the undergraduate schools of the University 
include those graded hours attempted as of 
the earlier of (1) the withdrawal date, or (2) 
the last day to drop a course without penalty 
(as published in the academic calendar). 

The policy of satisfactory academic prog- 
ress applies only to the general eligibility for 
financial aid consideration. There are other 
federally-mandated requirements a student 
must meet to receive federal financial aid. For 
instance, certain federal loan programs also 
require either the passage of a period of time 
or the advancing of a grade level between 
annual maximum borrowing, regardless of 
general eligibility for aid. Other general stu- 
dent eligibility requirements for a student to 
receive federal financial aid are listed in Fund- 
ing Education Beyond High School: The Guide to 
Federal Student Aid, a publication of the U.S. 
Department of Education. 

Denial of aid under this policy may be ap- 
pealed in writing to the Committee on Schol- 
arships and Student Aid and mailed to P.O. 
Box 7246, Winston-Salem, NC 27109-7246, or 
delivered to the Office of Student Financial 
Aid, Reynolda Hall Room 4. The Committee 
may grant a probationary reinstatement of 
one semester (in exceptional cases this period 
may be for one full academic year) to any 
student, upon demonstration of extenuating 
circumstances documented in writing to the 
satisfaction of the Committee. 

Examples of extenuating circumstances 
and appropriate documentation include, but 
are not necessarily limited to the following: 



37 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 



illness of the student or immediate family 
members-statement from physician that 
illness interfered with opportunity for satis- 
factory progress; death in family-statement 
from student or minister; temporary or per- 
manent disability-statement from physician. 

During a probationary period, students 
are considered to be making satisfactory 
academic progress under this policy and may 
continue to receive aid. A determination of 
satisfactory academic progress for any period 
of enrollment after the probationary period is 
made, upon the student's written request, at 
the end of the probationary period. Reinstate- 
ment after probation can be made only after 
the student has received credit for the appro- 
priate percentage of work attempted with the 
required grade point average. Any student 
determined ineligible for any academic year 
may request a special review at the end of one 
semester or summer term and may thereby be 
reinstated for all or part of the academic year. 
The student must request any such mid-year 
review in writing; otherwise only one deter- 
mination of satisfactory academic progress 
will be made each academic year. Reinstate- 
ment cannot be made retroactive. 

Scholarships 

The University's merit-based scholarship 
programs for entering first-year students are 
listed first and require separate application 
where noted. Other scholarship programs 
follow and generally do not require separate 
application unless noted otherwise. Students 
wishing to apply for any scholarship listing 
need as a consideration should complete the 
PROFILE application of the College Scholar- 
ship Service. 

The Nancy Susan Reynolds Scholarship is 
awarded to up to six extraordinarily capable 
entering first-year students. Made possible 
through the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, 
this scholarship annually covers the costs of 
tuition, fees, room and board, and includes an 
allowance for books and personal expenses. 



Scholars may receive up to $2,000 each sum- 
mer for approved travel or study projects. The 
Merit-Based Scholarships Application is due 
December 1. 

The Graylyn Scholarship is awarded to an enter- 
ing first-year student to recognize leadership 
and academic excellence. Made possible by 
the Graylyn International Conference Center, 
this scholarship annually covers the costs of 
tuition, fees, room, and board. Scholars may 
receive up to $2,000 at least one summer 
for approved travel or study projects. The 
Merit-Based Scholarships Application is due 
December 1. 

The Guy T. Carszvell Scholarship, awarded to 
entering first-year students possessing out- 
standing qualities of intellect and leadership, 
ranges in annual value from tuition to tuition, 
fees, room, and board. Scholars may receive 
up to $2,000 at least one summer for approved 
travel or study projects. The Merit-Based 
Scholarships Application is due January 1. 

The Deal Family Scholarship provides funding 
for the Carswell Scholarship program, with 
preference first to students from Catawba, 
Caldwell, Burke, and Alexander Counties, 
NC; second to other North Carolinians; and 
third to other students. 

The Gentry Family Scholarship provides fund- 
ing for the Carswell Scholarship program, to 
needy recipients. 

The Joseph G. Gordon Scholarship is awarded 
to up to seven entering first-year students 
showing exceptional promise and leadership 
potential who are members of constituencies 
traditionally underrepresented in the College. 
Made possible through the Z. Smith Reynolds 
Foundation and the University, this scholar- 
ship annually covers the cost of tuition. The 
Merit-Based Scholarships Application is due 
January 1. 

The Merit Supplemental Scholarship is awarded 
to entering first-year students showing 
exceptional promise and leadership potential 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 33 



who are members of constituencies tradition- 
ally underrepresented in the College. The 
Merit-Based Scholarships Application is due 
January 1. 

The Presidential Scholarship for Distinguished 
Achievement, valued at $11,200 annually, is 
awarded to up to twenty entering first-year 
students based on exceptional talent in art, 
commtmity service, dance, debate, entrepre- 
neurship, leadership, music, theatre, and writ- 
ing. A separate application is due December 1. 

The Annenberg Presidential Scholarship, as part 
of the Presidential Scholarships for Distin- 
guished Achievement program, assists stu- 
dents based on merit, exceptional talent, and 
leadership, with preference to students who 
express strong communication skills, such as 
in the areas of writing or debate. 

The Russell Brantley Presidential Scholarship, as 
part of the Presidential Scholarships for Dis- 
tinguished Achievement program, assists a 
student based on merit and exceptional talent 
in writing, with preference to creative writers. 

The Burchfield Presidential Scholarship, as part 
of the Presidential Scholarships for Distin- 
guished Achievement program, assists a 
student based on merit, exceptional talent, 
and leadership. 

The Ceruzzi Presidential Scholarship, as part 
of the Presidential Scholarships for Dis- 
tinguished Achievement program, assists 
students based on merit, exceptional talent, 
and leadership. 

The Steven & Laurie Eskind Presidential Scholar- 
ship, as part of the Presidential Scholarships 
for Distinguished Achievement program, 
assists a student based on merit, exceptional 
talent, and leadership. 

The Kitty Green Presidential Scholarship, as 
part of the Presidential Scholarships for 
Distinguished Achievement program, assists 
students based on merit, exceptional talent, 
and leadership. 



The Louise Pat ton Hearn Scholarship for 
Human Service, as part of the Presidential 
Scholarships for Distinguished Achieve- 
ment program, assists students who have 
demonstrated exceptional service to improve 
others' well-being and who show interest and 
potential in leading others to make similar 
contributions to humanity. 

The ]. Everett Hunter Family Presidential Schol- 
arship, as part of the Presidential Scholarships 
for Distinguished Achievement program, 
assists students based on merit, exceptional 
talent, and leadership, with preference to 
students with a strong commitment to com- 
munity service. 

The Hurst Family Presidential Scholarship, 
as part of the Presidential Scholarships for 
Distinguished Achievement program, assists 
students based on merit, exceptional talent, 
and leadership. 

The Milhaupt Presidential Scholarship, as part 
of the Presidential Scholarships for Distin- 
guished Achievement program, assists 
students based on merit, exceptional talent, 
and leadership. 

The Strobel Presidential Scholarship, as part 
of the Presidential Scholarships for Distin- 
guished Achievement program, assists 
students based on merit, exceptional talent, 
and leadership. 

The Thorkelson Presidential Scholarship, as 
part of the Presidential Scholarships for 
Distinguished Achievement program, assists 
students based on merit, exceptional talent, 
and leadership. 

The William Louis Poteat Scholarship, valued 
at $11,200 annually, is awarded to up to 
twenty entering first-year students who are 
active members of a North Carolina Baptist 
church and are likely to make significant 
contributions to church and society. Financial 
need is a significant factor in the selection of 
most recipients. A separate application is due 
January 1. 



39 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 



The Ben T. Aycock fr./Minta Aycock McNally 
Scholarship supports the William Louis Poteat 
Scholarship program. 

The Rev. Benjamin S. Beach Scholarship sup- 
ports the William Louis Poteat Scholarship 
program. 

The Rev. Edgar Douglas & ]ean Sholar Christman 
Scholarship, established by the Ministerial 
Council of Wake Forest University, supports 
the William Louis Poteat Scholarship program. 

The Cockman/Gore Scholarship supports the 
William Louis Poteat Scholarship program. 

The H. Max Craig ]r. Scholarship, established by 
Winfred Norman Hasty Jr., supports the Wil- 
liam Louis Poteat Scholarship program. 

The Nathan D. Dail Scholarship, established 
by Robert L. & Barbara D. Whiteman, sup- 
ports the William Louis Poteat Scholarship 
program. 

The Davis Poteat Scholarship supports the Wil- 
liam Louis Poteat Scholarship program. 

The Evans Family Scholarship, established by 
Ernest L. & Austine O. Evans, supports the 
William Louis Poteat Scholarship program. 

The W.D. & Alberta B. Holleman Memorial 
Scholarship supports the William Louis Poteat 
Scholarship program. 

The E. Glen & Joyce Holt Scholarship supports 
the William Louis Poteat Scholarship program. 

The Walter & Eva Reynolds Scholarship supports 
the William Louis Poteat Scholarship program. 

The Roy & Doris Smith Scholarship supports the 
William Louis Poteat Scholarship program. 

The Minnie & Fred Stone Scholarship supports 
the William Louis Poteat Scholarship program. 

The Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
(AROTC) Scholarships are awarded for aca- 
demic and personal achievement and pay 
annually an amount determined by the 
U.S. Army for tuition; a flat rate for texts. 



equipment, and supplies; and a subsistence 
allowance. Recipients must enroU and fully 
participate in Army ROTC. Four-year AROTC 
scholarships are applied for during the latter 
part of the junior or the early part of the senior 
year of high school. Two- and three-year 
AROTC scholarships are applied for during 
the sophomore and freshman years, respec- 
tively, through the Department of Military 
Science. 

The Dr. George E. & Lila C. Bradford Scholarship, 
valued at full tuition annually, is awarded 
to an outstanding entering first-year student 
with an intent and capacity to prepare for a 
career in medicine. Scholars may receive up 
to $2,000 at least one summer for approved 
travel or study projects. The Merit-Based 
Scholarships Application is due January 1. 

The Junius C. & Eliza P. Brown Scholarships 
assist needy and worthy residents of North 
Carolina, with preference to residents of 
Rockingham County, NC. For entering first- 
year students, the Merit-Based Scholarships 
Application is due January 1. 

The Robert P. & Dorothy Caldwell Scholarship 
is awarded to entering first-year students 
based on academic achievement, leadership, 
community service, and a commitment to 
helping others. A portion of these funds gives 
preference to needy students from Gaston 
and Catawba, NC, counties. The Merit-Based 
Scholarships Application is due January 1. 

The Gary Franklin Culler Scholarship is awarded 
to entering first-year students based on ability 
and leadership potential, with preference to 
students from High Point, NC. The Merit- 
Based Scholarships Application is due by 
January 1. 

The Egbert L. Davis Jr. Scholarship is awarded to 
entering first-year students from North 
Carolina demonstrating outstanding aca- 
demic performance, diligence, integrity, 
character, leadership, and reasonable athletic 
competence. Awards are renewable based on 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 



40 



a B average, exemplary personal conduct, and 
participation in the religious life of the Uni- 
versity. The Merit-Based Scholarships Appli- 
cation is due January 1. 

The George Foster Hankins Scholarships assist 
needy and worthy residents of North Carolina 
or children of alumni /ae living in other states 
with preference to residents of Davidson 
County, NC. For entering first-year students, 
the Merit-Based Scholarships Application is 
due January 1. 

The Heritage Scholarship is awarded to needy 
entering first-year students who represent the 
traditional constituency of the student body 
and who show outstanding academic achieve- 
ment or potential, a high degree of intellectual 
curiosity, the enthusiasm and courage to take 
advantage of a college opportunity, a sense of 
service and social responsibility, and perhaps 
special talent in some aspect of the liberal arts. 

The Holding Scholarship, valued at up to full 
tuition annually, is awarded to an entering 
first-year student from North Carolina (with 
strong preference to eastern North Carolina) 
demonstrating strong academic talent and ex- 
ceptional promise in civic leadership. Scholars 
may receive up to $2,000 at least one summer 
for approved travel or study projects. The 
Merit-Based Scholarships Application is due 
December 1. 

The Marcus C. Miller Scholarship is awarded 
to an entering first-year student who has 
demonstrated innovative use of information 
technology. The Merit-Based Scholarships 
Application is due January 1. 

The Leroy & Teresa Robinson Scholarship is 
awarded to entering first-year students from 
the high schools in Montgomery County, NC, 
based on academic achievement, diligence, 
integrity, character, and leadership. The 
Merit-Based Scholarships Application is due 
January 1. 

The K. Wayne Smith Scholarship is awarded 
to needy entering first-year students, with 



preference to residents of Catawba, Burke, 
Caldwell, and Alexander Counties, NC, and 
to children of full-time employees of OCLC, 
Inc. of Dublin, OH. The Merit-Based Scholar- 
ships Application is due January 1. 

The Zachary T. Smith Leadership Scholarship, 
established by the Z. Smith Reynolds Founda- 
tion, is awarded to needy entering first-year 
students from North Carolina with outstand- 
ing leadership evidence and promise, often to 
reduce loan expectations. 

The Kenneth Monroe Tucker Scholarship is 
awarded to entering first-year students, with 
preference to students from Wilkes, New 
Hanover, or Brunswick Counties, NC. The 
Merit-Based Scholarships Application is due 
January 1. 

The USX Scholarship is awarded to enter- 
ing first-year students based on academic 
performance and leadership, with preference 
to children of USX Corporation or its eUgible 
subsidiaries. The Merit-Based Scholarships 
Application is due January 1. 

The Wake Forest National Merit Scholarship is 
awarded to four entering first-year students 
selected by the scholarship committee. The 
annual value is $750, and can increase up to 
$2,000 based on demonstrated need. To be 
considered, students must designate Wake 
Forest as their first-choice college in the 
NMSC testing program. 

The O.W. Wilson Scholarship, valued at full 
tuition annually, is awarded to an entering 
first-year student with superior records and 
excellent potential. Scholars may receive up 
to $2,000 at least one summer for approved 
travel or study projects. The Merit-Based 
Scholarships Application is due December 1. 

The Page W. Acree Humanities in Science Schol- 
arship assists students majoring in chemistry, 
physics, biology, mathematics, or computer 
science, who have career objectives in medi- 
cine or science-related fields that require hu- 
man service, and who wish to take unrequired 



41 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 



academic work in the humanities. A separate 
application to the dean of the College is 
required. 

The Matthew James Alexander Scholarship assists 
needy students in the Wake Forest Dijon, 
France, program. 

The Henry M. & Ruth Williams Alford Scholar- 
ship assists needy students who have gradu- 
ated from the public schools of either the 
City of Clinton, Sampson Cotmty, or Duplin 
County, NC. 

The Charles 1. & Louise Allen Scholarship assists 
students planning medical careers, based on 
ability and need. 

The Alumni & General Scholarship assists stu- 
dents selected by the scholarship committee. 

The Theresa Mae Arnold Scholarship is awarded 
based on ability and need. 

The Camillo Artom Fund for Italian Studies 
assists well-qualified, needy students. A sepa- 
rate application to the provost is required. 

The Baker-Martin Scholarship assists needy 
students who have earned their high school 
diploma in North Carolina and whose parents 
(one or both) are employed in education or 
government. Preference is given to residents 
of Cabarrus or Nash Counties, NC. 

The Hubbard & Lucy Ball Scholarship is award- 
ed based on ability and need. 

The Bank of America Leadership Scholarship 
assists students majoring in the Calloway 
School of Business and Accountancy and the 
Department of Economics, with preference 
to needy students and to students who help 
achieve and sustain the diversity of the stu- 
dent body. Application is made through the 
Wayne Calloway School of Business and Ac- 
countancy and the Department of Economics. 

The Donald Alan Baur Memorial Scholarship is 
awarded based on leadership, dedication, 
competitiveness, and citizenship, with prefer- 
ence to members of Sigma Chi Fraternity. 



The Gaither M. Beam Sr. Scholarship is awarded 
based on ability and need, with preference to 
residents of Franklin County, NC. 

The George M. & Daisy Olive Beavers Scholarship 
assists one student on the basis of leadership, 
citizenship, and character. 

The James Wallace Beavers Scholarship assists 
first-year students and may be renewed for 
three years of undergraduate study. 

The Becton Family Scholarship assists a premed- 
ical student based on ability and need, with 
first preference to students from Augusta, GA, 
and second to other students from Georgia. 

The J. Irvin Biggs Scholarship is awarded based 
on ability and need, with preference to stu- 
dents from Lumberton or Robeson Counties, 

NC. 

The Blackbyrd Scholarship assists a chemistry 
major, with preference to the student having 
the second highest overall grade point 
average. 

The Jean Boatwright Scholarship assists students 
from middle income families, with preference 
to students who have exhibited strong com- 
munity service. 

The John W. Boatwright Scholarship is based on 
leadership. Need may be considered but is 
not a required or controlling factor. 

The Ann Levitt Brenner Scholarship, established 
by M. Van Brenner, Richard A. and Felice 
R. Brenner, and Lawrence M. and Sally B. 
Wolfish, assists needy students, with prefer- 
ence to females who do not receive an athletic 
scholarship. 

The B. Macon Brewer Scholarship assists under- 
graduate students. Need may be considered 
but is not a required or controlling factor. 

The Robert C. Bridger Jr. Scholarship assists a 
senior major in the Wayne Calloway School 
of Business and Accountancy, based on abil- 
ity and need, with preference to residents 
of Bladen County, NC. Application is made 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 42 



through the Wayne Calloway School of Busi- 
ness and Accountancy. 

The Thomas H. Briggs Scholarship assists de- 
serving students. 

The William D. Brigman Scholarship assists a 
student in the Wayne Calloway School of 
Business and Accountancy based on ability 
and leadership. Application is made through 
the Wayne Calloway School of Business and 
Accountancy. 

The H. Grady Britt Scholarship assists students 
in the Department of Biology. 

The Claude U. Broach Scholarship gives prefer- 
ence to students from St. John's Baptist 
Church of Charlotte, NC. 

The Gov. /. Melville & Alice W. Broughton Schol- 
arship assists a North Carolina student based 
on ability and need. 

The Paid Clark Brown Jr. Memorial Scholarship 
assists a needy student studying at the Wor- 
rell House. 

The Dean D.B. Bryan Memorial Scholarship 
is awarded based on ability and need to 
students planning a career in education. 
Recipients must work in the education field 
for a minimum of five years following gradu- 
ation or must repay the scholarship to the 
University. 

The Jack Buchanan Scholarship is awarded 
based on ability and need with preference to 
students from western North Carolina plan- 
ning a business major. 

The Julian W. & Martha B. Bunn Scholarship, 
established by Thomas W & Gail W. Bunn, 
assists needy North Carolinians attending 
the Wayne Calloway School of Business and 
Accountancy. Application is made through 
the Wayne Calloway School of Business and 
Accountancy. 

The Lib & Joyner Burns Scholarship is awarded 
based on ability and need, with preference 
first to students having a physical handicap 



and second to students from Forsyth or Guil- 
ford Counties, NC. 

The D. Wayne Calloway Scholarship assists stu- 
dents attending the Wayne Calloway School of 
Business and Accountancy Summer Manage- 
ment Program for liberal arts majors. Applica- 
tion is made through the Wayne Calloway 
School of Business and Accountancy. 

The John Douglas Cannon Scholarship assists 
first-year students based on ability and need, 
with preference to students from Rock Hill, 
SC. 

The James Lee Carver Memorial Scholarship 
assists needy students with preference to resi- 
dents of Oxford Orphanage in Oxford, NC. 

The J.D. Cave Memorial Scholarship assists a 
North Carolina male student who demon- 
strates character, a willingness to grow intel- 
lectually, and need. 

The Neal M. Chastain Memorial Scholarship as- 
sists a senior business major exhibiting ability 
and Christian ideals. Application is made 
through the Wayne Calloway School of Busi- 
ness and Accountancy. 

The Waldo C. Cheek & Evelyn K. Cheek Scholar- 
ship assists needy students. 

The Chi Rho Scholarship assists members of 
the Christian men's a capella group Chi Rho, 
based on merit, leadership, dedication to Chi 
Rho, and a strong commitment to Christ. 

The Cpl. Benny Gray Cockerham III Memorial 
Scholarship assists needy, well-rounded, 
dedicated students with a record of service to 
others, with preference first to students with a 
parent killed or permanently disabled during 
active military duty, and second to students 
with a parent in active military duty in the 
Marines, Navy, Coast Guard, Army, or Air 
Force. Recipients must maintain a minimum 
cumulative GPA of 2.5 to remain eligible. 

The W.H. & Callie Anne Coughlin Clark Scholar- 
ship gives preference to needy students. 



43 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 



The Cobb Foundation Scholarship is awarded 
based on ability and need, with preference 
first to students from Oxford Orphanage or 
other children's homes and second to stu- 
dents from Granville or Vance Counties, NC. 

The Elton C. Cocke Memorial Scholarship assists 
outstanding students majoring in biology. 

The Wake Forest College Scholarship assists 
students with satisfactory academic records 
and need. 

The Johnnie Collins III Drama Scholarship assists 
a first-year student showing promise for suc- 
cess in professional entertainment. 

The William & Susan Collins Scholarship assists 
students from the Commonwealth of Virginia, 
with preference to students from certain coun- 
ties and cities in southwestern Virginia. 

The Julius Harshaw Corpening & Julius Shake- 
speare Corpening Scholarship assists needy stu- 
dents, with preference to residents of Burke 
County, NC, and Lancaster County, SC. 

The Howard F. & Ruby C. Costello Scholarship 
assists needy students. 

The Cotman-Proctor Scholarship assists a needy 
student representing those students histori- 
cally underrepresented at the University. 

The O.B. Crowell Memorial Scholarship is award- 
ed based on character, need, and promise. 

The Carolyn & Ira Darnell Scholarship assists 
needy participants in the Army ROTC 
program, with preference to students with 
demonstrated leadership ability. 

The Eleanor Layfield Davis Art Scholarship assists 
a student with interest and ability in studio 
art, who has been recommended by the chair 
of the art department, to exemplify the talents 
and interests of Eleanor Layfield Davis. 

The Mrs. Paul Price Davis Scholarship assists 
North Carolina students, with preference 
to residents of Baptist Children's Homes of 
North Carolina. 



The Thomas H. Davis Business Scholarship assists 
a senior business major based on academic 
achievement, need, and potential for business 
leadership. Application is made through the 
Wayne Calloway School of Business and 
Accountancy. 

The Otis William Deese Presidential Scholarship 
is awarded to needy students as a supplement 
to the Presidential Scholarships for Distin- 
guished Achievement. 

The Robert H. Demsey Scholarship assists needy 
undergraduate students, with preference to 
business or accountancy majors. 

The John & Margaret Newett Dixon Scholar- 
ship assists needy students, with preference 
to students pursuing a master's degree in 
accountancy. Application is made through 
the Wayne Calloway School of Business and 
Accountancy. 

The Justus & Elizabeth S. Drake Scholarship as- 
sists an English major with ability and need, 
upon the recommendation of the English 
department. 

The Barry & Ann Griffin Driggs Scholarship 
assists juniors or seniors majoring in math- 
ematics, with preference to those with need, a 
meritorious academic record, and an interest 
in applied mathematics. 

The Kate Dunn-Florence Weaver Scholarship 
primarily assists North Carolinians, with 
preference to women whose college careers 
have been interrupted by causes beyond their 
reasonable control, and based on academic 
performance, diligence, integrity, character, 
and leadership. 

The Fred H. Duvall Scholarship assists needy 
students. 

The Dean Robert Dyer Scholarship Fund for Inter- 
national Students assists students from coun- 
tries other than the United States of America. 
Application is made through the Center for 
International Studies. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 



44 



The Eddins Family Scholarship assists students 
based on ability, character, integrity, leader- 
ship, and a desire to make a contribution in 
their communities, with first preference to 
residents of Stanly County, NC, and second 
preference to students from North Carolina 
and South Carolina. 

The Amanda Edwards Memorial Scholarship 
assists needy students with travel expenses 
for study abroad in the Wake Forest Venice 
program, with preference to students with 
demonstrated commitment to community 
service and volunteerism. 

The William Alexander Eliason Scholarship gives 
preference to needy students from AL, FL, 
GA, KY, NC, SC, TN, and VA. 

The Ernst & Young International Scholarship 
assists an accountancy student or rising ac- 
countancy student in the master of science in 
accountancy program. Application is made 
through the Wayne Calloway School of Busi- 
ness and Accountancy. 

The Douglas Esherick Scholarship assists a mem- 
ber of the Sigma Chi fraternity. 

The Eubank Scholarship assists needy students 
from low and middle income families and 
students who are in the first generation of 
their families to attend college. 

The James Grady Faulk Scholarship assists needy 
North Carolinians, with preference to resi- 
dents of Union County. 

The First Citizens South Carolina Scholarship as- 
sists needy students who have been residents 
of South Carolina for at least the previous five 
years before entering Wake Forest. 

The Theodore & Freda Fisher Scholarship assists 
North Carolina students with need and with 
grade point averages in the C and low B 
categories. 

The Bobbie Fletcher Memorial Scholarship is 
awarded based on ability and leadership to 
a female from North Carolina, possessing 
the qualities of kindness, thoughtfulness. 



unselfishness, patience, and determination. 
Preference is given to needy students. 

The Ralph L. Foust Scholarship assists needy 
and deserving students. 

The Lecausey P. & Lula H. Freeman Scholarship 
assists a needy non-senior whose home is 
within the West Chowan Baptist Association 
of North Carolina, with preference to Bertie 
County students. Residents of the Roanoke 
Association may also be considered. 

The Wallace G. Freemon Memorial Scholarship 
assists needy premedical students. 

The F. Lee Fulton Scholarship is based on leader- 
ship, citizenship, character, ability, and need. 

The James Walker Fulton Jr. Scholarship is 
awarded based on need and merit, with 
preference to students who meet one or more 
of the following conditions: North Carolina 
resident, evangelical Christian, member of 
Kappa Alpha, or varsity basketball player. 

The Caddy Scholarship assists needy North Car- 
olina students, with preference to residents of 
Anson, Union, and Wake Counties. 

The Lewis Reed Gaskin Scholarship is awarded 
based on ability and potential as a physician. 

The Daniel Eugene & Beulah B. Gatewood Schol- 
arship assists an undergraduate accountancy 
major based on merit and need. Application is 
made through the Wayne Calloway School of 
Business and Accountancy. 

The A. Royall Gay Scholarship is awarded based 
on scholarship, character, and high ideals, with 
preference to residents of Youngsville, NC. 

The James W. Gill Scholarship gives preference 
to students from Montgomery and Prince 
Georges Counties, MD. 

The Samuel T. Gladding Scholarship assists stu- 
dents based on merit, leadership, and com- 
munity service, with preference to students 
from Alabama. 



45 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 



The Eugene Basil Glover Memorial Scholarship 
is awarded based on ability and need, with 
slight preference to students from Halifax 
County, NC. 

The Wallace Barger Goebel Scholarship is based 
on ability and need, with first preference to a 
student interested in literature, second prefer- 
ence to a student interested in history, and 
third preference to a student enrolled in the 
premedical program. 

The Edward H. Greason Scholarship assists 
needy students, with preference to residents 
of Wake County, NC. 

The Kitty Green & Hobart Jones College Scholar- 
ship assists needy students. 

The George Washington Greene Memorial Schol- 
arship assists the rising senior in the Delta 
Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa who has the high- 
est academic average, upon the recommenda- 
tion of the chair of the Delta Chapter. 

The Kelley & Margaret Griffith Baptist Student 
Union Fund assists student members of the 
Baptist Student Union. 

The Stanley McClayton Guthrie Scholarship 
assists a needy student, with preference to 
students from Halifax County, VA, then to 
children of Wake Forest alumni. 

The David Hadley /Worrell House Scholarship 
assists a student in the Wake Forest London 
program who would incur excessive financial 
sacrifices without the scholarship. 

The John Locksley Hall Scholarship assists needy 
North Carolinians interested in business 
careers, with preference to intercollegiate 
athletes. 

The Fuller Hamrick Scholarship assists students 
from the Mills Home in Thomasville, NC. 

The George G. & Georgine M. Harper Scholarship 
assists students with potential and need, with 
preference to North Carolinians. 



The Henry Russell & Clara Stephenson Harris 
Scholarship assists a senior business major who 
plans to pursue a career in banking, based on 
ability and need. Application is made through 
the Wayne Calloway School of Business and 
Accountancy. 

The M. Elizabeth Harris Music Scholarship as- 
sists a music major, based on ability and need, 
with preference to a student whose primary 
interest is church music. 

The William R. Hartness Jr. Scholarship assists 
needy North Caroliaians. 

The Margaret S. Hasty Memorial Scholarship 
assists female students based on ability and 
need, and is renewable if the student places in 
the upper third of her class. 

The Thomas K. Hearn Jr. Fund for Civic Responsi- 
bility recognizes and promotes civic responsi- 
bility and leadership among students. 

The Robert M. Helm Leadership Scholarship 
assists participants in the Army ROTC 
program. 

The Paula S. Henson Scholarship assists stu- 
dents from the Appalachian region. 

The Elizabeth Hawks Herring Scholarship assists 
needy and meritorious students, with prefer- 
ence to sociology majors. 

The Hines Family Scholarship assists needy stu- 
dents, with preference to North Carolinians 
diagnosed with a specific learning disability 
as defined by the Individuals with Disabilities 
Education Act. 

The Hixson Fund provides assistance to stu- 
dents in the Wake Forest London program. 

The Frank P. Hobgood Scholarship assists stu- 
dents based on character, purpose, intelli- 
gence, and need, with preference to students 
who plan to enter the ministry, do religious 
work, become teachers or lawyers, the prefer- 
ence being in the order named, for the resi- 
dents of the Reidsville area recommended 
by the deacons of the First Baptist Church of 
Reidsville. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 4^ 



The J. Sam Holbrook Scholarship assists needy 
students. 

The Forrest H. HoUifield Scholarship assists 
upperclass students with evidence of char- 
acter and need, with preference to natives of 
Rowan and Rutherford Counties, NC, and to 
members of the Delta Nu Chapter of Sigma 
Chi Fraternity. 

The Murray A. Honeycutt Scholarship assists a 
needy male student. 

The Horton Family Scholarship assists needy 
students, with preference to North Carolin- 
ians with demonstrated serious academic 
ability and dedication, and commitment to 
civic or volunteer work or a particular talent 
in the arts or athletics. 

The Hubert Humphrey Studies Abroad Scholar- 
ship, based on need and merit, assists students 
in the Wake Forest programs in London, 
Venice, or Vienna. 

The M. Akers & Violet G. Hutchens Scholarship 
assists needy journalism minors. 

The Jeanette Wallace Hyde Scholarship is based 
on need and ability, with preference to female 
students from Yadkin County, NC, who are 
political science majors or are planning to 
pursue a career in social work or guidance 
counseling. 

The Stanton B. Ingram Scholarship assists needy 
students, with preference first to students 
from AL, and second to students from MS, 
GA, LA, TN, or FL. 

The Japan Foundation Grants for study in Japan 
are available through application with the 
Center for International Studies. 

The H. Broadus Jones Scholarship assists a rising 
senior student showing superior achievement 
in English and outstanding character. 

The Jones-Holder Business Scholarship assists a 
rising senior business major. Application is 
made through the Wajme Calloway School of 
Business and Accountancy. 



The Dyeann B. & Henry H. Jordan II Theatre 
Scholarship assists theatre majors. Application 
is made through the theatre department. 

The John Council Joyner Sr. Scholarship is 
awarded based on merit and need to a North 
Carolinian. 

The Rhoda C. & Davin E. Juckett Scholarship as- 
sists needy students with a GPA of at least 2.8. 

The Jay H. Kegerreis Scholarship assists continu- 
ing students having a 3.0 grade point average, 
high moral character, and a willingness to 
work diligently and to make personal sacri- 
fices to attend college. 

The J. Lee Keiger Sr Scholarship assists North 
Carolinians with preference to students from 
the ALLTEL-Carolina Telephone Company 
service region. 

The George Yancey Kerr & Albert Yancey Kerr 
Scholarship assists needy students. 

The Alice Caldwell Ketner Scholarship, estab- 
lished by Henry Ernest Ketner, assists needy 
students, with preference to males from 
Rowan and Cabarrus Counties, NC. 

The Connie Williams King Scholarship assists 
residents of Nashville, TN, or Davidson 
County, TN, with preference to needy 
students. 

The Kirkpatrick-Howell Memorial Scholarship 
assists members of the Sigma Chi Fraternity, 
or other students upon recommendation by 
the Kirkpatrick-Howell Memorial Scholarship 
Board. 

The Krahnert-Cantin Family Scholarship assists 
needy students, with preference to residents 
of North Carolina or New Jersey who have 
indicated that Wake Forest is their preferred 
choice. 

The Roena B. & Petro Kulynych Scholarship as- 
sists needy students, with preference first to 
students from Wilkes County, NC, and second 
to students from Avery County, NC. 



47 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 



The Kutteh Family Scholarship assists needy 
students with strong preference first to stu- 
dents from Iredell County, NC, and second to 
students from its contiguous counties. 

The Randall D. Ledford Scholarship assists phys- 
ics majors. 

The E. Carwile & Garnette Hughes LeRoy 
Scholarship assists needy students from Bertie, 
Chowan, Currituck, Dare, Hertford, Hyde, 
Gates, Martin, Northampton, Perquimans, Pas- 
quotank, Tyrell, or Washington Counties, NC. 

The Charles L. Little Scholarship assists students 
with ability and need. - . 

The Thomas D. & Betty H. Long Scholarship as- 
sists needy students, with preference to those 
from Person County, NC, and second to other 
North Carolinians. 

The Lowden Family Scholarship assists needy 
students with preference first to students from 
Montgomery County and second to students 
from Anson, Stanly, Davidson, Randolph, 
Moore, or Richmond Counties, NC. 

The Loxve's Food Scholarship assists students in 
the Wayne Calloway School of Business and 
Accountancy on the basis of merit and with 
preference to students from North Carolina 
and Virginia. Application is made through 
the Wayne Calloway School of Business and 
Accountancy. 

The MacAnderson Scholarship assists students 
studying a foreign language, preferably at 
a university in Europe. Application is made 
through the student financial aid office. 

The Dr. George C. Mackie Sr. Scholarship assists 
junior and senior premedical students based 
on need and merit. 

The Heather Ann Maier Scholarship assists 
needy Christian students, with preference 
to female students from MD, DE, PA, NJ, 
NY, CT, or the District of Columbia, who are 
interested in pursuing a career in a business- 
related field. 



The Elton W. Manning Scholarship assists stu- 
dents based on need and merit, with prefer- 
ence to students from eastern North Carolina. 

The Lex Marsh Scholarship assists North Caro- 
linians based on need and merit. 

The James Capel Mason Scholarship assists wor- 
thy students. 

The Burke M. McConnell Management Excellence 
Scholarship assists the senior in the Wayne Cal- 
loway School of Business and Accountancy 
with the highest grade point average. Appli- 
cation is made through the Wayne Calloway 
School of Business and Accountancy. 

The Wilma L. McCurdy Memorial Scholarship is 
awarded on the basis of character, academic 
standing, and need. 

The Thane Edward McDonald and Marie Dayton 
McDonald Memorial Scholarship assists a music 
student. Application is made through the 
Department of Music. 

The James McDougald Scholarship assists stu- 
dents first from Robeson County and second 
from Scotland County, NC, on the basis of 
leadership and ethics, academic preparation, 
desire, community pride, and financial need. 

The McGladrey & Pullen Scholarship assists a se- 
nior accountancy major based on merit, need, 
and interest in public accounting. Application 
is made through the Wayne Calloway School 
of Business and Accountancy. 

The Robert A. & Margaret Pope Mclntyre Schol- 
arship gives preference to students from Robe- 
son County, NC. 

The Bernard F. McLeod Jr. Scholarship assists 
students from middle income families, with 
preference to North Carolinians. 

The Medlin Scholarship assists students from 
middle income families with preference to 
North Carolinians. 

The Jasper L. Memory Scholarship assists 
students selected by the Department of 
Education. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 43 



The Ted & Nancy Meredith Scholarship assists 
art majors who are taking, or planning to 
take, courses or studies in studio art, and who 
demonstrate strong academic performance, 
diligence, integrity, character, and leadership. 
Need is a consideration but not a required or 
controlling factor. 

The Robert Lee Middleton Scholarship is awarded 
based on character, purpose, intelligence, and 
need, with preference to a student planning 
to enter the field of literature, accountancy, 
teaching, or the gospel ministry or other full- 
time religious work. 

The Mildred Bronson Miller Scholarship assists 
students based on leadership, dedication, 
competitiveness, and citizenship. 

The Gail Sawyer Moore Scholarship, established 
by Ernest Linwood Moore, assists North 
Carolina women. 

The Thomas E. & Ruth Mullen Scholarship, val- 
ued at $1,500 annually, is awarded through the 
Upperclass Carswell Scholarship Program to 
outstanding undergraduates with a minimum 
of one year of academic work at the Univer- 
sity. A separate application is due October 15. 

The Charlie & Addie Myers Memorial Scholarship 
assists preministerial students or students 
contributing to Christianity. 

The Hiram Abif Myers III Scholarship assists a 
senior from Roswell High School, Roswell, 
GA, who best exemplifies the ideals and 
characteristics of Bif Myers. The candidate is 
recommended by the Roswell High School 
principal. 

The R. Frank Nanney Scholarship gives prefer- 
ence first to students from Rutherford County, 
NC, and second to other North Carolinians. 

The George Thompson Noel, M.D., Memorial 
Scholarship is based on ability and need, with 
preference to students from Cabarrus County 
and North Carolina. 

The Norfleet Scholarships assist needy students. 



The North Carolina Contractual Scholarship, 
madeavailable by the North Carolina General 
Assembly through the State Contractual 
Scholarship Fund, is awarded to needy North 
Carolinians. 

The Nostitz International Travel Fund assists 
students from middle income families, who 
are studying abroad in a program approved 
by Wake Forest in London, Vienna, or Venice. 

The Gordon Alexander O'Brien Scholarship is 
awarded based on ability and need, with 
preference to students from Rockingham 
County, NC. 

The Curtis Eugene Overby Sr. Scholarship is 
awarded based on ability, need, and leader- 
ship to a North Carolina junior or senior ma- 
joring in communication, with an interest in 
broadcasting. Preference is given to students 
from Forsyth, Rockingham, and Caswell 
Counties, NC. 

The Dr. James Barry Douglas Palmer Scholarship, 
sponsored by the Bristol-Myers Squibb Com- 
pany, assists needy juniors with a cumulative 
grade point average of 3.0 or greater who are 
biology, chemistry or physics majors with 
special interests in biomedical or biological 
sciences. 

The Benjamin Wingate Parham Scholarship is 
awarded based on ability and need. 

The Parrella Family Scholarship assists needy 
students, with preference to students with a 
career interest in a health profession, and with 
preference first to students from the Bronx or 
nearby areas, second to students from New 
Jersey, third to students from states contigu- 
ous to New Jersey, and fourth to students 
from other middle Atlantic states. 

The Perkins-Prothro Foundation Scholarship as- 
sists needy Texas residents. 

The H. Franklin Perritt III Memorial Scholarship 
assists one or more rising sophomores en- 
rolled in the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, 



49 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 



based on leadership. Application is made 
through the Department of Military Science. 

The Thomas F. Pettus Scholarship is based on 
merit and need, with preference to North 
Carolina Baptists. 

The }. Robert Philpott Scholarship assists needy 
North Carolinians. 

The Dr. Dorn Carl Pittman & Betty Mitchell Pitt- 
man Scholarship assists students from middle 
income families, with preference to residents 
of Alamance County, NC, and second prefer- 
ence to students whose grandparent or parent 
is a Wake Forest alumnus. 

The Presidential Aide Scholarship is awarded by 
the Office of the President. 

The Mark Christopher Pruitt Scholarship assists 
a junior or senior premedical student and 
a member of the Delta Omega Chapter of 
Kappa Sigma Fraternity, based on need and 
merit. 

The H. Ray Pullium Scholarship is awarded 
based on ability and need, with preference 
to students from North Carolina Baptist 
Children's Homes. 

The Beulah Lassiter and Kenneth Tyson Raynor 
Scholarship assists students in mathematics 
and English. Application is made through 
these two departments. 

The Redwine Scholarship assists needy students. 

The Mark H. Reece Sr. Scholarship, established 
by John E. Reece II, assists needy students, 
with preference to student athletes participat- 
ing in a varsity sport. 

The Reifler Family Scholarship assists needy 
students with artistic ability, with preference 
first to students who have declared or intend 
to declare a major in studio art and second 
to students who have declared or intend to 
declare a minor in studio art. 

The Reinsch/Pierce Family Scholarship gives 
preference to students from northern Virginia. 



Need may be considered but is not a required 
or controlling factor. 

The Oliver D. & Caroline Revell Scholarship as- 
sists needy preministerial students or needy 
students entering full-time Christian service. 

The Revelle Family Scholarship assists needy 
students from Northampton and Hertford 
Counties, with second preference to students 
from other areas of northeastern North 
Carolina. 

The Reynolds North Carolina Scholarship, estab- 
lished by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, 
assists needy North Carolinians from middle 
income families. 

The William & Treva Richardson Scholarship as- 
sists undergraduate students. 

The Gerald & Stephanie Roach Scholarship 
assists up to four incoming students up to 
$4,000 each to replace loan funding, based on 
academic merit and need greater than $25,000 
per year, with preference to North Carolina 
residents. 

The Roy O. Rodwell Sr Scholarship assists a stu- 
dent each year up to the cost of tuition, with 
preference to North Carolinians. 

The George D. Rovere Scholarship assists a stu- 
dent planning to become an athletic trainer. 

The Joe & Frances Roivell Scholarship gives 
preference to needy and meritorious students 
from the Bristol, TN, area. 

The William Royall Scholarship assists classical 
studies students, with preference to students 
planning travel to classical sites. Application 
is made through the Department of Classical 
Languages. 

The Mike & Debbie Rubin Scholarship assists 
needy students with a declared or intended 
major in the College of Arts & Sciences. 

The William Lee Rudd & Ruth Crosby Rudd 
Scholarship assists worthy and needy students 
majoring in religion. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 59 



The W. D. Sanders Scholarship is awarded 
for language study in Germany or Austria, 
to sophomores, juniors, or seniors who 
have completed German 153 or above. The 
scholarship is designated in order of priority, 
for summer language study, semester or year 
programs with the Institute of European 
Studies (lES), or junior year abroad programs 
with other institutions. Application is made 
through the Department of German and 
Russian. 

The Scales International Studies Scholarship 
supports study outside the United States. 
Application is made through the Center for 
International Studies. 

The Mark Schurmeier 9/11 Peace Fund assists 
undergraduate students who are residents 
of the U.S., based on merit and need, with 
preference to students directly affected by the 
September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the 
U.S., or other victims of political, social, or re- 
ligious terrorism. The fund may also support 
student projects, travel, or academic studies 
dedicated to the reduction or elimination of 
terrorist activities and the promotion of peace. 

The John Aaron & Vida Lee P. Senter Scholarship 
assists North Carolinians based on ability, 
diligence, integrity, character, and leader- 
ship, with preference to residents of Harnett 
Coimty, NC, and active members of a Baptist 
church in North Carolina. 

The Emily Crandall Shaw Scholarship in Liberal 
Arts is made through the art, English, music, 
and theatre departments to a student who 
best exemplifies a diverse interest in litera- 
ture, art, music, and theatre. 

The Sara Jo Brownlow Shearer Scholarship is 
awarded to students specializing in areas of 
learning disabilities. 

The Franklin R. Shirley Debate Scholarship as- 
sists students with debate experience who 
successfully participate in the University's 
debate program. 



The Daniel R. & Barbara F. Shouvlin Scholarship 
assists students who help achieve and sustain 
the diversity of the student body. 

The Adelaide Alexander Sink Scholarship assists 
students from middle income families, with 
first preference to Florida residents who will 
help achieve and sustain the diversity of the 
student body, and second preference to simi- 
lar residents of other states. 

The Kester A. Sink Scholarship assists students 
from middle income families who are resi- 
dents of Surry County, NC. 

The John William Slate, M.D., Scholarship assists 
premedical students, with preference to those 
from western North Carolina. 

The Joseph Pleasant & Marguerite Nutt Sloan 
Memorial Scholarship is awarded to an applied 
music student based on ability and need. 
Application is made through the Department 
of Music. 

The Fred Smith Company Scholarship assists 
needy students from Johnston County, NC. 

The Ann Lewallan Spencer & Lewallan Family 
Scholarship assists needy children of alumni. 

The William K. Stamey Scholarship assists 
needy students from North Carolina and 
other nearby areas of the University's historic 
constituency. 

The William G. Starling Scholarship assists 
needy students based on their ability, charac- 
ter, integrity, leadership, and desire to make a 
contribution to the community in which they 
live. 

The C.V. Starr Foundation Scholarship assists 
needy students. 

The Gilbert T. Stephenson Scholarship is based 
on ability and need to a student from Kirby 
Township or Northampton County, NC. 

The Sigmund Sternberger Scholarship assists 
needy North Carolinians, with preference 
to students from Greensboro and Guilford 
Covmty, NC. 



51 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 



The John Belk Stevens Scholarship in Business 
assists senior business majors with particular 
interests in retailing or marketing. Application 
is made through the Wayne Calloway School 
of Business and Accountancy. 

The Edna & Ethel Stowe Scholarship gives 
preference to female students with a physical 
disability. 

The J.W. Straughan Scholarship assists needy 
students, with preference to students from 
Duplin County, NC, who are interested in 
pursuing a medical career (especially in the 
field of family practice). 

The Study Abroad Scholarship assists students 
with a minimum 3.0 grade point average 
through application with the Center for Inter- 
national Studies. 

The Robert L. Sullivan Fund may be used to 
assist students in the biology major. 

The Amos Arthur Sivann Scholarship assists 
needy students from Sevier County, TN, or 
other Tennessee counties. 

The Ralph Judson Sykes Scholarship assists North 
Carolinians based on need, moral character, 
and Christian fellowship. 

The Saddye Stephenson & Benjamin Louis Sykes 
Scholarship is awarded based on Christian 
character, academic proficiency, and need, 
with preference to first-year students from 
North Carolina. 

The Walter Low Tatum Scholarship in Mathe- 
matics provides in alternate years a renewable 
merit scholarship. The stipends of $500 each 
for the first two years are replaced by $5,000 
awards in each of the last two years, provided 
that the recipient fulfills the expectation to en- 
roll in and maintain a major in mathematics. 

The Augustine John Taylor & Roby Ellis Taylor 
Accountancy Scholarship assists accountancy 
students, with preference to students with 
a permanent residence within fifty miles of 
Winston-Salem. Application is made through 
the Wayne Calloway School of Business and 
Accountancy. 



The H. Howell Taylor Jr. Risk Management Schol- 
arship assists students interested in a career 
in risk management. Application is made 
through the Wayne Calloway School of Busi- 
ness and Accountancy. 

The Russell Taylor Scholarship assists an enter- 
ing first-year student with a distinguished 
record in citizenship and scholarship. Prefer- 
ence is given to students planning careers in 
the areas of religion or law, students exempli- 
fying positive principles of the Christian faith, 
needy students, and students from Iredell 
County, NC. 

The Tlwmas C. Taylor Scholarship Lund for 
International Studies assists accountancy 
majors studying outside the U.S., or studying 
international studies within the U.S., based on 
integrity, compassion, cooperativeness, and a 
record of academic achievement. Application 
is made through the Wayne Calloway School 
of Business and Accountancy. 

The Teague Scholarship assists needy students 
interested in entrepreneurship. Application is 
made through the Wayne Calloway School of 
Business and Accountancy. 

The Fred N. Thompson Sr. Scholarship assists 
needy students, with preference to residents 
of Virginia counties south and east of the city 
of Richmond. 

The Lowell & Anne Smith Tillett Scholarship as- 
sists students studying in, or whose residence 
is located in. Central and Eastern Europe, 
Russia, and other countries in the former 
Soviet Union. Application is made through 
the Center for International Studies. 

The Harold Wayland & Nelle Futch Tribble Schol- 
arship assists students with superior academic 
ability. 

The George Nelson Turner Scholarship assists 
students based on leadership ability and 
merit, with preference to those from North 
Carolina, who graduated from a public high 
school, who were academically ranked in the 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 52 



top third of the high school class, who lettered 
in a varsity sport while attending high school, 
and who participate in Christian religious and 
community service activities. Need is consid- 
ered but is not a required or controlling factor. 

The Tyner-Pitman Scholarship assists needy 
North Carolinians. 

The Captain Mario G. & Katrina Tanner Va^igeli 
Memorial Scholarship assists students study- 
ing Italian in the Department of Romance 
Languages. 

The Howard C. Vaughan Scholarship assists 
needy students, with preference to those from 
the North Carolina counties of Northampton, 
Gates, Chowan, Hertford, Bertie, Martin, and 
Halifax. 

The R. Stanley Vaughan/PricezuaterhouseCoopers 
Scholarship assists accountancy majors and 
students enrolled in the master's program in 
accountancy, with preference to fourth-year 
students. Application is made through the 
Wayne Calloway School of Business and 
Accountancy. 

The Venable Scholarship assists students with 
academic ability and leadership potential, 
with preference to descendents of Nora M. 
Venable. 

The Lindsay T. Wagstaff Scholarship assists 
needy students. 

The John D. & Bertha Wagster and Leon & Jimmie 
Ward Scholarship assists needy students, with 
preference to students from AL, GA, MS, NC, 
SC, TN, or VA. 

The Wake Forest Cultural Diversity Scholarship, 
established by Linda J. Gamble, assists stu- 
dents whose residence is outside of the U.S., 
based on academic ability and potential to add 
to the diversity and cultural awareness of the 
Wake Forest community. 

The Gerald C. Wallace ]r. Scholarship assists 
needy students from North Carolina, South 
Carolina, and Georgia. 



The Mitchell W. Wallace Scholarship gives 
preference to North Carolinians. Need is a 
consideration, but not a required or control- 
ling factor. 

The Brian James Watkins Scholarship assists 
students based on demonstrated leadership 
ability, community involvement, and charac- 
ter, with preference to students from North 
Carolina, Mississippi, and Delaware. 

The Watkins-Richardson Scholarship assists 
students from the southeastern U.S. with 
academic ability and leadership potential. 
Awards are renewable provided the recipient 
ranks in the top third of his or her class and 
continues to display leadership potential. 

The Weir Family Scholarship assists needy 
students. 

The J. Andrews White Scholarship assists deserv- 
ing students. 

The James G. White Memorial Scholarship assists 
needy students with academic performance in 
the upper half of their class. 

The Alexander Mines Whitley Jr. Scholarship as- 
sists qualified students. 

The A. Tab Williams Scholarship assists needy 
North Carolinians. 

The Graham & Flossie Williams Scholarship, 
established by James T. Williams, gives prefer- 
ence to needy students from Yadkin County, 

NC. 

The Jesse A. Williams Scholarship gives prefer- 
ence to deserving students from Union 
County, NC. 

The Leonidas Polk Williams Sr Scholarship as- 
sists students from Chowan, Camden, and 
Pasquotank Counties, NC, on the basis of 
merit. 

The John G. Williard Financial Aid Fund pro- 
vides scholarships to needy students. 

The John G. Williard Scholarship assists middle 
income students, with preference to students 
from Davie County, NC. 



53 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 



The James Bennett Willis Scholarship gives 
preference to needy North Carolina Baptist 
students interested in the ministry and Chris- 
tian education. Application is made through 
the Department of Religion or the Department 
of Philosophy. 

The Marie Thornton Willis & Miriam Carlyle 
Willis Scholarship gives preference to needy 
North Carolina Baptist students interested in 
music ministry. 

The Charles Littell Wilson Scholarship assists 
needy students. 

The Ellis & Helen Wilson Scholarship assists 
needy students, with preference to those from 
central Florida. 

The O.W. Wilson-Yancey County Scholarship as- 
sists needy students from Yancey County, NC, 
with excellent academic records. 

The Phillip W. Wilson/Peat Marwick Memorial 
Scholarship assists a senior accountancy major 
with demonstrated leadership skills, outstand- 
ing interpersonal skills, and a strong commit- 
ment to the community and the accountancy 
profession. The recipient must also be in the 
top fifth of his or her class based on a grade 
point average within the Wajoie Calloway 
School of Business and Accountancy. Applica- 
tion is made through the Wayne Calloway 
School of Business and Accountancy. 

The Dr. B.L. & Betty Terrell Woodard Scholarship 
assists needy students as part of the Hankins 
Scholarship program, with first preference 
to applicants attending North Johnston High 
School in Kenly, NC, second preference to 
residents of Johnston County, NC, third 
preference to residents of a county contiguous 
to Johnston County, and fourth preference to 
North Carolina residents. 

The William H. & Anne M. Woody Memorial 
Scholarship is awarded based on character, 
scholastic achievement, and need, with prefer- 
ence to students from Person County, NC, 
and to students intending careers in medicine, 
education, and ministry. 



The William Luther Wyatt III Scholarship assists 
needy students with interest and ability in 
biology, with preference to a male student 
entering the junior year. 

The Leon Wilson Wynne & Mary Ferebee Wynne 
Scholarship assists needy students, with first 
preference to residents of Martin County, 
NC, and second preference to residents of the 
North Carolina counties of Beaufort, Bertie, 
Camden, Chowan, Craven, Currituck, Dare, 
Edgecombe, Gates, Greene, Halifax, Hertford, 
Hyde, Johnston, Lenior, Nash, Northampton, 
Pamlico, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Pitt, Tyr- 
rell, Washington, Wayne, and Wilson. 

The Matthew T Yates Scholarship assists needy 
children of missionaries of the International 
Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention. Applicants should notify the Office 
of Student Financial Aid of their eligibility to 
be considered. 

Federal Financial Aid Programs 

The federal government, through the Depart- 
ment of Education, sponsors a number of 
aid programs for education. Among these 
programs are Federal Pell Grants, Federal 
Supplement Educational Opportunity Grants, 
Academic Competitiveness Grants, National 
Science & Mathematics Access to Retain 
Talent Grants, Federal Work-Study, Federal 
Perkins Loans, and Federal Family Educa- 
tion Loans (including Federal Stafford Loans, 
both subsidized and unsubsidized, and PLUS 
Loans). 

To receive assistance through these pro- 
grams, a student must complete the necessary 
applications, meet basic eligibility require- 
ments, and maintain satisfactory academic 
progress. 

Federal aid programs are described more 
fully in the Wake Forest University brochure 
"Undergraduate Need-Based Aid Informa- 
tion," and in the federal publication "The 
Student Guide," available upon request from 
the student financial aid office. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 54 



Exchange Programs and Scholarships 

The Italian Exchange Program, established with 
the University of Ca'Foscari in Venice, Italy, 
is offered to one student for two semesters or 
two students for one semester each. Students 
must apply for the fall or spring semesters 
of their junior year, or for the fall semester of 
their senior year. Application is made through 
the Department of Romance Languages. 

The French Exchange Scholarship, established 
with the University of Burgundy, France, 
assists a graduating senior who receives a 
two-semester graduate teaching assistantship 
at a lycee chosen by the French Ministry of 
Education. Application is made through the 
Department of Romance Languages. 

Loans 

The James W. Denmark Loan, established in 1875, 
assists qualified students. 

The Hutchins Student Loan assists needy students. 

The Grover & Addy Raby Loan gives preference 
to applicants from the First Baptist Church of 
Tarboro, NC. 

The Sidney G. Wallace Loan gives preference to 
students studying at a Wake Forest-sponsored 
or approved overseas program. 

Other Aid Programs 

Children and spouses of pastors of North Carolina 
Baptist churches receive an annual $800 conces- 
sion if they are the children or spouses of 
(1) ministers, (2) missionaries of the Interna- 
tional Missions Board of the Southern Baptist 
Convention, (3) officials of the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina, or (4) profes- 
sors in North Carolina Baptist colleges or uni- 
versities who are ordained ministers. Pastors 
themselves are also eligible. 

Children of other ministers who are not 
eligible for the prior concession receive an 
annual $150 concession if their parents make 



a living chiefly by the ministry and they have 
demonstrated need. 

Church Volunteer Scholarships of $200 per 
semester assist students wishing to mentor 
with a church near the Wake Forest campus. 
Application is made through the associate 
University chaplain. 

Ministerial students receive an armual $800 
concession if they (1) have a written recom- 
mendation or license to preach from their 
own church body and (2) agree to repay the 
total amount, plus four percent interest, in the 
event they do not serve five years in the pasto- 
ral ministry within twelve years of attendance 
in the College. 

The North Carolina Legislative Tuition Grant 
(NCLTG) is provided by the North Carolina 
General Assembly for students who are 
residents of North Carolina for the purpose 
of tuition payment under the terms of the 
Residency Manual of the University of North 
Carolina. Generally, these are students who, 
along with their parents, have been legal 
residents of North Carolina for at least twelve 
months prior to enrollment at Wake Forest. 
Certain other categories of students may also 
be eligible, including children of military 
personnel with North Carolina residency 
status who live out of state, residents who live 
near the state border, or residents who have 
recently moved out of state. Residency deter- 
minations are made by the aid office. Grants 
are reduced by twenty-five percent for those 
students having already completed 140 hours. 
Amounts on award letters are estimates, sub- 
ject to adjustment when the actual authorized 
grant is determined. Students are responsible 
for any difference between the estimated and 
actual amounts. 

To be eligible each semester, a student must 
enroll in a minimum of twelve hours (through 
October 1 in the fall and through the tenth day 
of classes in the spring), maintain satisfactory 
academic progress for federal aid eligibil- 
ity, and have not received or qualified for a 
bachelor 's degree. A student in the five-year 



55 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 



BS/MS in accountancy program is not eligible 
during the last year of that program. In ad- 
dition, a student must not be enrolled in a 
program of study the objective of which is the 
attainment of a degree in theology, divinity or 
religious education, or in any other program 
of study that is designated by Wake Forest 
primarily for career preparation in a religious 
vocation. Students (including those studying 
abroad) must submit an NCLTG application 
to the aid office by the end of the first week of 
classes of their first semester of each academic 
year. There are no exceptions to this deadline; 
students who are otherwise eligible but who 
fail to submit a timely application cannot 
receive NCLTG funding. 

The online application is made available by 
the state each year during the summer. Once 
available, students should download (from 
www.wfu.edu/finaid/forms.html), print, 
complete, sign, and return prior to the appli- 
cation deadline the NCLTG application to the 
Office of Shident Financial Aid, P.O. Box 7246, 
Winston-Salem, NC 27109-7246. 

Student employment is possible for part-time, 
on-campus and off-campus work, for a 
recommended maximum of twenty hours 
per week for full-time students. Summer 
employment may also be available. Interested 
students should contact the student financial 
aid office. Federal funding assists Wake Forest 
in its job location and development activities 
for students. 

Veterans' benefits are administered by the 
Department of Veterans Affairs in the Federal 
Biiilding at 251 North Main Street in Winston- 
Salem. Records of progress are kept by Wake 
Forest University on veteran and non-veteran 
students alike. Progress records are furnished 
to the students, veterans, and non-veterans 
alike, at the end of each scheduled school term. 



Outside Assistance 

Wake Forest encourages all students to apply 
for any outside assistance for which they may 
be eligible. Students must advise the financial 
aid office if they receive any assistance from 
outside organizations, including any local, 
state, and national scholarship and loan pro- 
grams. Once need is fully funded, aid award- 
ed subsequently from any source requires an 
adjustment of the original award. When need 
calculated under the federal methodology is 
greater than the total award, outside schol- 
arships are allowed to meet that difference. 
Any portion of outside scholarship exceed- 
ing remaining federal methodology need usu- 
ally results in an adjustment of need-based 
self-help (need-based loans and work oppor- 
tunities) and grant funds in equal portions. 
Recipients of scholarships meeting full insti- 
tutional methodology need, such as Brown, 
Carswell, Hankins, and Heritage, have their 
total awards adjusted by one-half the value of 
the outside scholarship. In no case may the to- 
tal aid award exceed the cost of attendance. 

Outside scholarship donors should include 
on the check the recipient's name and the 
term(s) for which the scholarship is intended. 
Checks should be payable to Wake Forest 
University (or co-payable to Wake Forest Uni- 
versity and the student) and sent to the Office 
of Student Financial Aid, P.O. Box 7246, Win- 
ston-Salem, NC 27109-7246. Checks delivered 
by donors to the student should be forwarded 
to the financial aid office. By submitting, or 
allowing donors to submit, checks to Wake 
Forest, a student gives permission for Wake 
Forest to write the Wake Forest University 
student identification number on the face of 
the check. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 



56 



special Programs 




STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE ARE 
ENCOURAGED TO APPLY TO SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS, BOTH ON AND OFF CAMPUS, 
WHICH COMPLEMENT THEIR ABILITIES 
AND INTERESTS. THESE INCLUDE THE 
PROGRAMS DESCRIBED BELOW AND THE 
SPECL\L DEGREES, MINORS, AND 
CONCENTRATIONS DESCFUBED IN THE 
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



Honors Study 

For highly qualified students, a series of 
iriterdisciphnary honors courses is described 
under the Courses of Instruction section of this 
bulletin. Under the supervision of the coordi- 
nator of the Honors Program, students may 
participate in three or more honors seminars 
during the first, sophomore, and junior years. 
Those who complete four seminars with a 
superior record and who are not candidates 
for departmental honors may complete a final 
directed study course. With a superior record 
in that course and a grade point average of at 
least 3.0 in all work, a student may be gradu- 
ated with the distinction "Honors in the Arts 
and Sciences." 

For students especially talented in indivi- 
dual areas of study, most departments in the 
College offer special studies leading to gradu- 
ation with honors in a particular discipline. 
The minimum requirement is a grade point 
average of 3.0 in all work and 3.3 (or higher in 
some areas) in the major. Other course, semi- 
nar, and research requirements are determined 
by each department. 



Open Curriculum 

For students with high motivation and strong 
academic preparation, the Open Curriculum 
provides the opportunity to follow a course 
of study planned within the framework of 
a liberal arts education but not necessarily 
fulfilling all core requirements for the degree. 
The Committee on Open Curriculum selects a 
limited number of students based on their pre- 
vious record of achievement, high aspirations, 
ability in one or more areas of study, stiength 
of self-expression, and other special talents. 
The course of study for the lower division is 
designed by the student and his or her adviser. 

Study at Salem College 

For full-time students in the fall and spring se- 
mesters. Wake Forest and Salem College share 
a program of exchange credits for courses 
taken at one institution because they are not 
offered in the curriculum of the other. An ap- 
plication for the Salem /Wake Forest Exchange 
Credit program must be approved by the 
academic adviser and the dean of the College 
or the dean of the Wayne Calloway School of 
Business and Accountancy. Except in courses 
of private instruction, there is no additional 
cost to the student. Grades and grade points 
earned at Salem College under the Exchange 
Credit program are evaluated as if they were 
earned at Wake Forest. 

Courses that are in the Wake Forest cur- 
riculum generally cannot be taken at Salem 
through this program. In very unusual circum- 
stances, a student may wish to seek the deans' 
assistance in appealing to the Conumttee on 
Academic Affairs. 



57 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



International 




Center for International Studies 

The Center for International Studies (CIS) 
provides information on study abroad pro- 
grams, international student and scholar ser- 
vices, and the international studies and global 
trade and con\merce minors. A complete list 
of services offered by the CIS can be foimd at 
www.wfu.edu/cis/. 

Study Abroad 

Students interested in studying abroad should 
visit the CIS for assistance and program infor- 
mation. All students planning to study abroad 
on a Wake Forest or an approved non-Wake 
Forest program are required first to attend 
an information session and then schedule an 
appointment with a study abroad adviser. For 
detailed information on study abroad, see the 
appropriate sections in this bulletin or visit 
http: / / studyabroad .wfu.edu. 

International Students and Scholars 

International students and scholars can obtain 
information and assistance in the Center for 
International Studies. 

Foreign Area Studies 

The Foreign Area Studies program enables 
students to choose an interdisciplinary 
concentration in the language and culture of 
a foreign area. For a full description of these 
programs, see the various listings under the 
Course of Instruction section in this bulletin. 



Opportunities for 

Study Abroad in Wake Forest Programs 

Austria (Vienna) 

Students have the opportunity to study and 
live at the Flow House in the 19th District of 
Vienna (northwest section of the city). Each 
semester or summer session, a faculty director 
leads a group of fourteen students and offers 
two courses in his or her respective disci- 
plines. Faculty directors are chosen from a 
wide variety of academic departments. In ad- 
dition, Viennese professors offer courses in the 
study of German language or literature, Aus- 
trian art and architecture, music, or history of 
Austria and Central Europe. Group excursions 
to Central Europe enhance the learning experi- 
ence as well as numerous integrative experi- 
ences within the city itself. Students selected 
for the Vienna program are required to have 
completed Elementary German (111-112 or 
113). Further information may be obtained 
from Larry West in the Department of German 
and Russian. 

Benin (Cotonou) 

Students who wish to study in Africa are in- 
vited to apply for the Wake Forest University 
program in Benin, West Africa. This three- 
hour course is designed for the study of the 
problems faced by African countries in the 
process of economic growth and development. 
Discussions focus on the examination of solu- 
tions to those problems. This is an approxi- 
mately five-week summer program (occur- 
ring usually during the first svmimer session), 
which combines classroom instruction, field 
trips, and a homestay. The program is directed 
by Sylvain Boko, professor of economics. 
Additional information may be obtained by 
contacting Sylvain Boko at bokosh@wfu.edu. 



INTERNATIONAL 53 



China (Beijing) 

Students who wish to study in China may 
apply to participate on the Wake Forest/ 
SASASAAS Program in Beijing. Offered in the 
fall semester, the program includes courses 
in both Chinese language and culture. It is 
open to students with no previous knowledge 
of Chinese or to those who wish to continue 
their study of the language. Additional infor- 
mation may be obtained from the CIS. 

England (London) 

A program of study is offered each semester 
at Worrell House, the University's residential 
center near Regent's Park in London. Courses 
typically encompass aspects of the art, theatre, 
literature, and history of London and Great 
Britain. (See, for example, ART 2320: English 
Art, Hogarth to the Present, and HST 2260: 
History of London, in the course listings in 
those departments.) Each term, a different 
faculty member serves as the director of the 
program, which accommodates fifteen stu- 
dents. Further information may be obtained 
from the Center for International Studies. 

France (Dijon) 

Students wishing to study in France may ap- 
ply for a semester's instruction at the Univer- 
sity of Burgundy. Under the direction of a fac- 
ulty residential adviser from the Department 
of Romance Languages, courses are taken at 
the University of Burgundy. A major in French 
is not required, but FRH 219 or its equivalent 
or any French course above the intermediate 
level is required. Additional information may 
be obtained from the Department of Romance 
Languages. 

Italy (Venice) 

Students wishing to spend a semester or 
summer in Italy may apply to study at Casa 
Artom, the University's residential center on 
the Grand Canal in Venice. Under the direc- 
tion of various members of the faculty, approx- 
imately twenty students per semester focus 
on the heritage and culture of Venice and 



Italy. Courses offered usually include ART 
2693: Venetian Renaissance Art; ITA 220: Ital- 
ian Conversation; ITA 213: Introduction to 
Italian Literature I; ITA 216: Introduction to 
Italian Literature II. Other courses offered by 
the faculty member serving as director. Stu- 
dents selected for the Venice program are re- 
quired to have completed elementary training 
in Italian. Limited scholarship aid is available 
to one or two students each semester to assist 
with expenses. Additional information may 
be obtained from Peter Kairoff, Department 
of Music. 

Japan (Hirakata) 

For students wishing to study in Japan, Wake 
Forest offers a fall and /or spring semester at 
Kansai Gaidai University. Located in Hira- 
kata, Kansai Gaidai is located near three of 
Japan's most interesting cities — Kyoto, the 
capital of Japan for 1,200 years; Osaka, the 
largest commercial city; and Nara, the ancient 
capital of Japan during the 6th century. 
Courses in a variety of disciplines includ- 
ing business, economics, political science, 
religion, history, art, and communication 
are offered in English. Japanese language is 
offered at all levels. No prior knowledge of 
Japanese is required. In the fall semester, a 
faculty member accompanies the students 
and teaches one course. Additional infor- 
mation may be obtained from the CIS. 

Mexico (Querela ro) 

The Wake Forest summer program in Quere- 
taro, Mexico, is located in a beautiful, colonial 
city northwest of Mexico City. This six-week 
intensive program in Spanish language and 
culture is based at the prestigious Instituto 
Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Mon- 
terrey. Open to students desiring to take be- 
ginning or intermediate level Spanish, the pro- 
gram provides students the chance to learn in 
an immersion setting. Visits to historical and 
cultural sites form part of each course. In ad- 
dition, students are paired with Mexican stu- 
dents to practice their Spanish conversation 



59 



INTERNATIONAL 



skills. A Wake Forest faculty member from the 
Department of Romance Languages accompa- 
nies the students and oversees the program. 
Majors in all disciplines are eligible to apply. 
Additional information may be obtained from 
Mary Friedman, Department of Romance 
Languages. 

Spain (Salamanca) 

Students wishing to study in Spain may apply 
for a year's or semester's instruction at the 
University of Salamanca. Under the direc- 
tion of a faculty residential adviser from the 
Department of Romance Languages, courses 
are taken at the University of Salamanca. 
As part of the University of Salamanca's 
special integrated program, students may 
take courses with Spanish students in the 
following disciplines: education, psychology, 
business, economics, biology, and anthropol- 
ogy. Students need not major in Spanish, but 
one course beyond SPN 213 is required. Ad- 
ditional information may be obtained in the 
Department of Romance Languages. 

Study Abroad in 
Non-Wake Forest Programs 

Students wishing to study abroad on a non- 
Wake Forest program must visit the CIS for 
assistance. The CIS maintains an on-line data- 
base of approved non-Wake Forest programs 
at http://studyabroad.wfu.edu. In addition, 
the CIS has a collection of printed materials of 
approved programs. All students planning to 
study abroad are required to attend an infor- 
mation session. The CIS staff advises students 
about their program options. Students will 
not receive credit for participation on any 
unapproved study abroad program. 



Course Approval Process. Once a student is 
accepted to a study abroad program, he or 
she must start the course approval process 
by scheduling an appointment with a study 
abroad adviser. In no case may a student 
undertake study elsewhere without complet- 
ing this process in advance to the satisfaction 
of the CIS, registrar's office, and the academic 
departments which oversee course credit 
approval. Students may not register for fewer 
than twelve hours or more than seventeen 
hours on a semester study abroad program 
without the permission of a dean. Department 
chairs approve specific courses and the num- 
ber of credit hours earned for those courses. 

Grades for approved courses on non-Wake 
Forest study abroad programs will appear on 
the Wake Forest University transcript, but will 
NOT be calculated into the Wake Forest grade 
point average. (See section on transfer credit 
in this bulletin.) Students must follow the 
drop /add policies of the host institution. If 
the program does not have any relevant poli- 
cies, then the Wake Forest policy is applied. 
If a student withdraws from a study abroad 
program, he or she must notify the registrar's 
office; the rules for withdrawal, as stated in 
this Undergraduate Bulletin, also apply. For 
more information, consult the CIS. 

Students may request to have scholarship 
and financial aid applied to approved non- 
Wake Forest programs. Scholarships for study 
abroad are also available. Additional informa- 
tion is available in the CIS and the Office of 
Student Financial Aid. 



INTERNATIONAL ^q 



Requirements for Degrees 




Degrees Offered 

The College offers undergraduate programs 
leading to the bachelor of arts and bachelor of 
science degrees. 

The bachelor of arts degree is conferred 
with a major in anthropology, art history, stu- 
dio art, biology, chemistry, Chinese, classical 
studies, cormnunication, economics, English, 
French, German, German Studies, Greek, 
history, Japanese, Latin, mathematics, music 
performance, music in liberal arts, philosophy, 
physics, political science, psychology, religion, 
Russian, sociology, Spanish, studio art, or 
theatre. 

The bachelor of science degree is conferred 
with a major in biology, chemistry, computer 
science, health and exercise science, math- 
ematical economics, mathematics, or physics. 

The bachelor of arts degree is available 
with a major in elementary education or edu- 
cation with a state teacher's license in social 
studies. The bachelor of science degree may be 
conferred in combined curricula in engineer- 
ing, environmental studies, and medical 
technology. 

The Wayne Calloway School of Busi- 
ness and Accountancy offers undergraduate 
programs leading to the bachelor of science 
degree with a major in accountancy, business, 
finance, or mathematical business. 

A student may receive only one bachelor's 
degree (either the bachelor of arts or the bach- 
elor of science) from Wake Forest. 

General Requirements 

The basic and divisional course requirements 
leave students in the College considerable 
flexibility in planning their courses of study. 
Students who entered under the bulletins of 
previous years may make use of new alterna- 
tive basic and divisional courses announced in 



this bulletin while still following their original 
contract for the required totals thereof. Except 
for HES 100 and 101, only courses of three or 
more semester hours count towards satisfy- 
ing basic and divisional requirements. 

Basic Course Requirements. There are five basic 
course requirements students must complete: 
a first-year seminar, two health and exercise 
science courses, the writing seminar, and a 
200-level foreign language course 

Divisional Course Requirements. Core require- 
ments complete preparation for more special- 
ized work in a major field or fields. Students 
select courses in each of five divisions of the 
undergraduate curriculum. 

Core requirements (basic and divisional com- 
bined) are typically completed in the first two 
years and the requirements in the major field 
or fields of study are completed in the junior 
and senior years. 

All students must complete (1) the core 
requirements (unless accepted for the Open 
Curriculum), (2) a course of study approved 
by the department or departments of the 
major, and (3) elective courses, for a total of 

120 hours. In general, no more than twelve 
hours toward graduation may be earned from 
among all of the following courses: MUS 111- 

121 and 128-129 (ensemble courses); DCE 128; 
and elective 100-level courses in health and 
exercise science. However, majors in music in 
liberal arts and music performance may count 
up to sixteen hours in these courses toward 
graduation. A cross-listed course may be taken 
one time for hours toward graduation, unless 
otherwise specified by the course description. 



^, REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 



All students must earn a minimum cumu- 
lative 2.0 grade point average in Wake Forest 
College and the Wayne Calloway School 
of Business and Accountancy. Of the 120 
hours required for graduation, at least sixty 
must be earned in Wake Forest programs. 
Once enrolled at Wake Forest, a student may 
subsequently count, at most, thirty hours of 
credit from sources other than Wake Forest 
programs toward the graduation requirement 
of 120 hours. Except for combined degree 
curricula, the work of the senior year must 
comprise courses in Wake Forest programs. 
Any exceptions must be approved by the 
Committee on Academic Affairs 

Transfer credits will not be used in 
calculating a student's GPA. This includes 
non-Wake Forest study abroad programs. 
However, transfer credits and the grade(s) 
earned will be recorded on the transcript. 
Graduation distinctions will be based solely 
on the Wake Forest GPA. 

A student graduates under the require- 
ments of the bulletin of the year in which 
he or she enters. However, when a student 
declares a major or a minor, the requirements 
for the major or minor that are in effect at the 
time of declaration will apply. Such require- 
ments may not be congruent with those 
stated in a given bulletin. If coursework is not 
completed within six years of entrance, the 
student must fulfill the requirements for the 
class in which he or she graduates. 

All requirements must be completed and 
certified before a student may participate 
in the commencement exercises. No further 
entries or alterations may be made toward 
the undergraduate degree once a student has 
been graduated. 

Seniors must submit an application for 
graduation for their records to be activated for 
certification. Information packets are mailed 
immediately before the fall term to all students 
classified as seniors. Students who are not 
enrolled in the fall term, or who do not receive 
the packet but intend to graduate within the 
academic year, may request one from the Of- 



fice of the Registrar. Application forms are due 
no later than thirty days before graduation. 

Core Requirements 

The core requirements are intended to intro- 
duce the student to various fields of knowl- 
edge and to lay the foundation for concentra- 
tion in a major subject and related fields 
during the junior and senior years. For these 
reasons, as many of the requirements as 
feasible should be taken in the first two years. 

Basic Requirements 

All students must complete five required 
basic courses (unless exempted through 
procedures established by the departments 
concerned): 

• FYS 1 00 (first-year seminar) 

• English 111 (writing seminar) 

• One 200-levei foreign language course 

• Health and Exercise Science 1 00 and 1 01 

Foreign Language Placement 

All students new to Wake Forest who have 
studied a foreign language in high school 
must complete foreign language placement. 
Students will not receive credit for a class at a 
lower level than the level of their placement 
on the placement exam, unless they: 

a. register for the class in which they placed; 

b. attend a few class meetings; 

c. consult with their professor; and 

d. successfully appeal their placement to the 
language placement appeals officers of the 
department and be reassigned to a lower level 
course. 

Students who continue with another foreign 
language must take a placement test in that 
one, too; if not during orientation, then before 
registering for a course in it. 

Students whose primary language (the 
language of instruction in the student's prior 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 52 



schooling) is other than English are exempt 
from the basic requirement in foreign lan- 
guage (literature) and must fulfill Division II 
requirements with courses whose readings 
are in the English language: English, classics, 
humanities (except those courses concentrat- 
ing on the literature of the student's primary 
language). 

Students whose schooling has been in 
English but who are fluent in a language not 
taught at Wake Forest must present college- 
level credit in the literature of the second 
language to be exempt from the requirement; 
the language review committee for interna- 
tional students decides in such cases. If the 
second language is taught at Wake Forest, 
the relevant department decides whether the 
student may complete the requirenient in that 
language or may be regarded as having ful- 
filled the requirement already. Elective cours- 



es in the language or literature of a student's 
heritage or countiy of origin are at the discre- 
tion of the department offering the course. 

Divisional Requirements 

All students must complete courses in each of 
the five divisions of the undergraduate curric- 
ulum (unless exempted through procedures 
established by the departments concerned 
or by participation in the Open Curriculum). 
Together with the basic requirements these 
courses form the core of Wake Forest's under- 
graduate liberal arts education. 

Students are not allowed to exenipt divi- 
sional core requirements through the Advan- 
ced Placement Examination, the College Level 
Examination Prograrri, or the International 
Baccalaureate. Although students who 
complete AP courses earn credit towards the 



Division 


Departments 


Number of 
Courses 
Required 


1: Humanities 


History 

Philosophy 

Religion 


2 


II: Literatures 


English Literature 
American Literature 

In English Translation (Classics, 
East Asian Languages and 
Cultures, German, Humanities, 
and Russian) 


1 


III: Fine Arts 


Art 

Music 

Theatre and Dance 


1 


IV: Social Sciences 


Anthropology 

Communication 

Economics 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 


2 


V: Math and Natural 
Sciences 


Biology 
Chemistry 
Computer Science 
Mathematics 
Physics 


2 



63 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 



120 hours needed for graduation, AP credit 
courses do not satisfy the core requirements 
as the student must complete the required 
core courses while enrolled at Wake Forest. 
Departments choose which courses will 
satisfy divisional requirements. Courses satis- 
fying a divisional requirement are designated 
(D) after their descriptions in this bulletin. 
Courses without the (D) designation do not 
satisfy a divisional requirement. 

Special Restrictions 

• In divisions requiring more than one 
course, students may not choose two 
courses from within the same department. 

• One course cannot satisfy the requirements 
of two divisions. A cross-listed course 
satisfies a requirement in one division only. 

• Language courses at the 200-level do not 
fulfill the Division II literature requirement. 

Additional Requirements 

To prepare students for the demands of tech- 
nology and globalization. Wake Forest guides 
undergraduate course selections with three 
further requirements: 

Cultural Diversity Requirement. All students 
must complete at least one course that edu- 
cates them regarding cultural diversity. This 
course may be taken at the basic, divisional, 
or major /minor level or as an elective. Cours- 
es qualified to meet this requirement are des- 
ignated (CD) after their descriptions in this 
bulletin. 

Quantitative Reasoning Requirement. All 

students must complete at least one course 
that requires quantitative reasoning, either as 
a qualifying course in Division V, as an elec- 
tive, or as a major or minor course require- 
ment. All courses meeting the requirement 
are designated (QR) after their descriptions in 
this bulletin. 



Requirement in 

Health and Exercise Science 

Students must complete HES 100 and 101 
before enrollment in additional health and 
exercise science elective courses, and in any 
case, before the end of the second year. 

Proficiency in the Use of English 

Proficiency in the use of the English language 
is recognized by the faculty as a requirement 
in all departments. A composition condition, 
indicated by cc with the grade for any course, 
may be assigned in any department to a stu- 
dent whose writing is unsatisfactory, regard- 
less of previous hours in composition. 

A student who has been assigned a cc 
receives a grade of "Not Reported" (NR) for 
the course. The student has one semester (un- 
derstood to be the next semester for which he 
or she is officially enrolled) in which to work 
in the Writing Center, revising the coursework 
to the instructor's satisfaction. Should the 
student fail to work in the Writing Center, 
or fail to revise the work to the instructor's 
satisfaction during the semester of his or her 
next enrollment, the grade becomes an F un- 
less some action is taken by the instructor. (If 
extenuating circumstances make it impossible 
for the student to make significant progress 
in a semester, the student may appeal to the 
dean's office for an additional semester of 
work to remove the NR.) Removal of the defi- 
ciency is prerequisite to graduation. 

Declaring a Major 

Most students declare a major in the spring 
of their sophomore year, and should earn at 
least fifty-five hours prior to the following 
fall term. Students declare a major through a 
procedure established between the academic 
departments and the registrar's office. Iitfor- 
mation about this process is distributed prior 
to the designated declaration period. 

If the student is accepted into the major, 
the department provides an adviser who as- 
sists the student in planning a course of study 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES ^ 



for the junior and senior years. A department 
that rejects a student as a major must notify 
the registrar's office and file a written state- 
ment indicating the reason(s) for the rejection 
with the dean of the College. 

Students who need to delay the declaration 
due to insufficient earned hours or other 
circumstances should consult the registrar's 
office. 

Students who have earned at least fifty-five 
hours prior to the designated declaration 
period and wish to declare a major should 
consult the registrar's office. 

A student wishing to major in accountancy, 
business, finance, mathematical business, or 
the master of science in accountancy should 
apply to the Wayne Calloway School of Busi- 
ness and Accountancy. (See the Wayne Cal- 
loway School of Business and Accountancy 
requirements in this bulletin.) 

The undergraduate schools try to pro- 
vide ample space in the various major fields 
to accommodate the interests of students. 
It must be understood, however, that the 
undergraduate schools cannot guarantee the 
availability of space in a given major field or a 
given course, since the preferences of students 
change and there are limits to both faculty 
and facilities. 

After the initial declaration, a student may 
not change from one major to another without 
the written approval of the departments con- 
cerned. The student's course of study for the 
junior and senior years includes the minimum 
requirements for the departmental major, 
with other courses selected by the student 
and approved by the adviser. At least half of 
the major must be completed at Wake Forest 
University. 

Please Note. For credit in the major, courses 
taken in many programs of study abroad are 
not automatically equivalent to courses com- 
pleted at Wake Forest. If a student wishes to 
take more than half of his or her courses 
for the major in study abroad programs, he or 
she must gain prior approval from the chair 
of the department. Students should check the 



Undergraduate Bulletin for additional depart- 
mental requirements for the major. Majors are 
listed alphabetically under Courses of Instruc- 
tion in this bulletin. 

The following majors are recognized: 

accountancy • anthropology • art history • biology 

• business • chemistry • Chinese • classical studies • 
communication • computer science • economics 

• education • finance • English • French • German • 
German Studies • Greek • health and exercise science 

• history • Japanese • Latin • mathematical business 

• mathematical economics • mathematics • music 
in liberal studies • music performance • philosophy 

• physics • political science • psychology • religion • 
Russian • sociology • Spanish • studio art • theatre 

Maximum Number of 
Courses in a Department 

Within the College, a maximum of fifty hours 
in a major is allowed within the 120 hours 
required for graduation. For a student major- 
ing in a department with two or more majors, 
six additional hours in the department but 
outside the student's major are also allowed. 

These stipulations exclude required related 
courses from other departments. For students 
majoring in English, ENG 111 is excluded. 
For students majoring in a foreign language, 
elementary courses in that language are also 
excluded. These limits may be exceeded in 
unusual circumstances only by action of the 
dean of the College. 

Options for Meeting Major Requirements 

To satisfy graduation requirements, a student 
must select one, and only one, of the follow- 
ing options, which will receive official recog- 
nition on the student's permanent record: 

1. a single major, 

2. a single major and a minor, 

3. a single major and a double minor, or 

4. a double major. 

In addition to these options, a student may com- 
plete the requirements of one or more foreign area 



65 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 



studies programs and/or any of the Romance lan- 
guages certificates. 

Double Majors 

A student may major in two departments in 
the College with the written permission of 
the chair of each of the departments and on 
condition that the student meet all require- 
ments for the major in both departments. A 
student may not use the same course to meet 
requirements in both of the majors. The stu- 
dent must designate one of the two fields as 
the primary major, which appears first on the 
student's record and determines the degree to 
be awarded. Only one undergraduate degree 
will be awarded, even if the student com- 
pletes two majors. 

Minors 

A minor is not required. Those students, how- 
ever, who select a single major — not those 
working toward a double major — may choose 
a minor field from among the following or 
from the listing of interdisciplinary minors: 

anthropology • art history • biology • chemistry • 
Chinese • classical studies • communication • com- 
puter science • dance • economics • English • French 
• German • German Studies • Greek • history ■ Italian • 
Japanese • journalism • Latin • mathematics • Middle 
East and South Asia studies • music • philosophy • 
physics • political science • professional education • 
psychology • religion • Russian • sociology • Spanish • 
statistics • studio art • theatre 

For details of the various minors, see the ap- 
propriate departmental headings in the sec- 
tion of this bulletin that lists course offerings. 

Interdisciplinary Minors 

Interdisciplinary minors are listed alphabeti- 
cally under courses of instruction in this bul- 
letin. The following programs are offered: 

American ethnic studies • cultural resource preser- 
vation • early Christian studies • East Asian Studies 



• entrepreneurship and social enterprise • envi- 
ronmental sciences • environmental studies • film 
studies • global trade and commerce studies • health 
policy and administration • humanities • international 
development and policy • international studies • 
Latin-American studies • linguistics • medieval studies 

• neuroscience • Russian and East European studies • 
urban studies • w/omen's and gender studies 

Foreign Area Studies 

The foreign area studies programs enable stu- 
dents to choose an interdisciplinary concen- 
tration in the language and culture of a for- 
eign area. An area studies concentration may 
include courses in the major and also in the 
minor field, if a minor is chosen. Foreign area 
studies programs do not replace majors or 
minors; they may supplement either or both. 
A faculty adviser coordinates each foreign 
area studies program and advises students; 
students who wish to participate in one of 
these programs must consult with the pro- 
gram coordinator, preferably in their sopho- 
more year. Questions also may be directed to 
the Center for International Studies. 

Foreign area studies are listed alphabeti- 
cally under Courses of Instruction in this bul- 
letin. Italian studies and Spanish studies are 
offered. 

Students who have studied abroad may 
have taken courses not listed in this bulletin. 
Questions should be addressed to the Office 
of the Registrar. 

Senior Testing 

All seniors may be required to participate in a 
testing program designed to provide objective 
evidence of educational development. If the 
Corrmiittee on Academic Affairs decides to 
conduct such a program, its purpose would 
be to assist the University in assessing the ef- 
fectiveness of its programs. The progran\ does 
not supplant the regular administration of the 
Graduate Record Examination for students 
applying for admission to graduate school. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES ^^ 



Combined Degrees 
In Medical Technology 

Students may qualify for the bachelor of sci- 
ence degree in medical technology by comple- 
tion of the academic requirements outlined in 
the following paragraph and by satisfactory 
completion of the full program in medical 
technology offered by Wake Forest University 
Baptist Medical Center. A grade of at least C is 
required in all courses taken in the program in 
medical technology. At least one year (twenty- 
eight hours) of the required academic work 
must be completed in the College. (Under 
current scheduling, successful candidates 
receive the baccalaureate degree in August 
rather than in May.) 

Students seeking admission to the program 
must file application in the fall of the junior 
year with Wake Forest University Baptist 
Medical Center. Selection is based upon rec- 
ommendations of teachers, college academic 
record. Allied Health Professions Admissions 
Test score or SAT/ ACT scores, impressions 
made in personal interviews, and work expe- 
rience (not essential, but important). Students 
must complete all core course requirements: 
BIO 112, 113, 213, 214 (three courses or equiv- 
alents); BIO 326; CHM 111/lllL, 122/122L, 
223/223L, 230 and 260; mathematics (one 
course); and electives for a total of eighty-four 
hours. Desirable electives outside the area 
of chemistry and biology include physics, 
computer science, and personnel and man- 
agement courses. (Interested students should 
consult a biology department faculty member 
during the first year for further information.) 

Degrees in Engineering 

The College cooperates with engineering 
schools in offering a broad course of study in 
the arts and sciences combined with special- 
ized training in engineering. A program 
for outstanding students covers five years 
of study, including three years in the Col- 
lege and approximately two years in one 



of the schools of engineering accredited by 
ABET, the Accrediting Board for Engineer- 
ing Technology. (Depending upon the field 
chosen, it may be advisable for a student to 
attend the summer session in the engineer- 
ing school after transfer.) Admission to Wake 
Forest does not guarantee admission to the 
engineering school. Those decisions are based 
on the student's transcript, performance, and 
status at the time of application. Upon suc- 
cessful completion of the five years of study, 
the student receives the bachelor of science 
degree in engineering from the University 
and the bachelor of science degree in one of 
the specialized engineering fields from the 
engineering school. 

The curriculum for the first three years 
must include all the core requirements and 
additional courses in science and mathematics 
which will prepare the student for the study 
of engineering, such as MTH 111, 112, 251, 
301, 302, and 304; PHY 113, 114, 215, 262, 265, 
and 266; CHM 111, lllL, 122, and 122L; and 
ECN 150. 

These electives are chosen in consultation 
with the chair of the Department of Physics. 

Five-year Cooperative Degree 
Program in Latin-American Studies 

Wake Forest and Georgetown universities 
have instituted a five-year cooperative degree 
program in Latin- American Studies. Under 
this program, undergraduate students who 
minor in Latin- American Studies may ap- 
ply to have a limited number of hours from 
their undergraduate work count toward a 
master's degree in La tin- American Studies at 
Georgetown University in Washington, DC. 
The BA is awarded by Wake Forest, while the 
master's degree is awarded by Georgetown. 
Those whose applications are accepted may 
complete both their BA and MA degrees in a 
five-year period. To apply for the combined 
BA/MA, students should declare an interest 
in the five-year cooperative degree program 
during their junior year. Students must then 



67 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 



complete the regular Georgetown graduate 
application process and seek formal accep- 
tance to the MA program during their senior 
year. 

The five-year program is an opportunity 
for exceptional students to complete degree 
requirements at an accelerated pace. Inter- 
ested students should contact the five-year 
degree program coordinator, Peter Siavelis, 
associate professor of political science. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 



Courses of Instruction 




PLANS OF STUDY, COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, AND THE IDENTIFICATION OF 
INSTRUCTORS APPLY TO THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2006-2007 UNLESS OTHERWISE 
NOTED, AND REFLECT OFFICIAL FACULTY ACTION THROUGH FEBRUARY 12, 2007. 

The University reserves the right to change programs of study, academic requirements, assign- 
ment of lecturers, or the announced calendar. The courses listed in this bulletin are not neces- 
sarily taught every year; their availability is a function of both staffing constraints and student 
demand. While no guarantees about future scheduling can be made, students are encouraged 
to alert their advisers and department heads to their needs and desires as soon as they can be 
foreseen. For an exact list of courses offered in each particular semester and summer, students 
should consult the course schedules issued by the Office of the Registrar during the preceding 
term. 

Abbreviations Found in Course Descriptions 

(#h) Indicates the number of hours earned for successful connpletion of the course. 

Follows the course title. 

P — A course requires one or more prerequisite courses. 

C — A course requires one or more corequisite courses. 

P — POI Permission of the instructor is required for registration. 

P — POD Permission of the department is required for registration. 

(CD) A course satisfies the cultural diversity requirement. 

(D) A course satisfies a divisional requirement. 

(QR) A course satisfies the quantitative reasoning requirement. 

Courses 101-199 are primarily for first-year students and sophomores; courses 200-299 are 
primarily for juniors and seniors; courses 301-399 are for advanced undergraduate students. 
Graduate courses are described in the bulletin of the Graduate School. 



69 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



American Ethnic Studies (AES) 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 

Director Rubin Professor of American Ethnic Studies and Professor of Sociology Earl Snnith 
Adjunct Professor Ofer A. Zmiri 
Adjunct Lecturer Beth Hopkins 

The interdisciplinary minor in American ethnic studies requires 18 hours. The student must take 
AES 151. Race and Ethnic Diversity in America, during the second or third year at Wake For- 
est, and AES 234. Ethnicity and hnmigration. At least one additional three-hour course must 
be taken from the behavioral and social sciences, and one from the humanities. This structure 
gives students an understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of American ethnic studies 
within the context of the traditional liberal arts curriculum. 

151. Race and Ethnic Diversity in America. (3h) Different race and ethnic experiences are exam- 
ined through an institutional approach that examines religion, work, schooling, marriage pat- 
terns, and culture from a cross-cultural perspective. Grand theoretical schemes like the "melting 
pot" are critiqued for their relevance in an age of new cultural expectations among the many 
American ethnic groups. (CD) 

232. The American Jewish Experience. (3h) Interdisciplinary course exploring Jewish immigra- 
tion to America with a primary focus on the nineteenth and tAventieth centuries. 

234. Ethnicity and Immigration. (3h) Exploration of the socio-historical dynamics of the peopling 
of America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (CD) 

240. Asian-American Legacy: A Social History of Community Adaptation. (3h) Introduction to the 
history, culture, and literature of the Asian-American communities, exploring issues of migra- 
tion, assimilation, and the process of developing Asian- American identities in the twentieth and 
early twenty-first centuries. Also listed as SOC 240. (CD) 

310. Race, Class, and Gender in a Color-blind Society. (3h) Examination of issues surrounding 
race, class, and gender in the U.S. Topics include income and wealth, theories of discrimination, 
public education, gender bias, and patterns of occupational and industrial segregation. Also 
listed as EDU 310. 

357. Studies in Chicano Literature. (3h) Writings by Americans of Mexican descent in relation to 
politics and history. Readings in literature, literary criticism, and socio-cultural analysis. Also 
listed as ENG 357. (CD) 

358. The Italian Experience in America. (3h) Explores issues of ethnicity and identity in the 
Italian- American experience. A central goal is to understand the inter-relationship of social, 
economic and political factors that impinge on this large European ethnic group. 

387. African-American Fiction. (3h) Selected topics in the development of fiction by American 
writers of African descent. Also listed as ENG 387. (CD) 

389. African-American Poetry. (3h) Readings of works by American poets of African descent in 
theoretical, critical, and historical contexts. Also listed as ENG 389. (CD) 



AMERICAN ETHNIC STUDIES 79 



396. Independent Study. (l-3h) Independent projects in American Ethnic Studies which either 
continue study begun in regular course or develop new areas of interest. A maximum of 3 
hours may apply to the minor. By prearrangement. 

Electives for Annerican Ethnic Studies 

Additional elective courses may have been approved since publication of this bulletin. The 
program director maintains a complete list of all approved elective courses. For course descrip- 
tions, see the relevant department's listings in this bulletin. 

ANT 374. Prehistory of North America. (3h) 

377. Ancestors, Indians, Immigrants: A Southwest Cultural Tapestry. (3h) 
COM 330. Communication and Conflict. (3h) 

340. American Rhetorical Movements to 1900. (3h) 

341. American Rhetorical Movements since 1900. (3h) 

350. Intercultural Communication. (3h) 
ECN 246. Urban Economics. (3h) 

273. Economics for a Multicultural Future. (3h) 
EDU 305. The Sociology of Education. (3h) 
ENG 377. American Jewish Literature. (3h) 

379. Literary Forms of the American Personal Narrative. (3h) 

381. Studies in African-American Literature. (3h) 
HMN 285. Culture and Religion in Contemporary Native America. (3h) 
HST 240. African- American History (3h) 

351. U.S. Social History I. (3h) 

352. U.S. Social History II. (3h) 

376. Civil Rights and Black Consciousness Movements. (3h) 
MUS 203. History of Jazz. (3h) 

207. American Music. (3h) 
POL 223. Blacks in American Politics. (3h) 
PSY 357. Cross-Cultural Psychology (3h) 

364. Prejudice, Discrimination, Racism, and Heterosexism. (3h) 
REL 103. Intioduction to the Christian Tradition. (3h) 
SOC 348. Sociology of the Family (3h) 
359. Race and Ethnic Relations. (3h) 
361. Sociology of African- American Families. (3h) 
WGS 377. Special Topics: "Ethnohistory of Native- American Women." (3h) 

(for spring 2006 and any subsequent semester in which this topic is taught) 



71 



AMERICAN ETHNIC STUDIES 



Anthropology (ANT) 



Chair Jeanne M. Simonelli 

Professors Jay Kaplan, Jeanne M. Sinnonelli 

Director, Museum of Anthropology and Adjunct Associate Professor Stephen Whittington 

Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Fellow and Associate Professor Margaret Bender 

Assistant Professors Ellen Miller, Paul Thacker 

Lecturer Steven Folmar 

Visiting Assistant Professor Eric E. Bowne 

Adjunct Instructors Beverlye H. Hancock, Kenneth Robinson 

A major in anthropology requires a minimum of thirty-three credit hours and must include ANT 
112, 113, 114, 340, 390, and one course from each of the following three groups: 

Methods— 305, 307, 315, 342, 353, 354, 368, 378, 380, 381, 382, 383, 384, 387 

Subfield Topics— 150, 264, 301, 332, 333, 336, 337, 339, 355, 361, 362, 363, 366, 385 

Area— 111, 210, 313, 330, 334, 358, 370, 374, 377; plus the equivalent of two to three 
more full semester courses in anthropology, one of which may be a cognate discipline. 

Students are encouraged, but not required, to enroll in a course offering intensive field research 
training. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in anthropology courses is required at the time 
the major is declared. A minimum grade of C in all anthropology courses counted toward the 
major is required for graduation. 

A minor in anthropology requires eighteen hours and must include ANT 112, 113, and 114. Only 
one course (excluding ANT 112, 113, 114) can be taken under the pass/fail option and used to 
meet minor requirements. Only three hours from ANT 398, 399 may be used toward the minor. 
Only three hours from ANT 353, 354, 381, 382, 383, and 384 may be used to meet minor require- 
ments and departmental permission must be obtained for minor credit in these courses. 

Honors. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Anthropology," highly qualified ma- 
jors (3.5 grade point average in anthropology) should apply to the department for adnussion to 
the honors program. Honors students must complete a senior research project, document their 
research, and satisfactorily defend their work in an oral examination. For additional informa- 
tion, members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

111. Peoples and Cultures of the World. (3h) A representative ethnographic survey of world 
cultures, including hunting-gathering, kin-based, and agricultural societies, as well as ethnic 
groups in complex societies. (CD, D) 

112. Introduction to Archaeology. (3h) An overview of world prehistory, from the earliest stone 
tools to the appearance of civilization, with an emphasis on the relationship between culture 
change and the natural environment. (D) 

113. Introduction to Biological Anthropology. (3h) Introduction to biological anthropology, inclu- 
ding human biology, human variation, human genetics, human evolution, and primatology. (D) 

114. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. (3h) Investigates and interprets the historic cultural 
diversity of the world's peoples, through an understanding of economic, social, and political 



ANTHROPOLOGY 72 



systems; law and order, ritual, symbol, and religion; language and culture; kinship and the fam- 
ily; and modernization and culture change. (CD, D) 

150. Introduction to Linguistics. (3h) The social phenomenon of language: how it originated and 
developed, how it is learned and used, its relationship to other kinds of behavior; types of lan- 
guage (oral, written, signed) and language families; analysis of linguistic data; and social issues 
of language use. Also listed as LIN 150. (CD, D) 

210. Introduction to Latin-American Studies. (3h) Introduction to the historical, economic, cul- 
tural, and social issues which shape Latin America. Also listed as LAS 210. (CD) 

264. Forensic Anthropology. (3h) Introduction to the conduct of forensic anthropology, includ- 
ing basic human identification, the nature of evidence, laboratory analyses, field methods, and 
modem applicaHons. 

301. Free Trade, Fair Trade: Independent Entrepreneurs in the Global Market. (3h) Field-based 
seminar compares the barriers to market participation experienced by independent entrepre- 
neurs cross-culturally. Free trade policies are contrasted with fair trade practices to determine 
why so many independent producers have trouble succeeding in a globalizing world. Also 
listed as ESE 201. (CD) 

305. Museum Anthropology. (4h) Examines the historical, social, and ideological forces shaping 
the development of museums, including the formation of anthropological collections and rep- 
resentation, and the intellectual and social challenges facing museums today through hands-on 
use of the Museum's collections. Lab — four hours. P — ANT 111 or 112 or 114, or POL 

307. Collections Management Practicum. (1.5h) The principles of collections management includ- 
ing artifact registration, cataloging, storage, and handling; conservation issues and practices; 
disaster planning and preparedness; and ethical issues are covered through lectures, readings, 
workshops, and hands-on use of the Museum's collections. 

31 3. Tradition, Continuity, and Struggle: Mexico and Central America. (3h) Acquaints students 
with the lives and struggles of indigenous and non-indigenous people of Mexico and neighbor- 
ing countries, with special focus on the Maya. Includes the study of contemporary and prehis- 
panic traditions, including Mayan cosmology, language, art and architecture, issues of contact 
during Spanish colonization, and current political, economic, health, and social issues affecting 
these areas today. (CD) 

31 5. Artifact Analysis and Laboratory Methods in Archaeology. (3h) Intioduction to methods for 
determining the composition, age, manufacture, and use of different prehistoric and historic 
artifact types. Techniques for reconstruction of past natural environments from geological or 
ecofact samples. Exploration of data display tools including computer-based illustration, GIS, 
and archaeological photography. P — ANT 111 or 112 or 114, or POL 

330. Seeing World Cultures. (3h) Focuses on selected cultures throughout the world to better 
understand these societies through the use of ethnographic literature and assesses the effec- 
tiveness of visual communication in conveying ideas about these cultures through the use of 
ethnographic videos and fihns. P — ANT 111 or 112 or 113 or 114, or POL 

332. Anthropology of Gender. (3h) Focuses on the difference between sex, a biological category, 
and gender, its cultural counterpart. An anthropological perspective is used to understand both 
the human life cycle and the status of contemporary women and men worldwide. In section 



73 



ANTHROPOLOGY 



one, topics include evolution and biological development, sexuality and reproduction, parent- 
ing, and life cycle changes. The second section takes students to diverse locations, including 
Africa, South Dakota, China, India, and the Amazon for a cross-cultural comparison examining 
roles, responsibilities, and expectations, and how these interact with related issues of class and 
race. (CD) 

333. Language and Gender. (3h) Uses an anthropological perspective to examine relationships 
between language structure, language use, persons, and social categories. Also listed as LIN 333. 

334. Peoples and Cultures of South Asia. (3h) Survey of the peoples and cultures of the Indian 
subcontinent in the countries of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and 
Sri Lanka. Reviews major topics of interest to anthropologists, including prehistory, history and 
politics, religion, social organization, caste, gender, development, and population. (CD) 

336. Myth, Ritual, and Symbolism. (3h) Explores how people envision and manipulate the super- 
natural in cross-cultural perspective. Emphasizes functional aspects of religious beliefs and 
practices. Also listed as REL 304. P— ANT 111 or 112 or 113 or 114, or POL (CD) 

337. Economic Anthropology. (3h) Examines the relationship between culture and the economy 
and its implications for applied anthropology. The variable nature and meaning of economic 
behavior is examiiied in societies ranging from non-industrial to post-industrial. Discusses the 
impact of economic development programs, foreign aid and investment, technology transfer, 
and a variety of other economic aid programs. P — ANT 111 or 112 or 113 or 114, or POL 

339. Culture and Nature. (3h) Exploration of humanity's "place" in the cosmos, focusing on 
different worldviews of nature and culture. Case studies from anthropology, archaeology, and 
environmental science examine conceptions of technology, resources, environment, and ov^mer- 
ship in the context of environmental change, "natural" disasters, and resource scarcity. 

340. Anthropological Theory. (3h) Study and evaluation of the major anthropological theories of 
humans and society. The relevance and significance of these theories to modem anthropology 
are discussed. P— ANT 112 and 113 and 114, or POL 

342. Development Wars: Applying Anthropology. (3h) Explores the application of anthropologi- 
cal concepts and methods in the understanding of contemporary problems stemming from 
cultural diversity, including competing social and economic development models and ideolo- 
gies of terror. Emphasis on conflict and change in developing areas but also considers the urban 
experience. P— ANT 111 or 114, or POL (CD) 

353/354. Field Research. (3h, 3h) Issues-based field program provides students with a critical 
understanding of the historical, social, political-economic, and environmental conditions that 
have shaped the lives of the people of the Greater Southwest, with special attention to the Na- 
tive American and Latino /a experience. The program moves from the Mexican border region 
through New Mexico and Arizona, focusing on border issues, archaeology and prehispanic his- 
tory, and contemporary Native American culture. Students camp, hike, and learn to use digital 
technology in the field. Specific sites may vary from year to year. P — POL 

355. Language and Culture. (3h) Covers theoretical and methodological approaches to the study 
of language and culture, including: semiotics, structuralism, ethnoscience, the ethnography of 
communication, and sociolinguistics. Topics include: linguistic relativity; grammar and world- 
view; lexicon and thought; language use and social inequality; language and gender; and other 
areas. (CD) 

ANTHROPOLOGY 74 



358. Native Peoples of North America. (3h) Ethnology and prehistory of the indigenous peoples 
and cultures of North America. P— ANT 111 or 112 or 113 or 114. (CD) 

361. Evolution of Human Behavior. (3h) The application of Darwinian principles to the study of 
human nature and culture. Considers the existence, origin, and manifestation of human behav- 
ioral universals and the theoretical and practical implications of individual variability. 

362. Medical Anthropology. (3h) Examines the impact of Western medical practices and theory 
on Western and non-Western cultures and anthropological contributions to the solving of world 
health problems. Service learning. P— ANT 111 or 112 or 113 or 114, or POL (CD) 

363. Primate Behavior and Biology. (3h) Examines the evolution and adaptations of the order 
Primates. Considers the different ways that ecology and evolution shape social behavior. 
Special emphasis on the lifeways of monkeys and apes. 

364. Primate Evolutionary Biology. (3h) Examines the anatomy, evolution, and paleobiology of 
members of the order Primates. Emphasis is placed on the fossil evidence for primate evolu- 
tion. Major topics include: primate origins, prosimian and anthropoid adaptations, patterns in 
primate evolution, and the place of humans within the order Primates. 

365. Evolutionary Medicine. (3h) An explicitly evolutionary approach to complex relationships 
between human evolutionary adaptations and health problems related to modern behavior and 
culture. P— ANT 111, 113, or 114, or POl. 

366. Human Evolution. (3h) The paleontological evidence for early human evolution, with an 
emphasis on the first five million years of bio-cultural evolution. P — ANT 113 or POl. 

368. Human Osteology. (4h) Survey and analysis of human skeletal anatomy, emphasizing 
archaeological and anthropological applications and practice. Lab — four hours. 

370. Old World Prehistory. (3h) Survey of Old World prehistory, with particular attention to geo- 
logical and climatological events affecting culture change. P — ANT 112 or POl. 

374. Prehistory of North America. (3h) The development of culture in North America, as outlined 
by archaeological research, with an emphasis on paleoecology and sociocultural processes. 
P— ANT 112 or POl. 

376. Archaeology of the Southeastern United States. (1.5h) Study of human adaptation in the 
Southeast from Pleistocene to the present, emphasizing the role of ecological factors in deter- 
mining the formal aspects of culture. P — ANT 111 or 112 or 113 or 114. 

377. Ancestors, Indians, Immigrants: A Southwest Cultural Tapestry. (3h) Exploration of factors 
that shaped the lives of people in the Southwest with attention to Native American and Hispan- 
ic experience. From kivas to casinos, coyotes to cartels, it links archaeological and prehispanic 
history to contemporary lifeways in the canyons, deserts, and cities of the U.S. /North Mexico. 
Also listed as HMN 268. (CD) 

378. Conservation Archaeology. (1.5h) Study of the laws, regulations, policies, programs, and 
political processes used to conserve prehistoric and historic cultural resources. 

380. Anthropological Statistics. (3h) Basic statistics, emphasizing application in anthropological 
research. A student who receives credit for this course may not also receive credit for BIO 380, 
BUS201,HES262,orSOC371. (QR) . ' 



75 



ANTHROPOLOGY 



381, 382. Field Program in Anthropological Archaeology. (3h, 3h) Integrated training in archaeo- 
logical field methods and analytical techniques for researching human prehistory. Students 
learn archaeological survey, mapping, excavation, recording techniques, and artifact and ecofact 
recovery and analysis. P— ANT 111 or 112 or 113 or 114, or POL (D) 

383, 384. Field Program in Cultural Anthropology. (3h, 3h) The comparative study of culture and 
training in ethnographic and cultural analysis carried out in the field. P — ANT 111 or 112 or 113 
or 114, or POL (D) 

385, 386. Special Problems Seminar. (3h, 3h) Intensive investigation of current scientific research 
within the discipline. Concentrates on problems of contemporary interest. 

387. Ethnographic Research Methods. (3h) Designed to familiarize students with ethnographic 
research methods and their application. Considers the epistemological, ethical, political, and 
psychological aspects of research. Laboratory experience and data analysis. P — ANT 111 or 114. 

390. Student-Faculty Seminar. (3h) A review of contemporary problems in the fields of archaeol- 
ogy, and biological and cultural anthropology. Senior standing recommended. P — ANT 112, 113 
and 114, or POL 

391, 392. Internship in Anthropology. (3h, 3h) Internship course designed to meet the needs and 
interests of selected students, to be carried out under the supervision of a departmental faculty 
member. P — POL 

398, 399. Individual Study. (Ih, 1.5h, 2h, or 3h) Reading or research course designed to meet the 
needs and interests of selected students, to be carried out under the supervision of a departmen- 
tal faculty member. P — POL 

Art (ART) 

Chair Page H. Laughlln 

Reynolds Professor in Film Studies Peter Brunette 

J. Smith Young Family Fellow and Professor of Art Page Laughlln 

Charlotte C. Weber Professor of Art David M. Lubin 

Harold W. Tribble Professor of Art Margaret S. Smith 

Professors David L Faber, Robert Knott, Harry B. Titus Jr. 

Associate Professors Bernadlne Barnes, David Finn, John R. PIckel 

Assistant Professors Roymieco A. Carter, Lynne Johnson 

Instructor Mix Hitchcock 

Lecturers Brian Allen (London), Maria A. Chlari (Venice), Beatrice Ottersbock (Vienna), 

Katie Scott (London), Yue-LIng Wong 

Adjunct Assistant Professors Bryan Ellis, Jennifer Gentry, Mary Elizabeth Howie 

Visiting Assistant Professor Leigh Ann Hallberg 

The department offers courses in the history of art, architecture, printmaking, photography, 
and film from the ancient through modem periods, and the practice of art in six areas: drawing, 
painting, printmaking, sculpture, photography, and digital art. Opportunities to supplement 
the regular academic program of the department include study abroad in Wake Forest residen- 
tial study centers, changing art exhibitions in the gallery of the Scales Fine Arts Center, a visit- 
ing artists program, and internships in local museums and arts organizations. 

ART 76 



The department offers two majors, art history and studio art, each requiring a minimum 
of thirty hours. Any student interested in majoring or minoring in art should contact the art 
department. 

For the art history major, twenty-four hours are to be in art history and six hours in studio art. 
The required art history courses include one course in Ancient, Classical or Medieval art; one 
course in Renaissance, Baroque, or eighteenth-century art; one course in modern painting, 
architecture, photography, or film; ART 394; one art history seminar; two studio art courses; and 
electives. Art history majors are encouraged to take ART 103 and a course in non-western art. 
An art history minor requires twelve hours in art history and three hours in studio art. 

For the studio art major, twenty-four hours are to be in studio art and six hours in art history. 
There are six areas of study in studio art: drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, photog- 
raphy, and digital art. The studio major requires a three course sequence and a two course 
sequence in two different areas of study. In addition, the major requires three to five studio elec- 
tives and two classes in art liistory. At least one class for the studio major must be in sculpture. 
The studio art majors must select their classes from at least four of the six studio areas. Studio 
art classes at the 200 level may be repeated once. A minor in studio art requires twelve hours in 
studio art and three hours in art history. 

A minor in either studio art or art history requires a minimum of fifteen hours. Students may 
major in one field and minor in another by earning a minimum of 39 hours in art, of which at 
least 24 hours must be in the major field and at least 12 hours in the minor field. 

Honors. Qualified students in both the studio and art history areas may ask to participate in the 
department's honors program. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Art," students 
must execute a written project or create a body of work; the results of their efforts must be 
presented and defended before a committee of department faculty. Interested students should 
consult any member of the department for additional information concerning the requirements 
for this program. 

Students with a special interest in multimedia development may wish to consider a program 
of study that combines digital art and computer science. Advisers in either the art or computer 
science departments can provide further information on coordinating an art major with a com- 
puter science minor, or vice versa. 

The department accepts only three courses from a non-Wake Forest program for credit 
toward the major. Of these three courses, only two may be in the same area of concentration. 
For instance, an art major may take up to two art history courses and one studio course or two 
studio art courses and one art history course at a non-Wake Forest program. All studio courses 
taken abroad are assigned ART 210. 

Students enrolled at Wake Forest may not take courses in studio art or art history at other 
institutions to satisfy divisional requirements. 

Art History 

103. History of Western Art. (3h) Introduction to the history of the visual arts, focusing on Europe 
and the United States. (D) 

104. Topics in World Art. (3h) Examination of the visual arts in selected world cultures, with 
discussions of techniques, styles, broader cultural contexts, and confrontations with varying 



77 



traditions. Topics may include one or more of the following: the arts of China, Japan, India, Pak- 
istan, Bangladesh, Africa, Islamic cultures, or the indigenous cultures of the Americas. (CD, D) 

105. The History of World Architecture. (3h) Examination of architectural monuments in selected 
world cultures with discussions of the plarming, siting, design, construction, patronage, histori- 
cal impact, and broader cultural context. (CD, D) 

231. American Visual Arts. (3h) American art and culture from the Colonial period to 1900 in 
terms of changing aesthetic standards, social, and historical developments. Includes fine arts, 
folk arts, material culture, and mass media. (D) 

232. African-American Art. (3h) African-American art from the eighteenth century to the present, 
with attention to the social and historical context of the works and the artist. (CD, D) 

233. American Architecture. (3h) Discussion-based course examining American architecture 
from 1650 to the present. (D) Alternates in fall semester with ART 288. 

241. Ancient Art. (3h) Survey of architecture, painting, and sculpture from ca. 3000 BCE through 
the late Roman period. (D) 

244. Greek Art. (3h) Survey of architecture, painting, and sculpture from ca. 800 BCE through 
the Hellenistic period. (D) 

245. Roman Art. (3h) Survey of Etruscan and Roman architecture, painting, and sculpture. (D) 

252. Romanesque Art. (3h) Art and architecture from the Carolingian Renaissance through the 
twelfth century. (D) 

253. The Gothic Cathedral. (3h) The character and evolution of Gothic cathedrals and the sculp- 
ture, stained glass, metalworks, and paintings designed for them. (D) 

254. Luxury Arts in the Middle Ages. (3h) Medieval illuminated manuscripts and precious objects 
made of gold, silver, ivory, enamel, and other luxury materials are the subjects of this course. (D) 

258. The History of Prints. (3h) Survey of the technical and stylistic developments in printmaking 
from the fifteenth century to the present. Special attention is given to the function of prints in 
society. Student research focuses on prints in the University Print Collection. (D) 

259. The History of Photography. (3h) Historical and critical survey of photography from its 
invention in 1826 to the present. Special attention to the medium's cultural and artistic recep- 
tion. (D) 

260. Classics of World Cinema. (3h) Selected masterpieces of world film 1930-1965 (two in-class 
screenings per week). Emphasis is on developing skills for viewing, discussing, and writing 
about motion pictures as visual and dramatic art. (D) 

261. Topics in Film History. (3h) Variable topics in film history, including genres, major directors, 
regional or national cinemas, and historical periods. Course may be repeated if topic is differ- 
ent. (D) 

266. Art in the Age of Giotto, Dante, and the Plague. (3h) Developments in Italian painting, sculp- 
ture, and architecture in the fourteenth century with special attention to the new naturalism of 
Giotto and the effects of the Great Plague of 1348 on the arts. (D) 



78 



267. Early Italian Renaissance Art. (3h) The development of art and architecture in Italy in the 
fifteenth century. Special attention is given to the works of Donatello, Botticelli, and Leonardo 
da Vinci. (D) 

268. High Renaissance and Mannerist Art. (3h) The development of art and architecture in the 
sixteenth century in Rome, Florence, Venice and other cities. Artists studied include Michelcin- 
gelo, Raphael, and Titian. (D) 

270. Northern Renaissance Art. (3h) Survey of painting, sculpture, and printmaking in Northern 
Europe from the mid-fourteenth century through the sixteenth century. (D) 

272. Baroque Art. (3h) Survey of major art, artists, and cultural issues in seventeenth-century 
Europe. (D) 

273. Rococo to Revolution: The Art of Eighteenth-Century Europe. (3h) Discussion-based study of 
painting, graphics, sculpture, and architecture in the historical and literary contexts of eigh- 
teenth-century Europe. (D) 

275. History of Landscape Architecture. (3h) Survey of garden and landscape design from the 
Roman period through the tv^entieth century. (D) 

281. Nineteenth-Century Art. (3h) Survey of European and American art from the French Revo- 
lution to 1900, emphasizing the major movements from Romanticism to Impressionism and 
Post-Impressionism. (D) 

282. Modern Art Since 1900. (3h) Survey of European and American painting in the twentieth 
and twenty-first centuries. (D) 

284. Contemporary American Art. (3h) Intensive study of American painting and sculpture from 
1950 to the present. (D) 

288. Modern Architecture. (3h) Survey of European and American architecture from 1900 to the 
present. Alternates in fall semester with ART 233. (D) 

297. Management in the Visual Arts. (3h) Provides to both art and business students the essential 
skills, pragmatic experiences, and a conceptual framework for understanding the role the visual 
arts play within the national and international economy. Also listed as BUS 282. P — ^Junior or 
senior standing and POL 

331 . American Foundations. (3h) Interdisciplinary study of American art, music, literature and 
social history with particular reference to the art collection at Reynolda House Museum of 
American Art. Lectures, discussions and field trips, including a tour of New York City muse- 
ums. Term project in American art. Also listed as HST 349, HON 393, 394, and MUS 307. 
Offered at Reynolda House in summer only. 

351 . Women and Art. (3h) Historical examination of the changing image of women in art and the 
role of women artists. 

394. Issues in Art History. (3h) Discussion-based course focusing on critical theory and methods 
employed by art historians working today as well as by some of the founding figures of the 
discipline. Intended for art history majors. P — Non-majors, POL 



79 



396. Art History Seminar. (3h) Focused readings, discussion, and research on a topic selected by 
members of the faculty. P — One course in art history or POT. 

a. Ancient Art h. Modern Architecture 

b. Medieval Art i. American Architecture 

c. Renaissance Art j. Art and Popular Culture 

d. Baroque Art k. Film 

e. Modern Art I. Architecture and Urbanism 

f. Contemporary Art m. Museums 

g. American Art n. Special Topics 

Studio Art 

All studio art courses 200 and above and llOA-G may he repeated. Prerequisites may be waived with 
permission of instructor. 

110. Topics in Studio Art. (3h) Used to designate studio art courses in the Wake Forest summer 
school. (D) Studio art courses are determined by individual instructors in the following areas: 

a. Drawing e. Photography 

b. Painting f. Digital Art 

c. Printmaking g. Special Topics 

d. Sculpture 

1 1 1. Introduction to Studio Art Fundamentals. (3h) Students are introduced to basic elements of 
two-dimensional and three-dimensional fine art through hands-on experimentation and critical 
thinking. Six class hours per week. (D) 

112. Introduction to Painting. (3h) Introduction to the fvmdamentals of the contemporary prac- 
tice of oil painting. No prior painting experience required, although prior studio art experience 
is recommended. (D) 

114. Digital Art I. (3h) Introduction to the fundamentals of art-making using computer software. 
Emphasis is on the acquisition of basic skills and concepts focusing on two-dimensional image 
manipulation and basic Web page design as an art form. A working knowledge of the Windows 
operating system required. (D) 

115. Introduction to Sculpture. (3h) Introduction to basic sculptural styles and multimedia, with 
emphasis on contemporary concepts. Prior studio experience is recommended. (D) 

1 1 7. Introduction to Printmaking. (3h) Introduction to one or more of the following areas of 
printmaking: lithography, intaglio, and silkscreen. (D) 

118. Introduction to Drawing. (3h) Drawing fundamentals emphasizing composition, value, line, 
and form. (D) 

119. Introduction to Photography. (3h) introduction to black and white photography with a brief 
introduction to digital imaging. Technical information serves the goal of understanding contem- 
porary aesthetic and critical issues. Students must provide a manual 35 mm SLR camera. (D) 

120. Re/Imaging Berlin. (3h) Students research the history, location and the creation of specific 
historical documents, such as the photographs from the airlift of 1948 and the film of President 
Kennedy's (now cliche) "Ich bin ein Berliner" speech. Students travel to these sites on bicycle 
and re-photograph the area. Each student creates a body of images, which will be printed on a 

ART 80 



desktop Inkjet printer for regular critiques. A short "German Language and Culture Survival" 
course is included. Offered in summer only in Berlin. (CD) 

210. Topics in Studio Art. (3h) Used to designate studio art courses taken at other institutions. 
Studio art courses are determined by individual instructors in the following areas: 

a. Drawing e. Photography 

b. Painting f. Digital Art 

c. Printmaking g. Special Topics 

d. Sculpture 

21 1. Intermediate Drawing. (3h) Emphasis on idea development in realistic and abstract styles in 
drawing and water color media. May be repeated. P — ART 111 or 118 or 218 or POI. 

212. Painting II. (3h) Continuation of ART 112 with concentrated emphasis on conceptual devel- 
opment and technical exploration. Offered in the fall semester only. P — ART 112. 

213. Painting III. (3h) Individualized course of study with emphasis on refining the skills and 
concepts developed in Painting II. May be repeated. Offered in fall semester only. P — ART 212. 

214. Digital Art II. (3h) Continuation of critical and technical development of computer gener- 
ated art-making with a focus on strengthening aesthetic and technical skills using two-dimen- 
sional as well as time-based media such as video and sound. P — ART 114. 

215. Public Art. (3h) Covers art that is sited in the public realm. Exercises with various sites, 
materials, and audiences culminate in a public project. Offered in fall semester, even years. 
P— ART 115 or POI. 

216. Sculpture Fabrication. (3h) Fabrication of small scale sculpture using wood, fabric, and 
metal. Projects stiess craftsmanship and imagination. Offered in spring semester, odd years. 
P— ART 115 or POI. 

217. Intermediate Printmaking. (3h) Continuation of ART 117, with emphasis on idea develop- 
ment. May be repeated. P — ART 117. 

218. Figure Drawing. (3h) Introduction to drawing the nude model using a variety of media and 
approaches. May be repeated once. P — Any 100 level course or POI. 

219. Darkroom Photography. (3h) Further exploration of traditional black and white photog- 
raphy, camera techniques, aesthetic, and critical issues to increase the understanding of the 
contemporary photographic image. Not offered every semester. P — ART 119. 

221. Advanced Drawing. (3h) Individual study with faculty guidance. May be repeated. 
P— ART 211. 

222. Advanced Painting. (3h) Individual study with faculty guidance focusing on developing 
a body of work for exhibition. Covers various aspects of professional practice including artist 
statements and proposals, and portfolio development. May be repeated. Offered in spring semes- 
ter only. P— ART 212. 

224. Digital Art III. (3h) Continuation of digital art-making using selected digital media to create 
independent projects. Forms may include: interactive multimedia using both CD-ROM and the 
Internet, advanced digital image creation, animation, sound, and video. Emphasis is on devel- 
opment of personal aesthetics, technical excellence, and understanding of the contemporary 
issues of digital art-making. P — ART 214. 

81 ^^^ 



225. Bodies and Objects. (3h) Explores the social and psychological ramifications of making 
objects based on the body through casting and other techniques. Offered in fall semester, odd years. 
P— ART 115 or POL 

226. Sculpture Installation. (3h) Exercises to develop an understanding of material, process, and 
audience as they relate to contemporary sculpture. Major projects for the course are an installa- 
tion and a design project. Offered in spring semester, even years. P — ART 115 or POL 

227. Advanced Printmaking. (3h) Individual study with faculty guidance. May be repeated. 
P— ART 217. 

229. Digital Photography. (3h) Further exploration of digital photography camera techniques, 
digital printing, aesthetic, and critical issues to increase the understanding of the contemporary 
photographic image. Not offered every semester. P — ART 119 or POL 

239. Videography. (3h) Exploration of videography, DV camera techniques, digital editing, non- 
camera animation, aesthetic, and critical issues to increase the understanding of contemporary 
video art. Not offered every semester. P — ART 119 or POL 

290S. Printmaking Workshop. (3h) Workshop exploring relief, intaglio, lithography, and mono- 
type techniques. Open to students at any skill level. Offered in the summer. 

295. Studio Seminar. (1.5h, 3h) Offered by members of the faculty or visiting faculty on topics of 
their choice and related studio activities. P — POL 



Other Art Courses 

291. Individual Study. (1.5h, 3h) Independent study with faculty guidance. P — POL 

293. Practicum. (3h) Internships in local cultural organizations, to be arranged and approved in 
advance by the art department. Pass/Fail. P — POL 

299. International Studies in Art. (3h) Offered by art department faculty in locations outside of 
the United States, on specific topics in art history or studio art. Offered in the summer. (D) 

2320. English Art, Hogarth to the Present. (3h) Survey of English painting, sculpture, and archi- 
tecture in the Georgian, Victorian, and modern periods. Slide lectures, student reports, museum 
visits, and lectures. Taught by a special lecturer. Offered in London. (D) 

2693. Venetian Renaissance Art. (3h) Survey of the art of the Venetian Renaissance, with slide 
lectures and museum visits. Offered in Venice. (D) 

2712. Studies in French Art. (3h) Lectures and field trips in French painting, sculpture, and archi- 
tecture, concentrating on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Offered in Dijon. (D) 

2767. Austrian Art and Architecture. (3h) Study of the development of Austrian art and architec- 
ture and its relationship to European periods and styles. Includes visits to sites and museums. 

Offered in Vienna. (D) 



82 



Biology (BIO) 

Chair Kathleen A. Kron 

Charles M. Allen Professor of Biology Gerald W. Esch 

Thurman D. Kitchin Professor of Biology Ronald V. Dimock Jr. 

1 Reynolds Professor Susan Fahrbach 

William L Poteat Professor of Biology Raymond E. Kuhn 

Charles H. Babcock Chair of Botany William K. Smith 

Professors David J. Anderson, Carole L Browne, Robert A. Browne, William E. Conner, James F. Curran, 

Herman E. Eure, Kathleen A. Kron, Hugo C. Lane, Gloria K. Muday, Wayne L Silver, Peter D. Weigl 

Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Fellow and Associate Professor Miles R. Silman 

Associate Professors Miriam A. Ashley-Ross, Brian W.Tague, Clifford W. Zeyl 

Assistant Professor Erik C. Johnson 

Senior Lecturer A. Daniel Johnson 

Lecturer Pat C.W. Lord 

Research Professors J. Whitfield Gibbons, Terry C. Hazen 

Research Associate Professor A. Dennis Lemly 

Adjunct Assistant Professor and Director of Microscopy Anita K. McCauley 

Adjunct Assistant Professors Victor Apanius, Hanya Chrispeels 

Adjunct Instructor R. Gant Hewett 



The department offers programs leading to a bachelor of arts and a bachelor of science degree 
in biology. Sophomore students electing to major in biology should consult with a major ad- 
viser to determine which degree program would be most appropriate for their career objectives. 
The requirements for completion of each degree program are those in effect at the time of the 
declaration of the major, since the curriculum and the departmental requirements may change 
slightly during the student's period of residence. 

The requirements for both the BA and BS degree programs are a minimum of thirty-four hours in 
biology. A maximum of four hours of research in biology may be applied toward the major, but 
an additional four hours (BIO 393 and /or 394) may be taken and applied toward graduation as 
elective hours. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 on biology courses taken at Wake Forest 
is required for graduation with a major in biology. Prospective majors are strongly urged to 
select either BIO 112 or 113 as their first course in biology. BIO 213 and 214 are more advanced 
courses and should be taken after BIO 112 and 113. Most prospective majors also should take 
CHM 111 and 122 in their first year. 

Students pursuing the bachelor of arts (BA) degree are required to take BIO 112, 113, 213, 
and 214 and at least tw^o 300 level four-hour biology courses. Co-requirements for the BA 
degree include the following laboratory courses: CHM 111 and 122 and one additional 
course in mathematics or physical science. 

Students pursuing the bachelor of science (BS) degree are required to take BIO 112, 113, 213, 
214, a research experience (such as BIO 391 or an equivalent program approved by the ma- 
jor adviser) and at least two 300 level four-hour biology courses. Co-requirements for the 
BS degree include the following laboratory courses: CHM 111, 120 (or 223) and 122, PHY 
113, 114 and one additional course in mathematics or physical sciences at the 200 level or 
above. 



83 



A minor in biology requires sixteen hours. Courses taken pass/fail cannot count toward a minor. 
A minimum overall grade point average of 2.0 must be earned on all Wake Forest biology 
courses taken to complete a minor. The requirements for the minor are those that are in effect 
at the time of the declaration of the minor, since the curriculum and the departmental require- 
ments may change slightly during the student's period of residence. 

Honors. Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to 
the honors program in biology. To be graduated with the distinction "Honors in Biology," a 
graduating student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in all courses and a 3.3 
in biology courses. In addition, the student must submit an honors paper describing his or her 
independent research project, written in the form of a scientific paper, which must be submit- 
ted to and approved by an advisory committee. Specific details regarding the honors program, 
including selecting an adviser and an advisory committee, deadlines, and writing of the honors 
thesis, may be obtained from the chair of the departmental Undergraduate Studies Committee. 

Special Note. Students enrolled at Wake Forest may not take courses in biology at other institu- 
tions to satisfy divisional requirements. 

1 01 . Biology and the Human Condition. (4h) Introductory course that focuses on the relevance 
to society of recent breakthroughs in biology. Basic principles are covered. Emphasizes recent 
advances in biology placed in the context of their ethical, social, political, and economic impli- 
cations. Intended for students with little or no previous experience in biology. Does not count 
toward the major or minor in biology. Lab — three hours. (D) 

111. Biological Principles. (4h) Study of the general principles of living systems with focus on the 
cellular, organismal, and populational levels of biological organization, emphasizing the role of 
heredity and evolution in these systems. Intended for students with little or no previous experi- 
ence in biology. Does not count toward the major or minor in biology. Lab — three hours. (D) 

112. Comparative Physiology. (4h) Intioduction to the form and function of organisms, with 
emphasis on physical principles, stiuctural organization, and critical function of plants and 
animals. Intended as a beginning course in biology for prospective majors and for any students 
with adequate high school preparation in biology. Lab — three hours. (D) 

1 1 3. Evolutionary and Ecological Biology. (4h) Intioduction to the principles of genetics, ecology, 
and evolution as they apply to organisms, populations, and communities, with emphasis on 
evolutionary processes within an ecological context. Intended as a beginning course in biology 
for prospective majors and for any students with adequate high school preparation in biology. 
Lab— three hours. (D, QR) 

213. Genetics and Molecular Biology. (4h) introduction to the principles and processes of hered- 
ity, information flow, and gene function. Topics covered include Mendelian genetics, molecular 
genetics, and the origin of genetic variation. Lab — three hours. 

214. Cellular Biology. (4h) Introduction to the principles and processes of cellular biology and 
their impact on organismal function. Topics include molecular organization of cellular struc- 
tures, regulations of cellular functions, bioenergetics, and metabolism. Intioduces cancer, im- 
munology, and developmental biology. Lab — three hours. P — BIO 112 and CHM 111, or POL 

216. Biodiversity. (4h) Introductory course that traces the history of life on earth and looks at 
its diversification in an evolutionary and ecological context. Lectures cover the mechanisms of 



84 



biological diversification and surveys life on earth. Labs introduce students to the broad diver- 
sity of life through exercises with living organisms. Lab — three hours. (D) 

301 -306. Topics in Biology. (l-4h) Seminar and/or lecture courses in selected topics, some in- 
volving laboratory instruction. May be repeated if the course title differs. 

307. Biophysics. (3h) hitroduction to the structure, dynamic behavior, and function of DNA and 
proteins, and a survey of membrane biophysics. The physical principles of structure determina- 
tion by X-ray, NMR, and optical methods are emphasized. Also listed as PHY 307. P — BIO 112 
or 214, PHY 113, 114, or POL 

314. Evolution. (3h) Analysis of the theories, evidences, and mechanisms of evolution. P — BIO 
112 and 113. 

315. Population Genetics. (4h) Study of the amount and distribution of genetic variation in 
populations of organisms, and of how processes such as mutation, recombination, and selection 
affect genetic variation. Lectures present both an introduction to theoretical studies, and discus- 
sion of molecular and phenotypic variation in natural populations. Labs make use of computer 
modeling and simulation, and experiments using populations of fruitflies and other model 
organisms as appropriate. P — BIO 113 and 213. (QR) 

317. Plant Physiology and Development. (3h) Lecture course examines the growth, develop- 
ment, and physiological processes of plants. Control of these processes is examined on genetic, 
biochemical, and whole plant levels. P — BIO 112, 213, and 214. 

318. Plant Physiology and Development. (4h) Lecture and laboratory course examines the 
growth, development, and physiological processes of plants. Control of these processes is ex- 
amined on genetic, biochemical, and whole plant levels. Labs consist of structured experiments 
and an independently designed research project. Lab — three hours. P — BIO 112, 213, and 214. 

320. Comparative Anatomy. (4h) Study of the vertebrate body from an evolutionary, functional, 
and developmental perspective. Labs emphasize structure and function, primarily through the 
dissection of representative vertebrates. Lab — three hours. P — BIO 112 and 113. 

321. Parasitology. (4h) Survey of protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasites from the stand- 
point of morphology, taxonomy, life histories, and host/parasite relationships. Lab — three 
hours. P— BIO 112 and 113. 

322. Biomechanics. (4h) Analysis of the relationship between organismal form and function us- 
ing principles from physics and engineering. Solid and fluid mechanics are employed to study 
design in living systems. Lab — three hours. P — BIO 112. 

323. Animal Behavior. (4h) Survey of laboratory and field research on animal behavior. Lab — 
three hours. P— BIO 112 and 113. 

324. Hormones and Behavior. (3h) Introduction to the hormonal regulation of behavior in a 
broad range of animals, including humans and invertebrates. Topics include reproductive 
behavior, parental behavior, social behavior, sex differences, aggressive behavior, stress, mood, 
and the regulation of molting in insects. P — BIO 112. 

325. Chronobiology. (3h) Introduction to the field of biological rhythms, covering different types 
of rhythms, their evolution, and the mechanisms by which such rhythms are generated and 
regulated at the molecular, cellular, and system levels. P — BIO 213, 214, or POL 



85 



326. Microbiology. (4h) Structure, Rinction, and taxonomy of microorganisms with emphasis on 
bacteria. Topics include microbial ecology, industrial microbiology, and medical microbiology. 
Lab emphasizes microbial diversity through characterizations of isolates from nature. P — BIO 
213 and 214; CHM 122. 

331. Invertebrates. (4h) Systematic study of invertebrates, with emphasis on functional mor- 
phology, behavior, ecology, and phylogeny. Lab — three hours. P — BIO 112 and 113. 

333. Vertebrates. (4h) Systematic study of vertebrates, with emphasis on evolution, physiology, 
behavior, and ecology. Lab devoted to systematic, field, and experimental studies. Lab — three 
hours. P— BIO 112 and 113. 

335. Insect Biology. (4h) Study of the diversity, structure, development, physiology, behavior, 
and ecology of insects. Lab — three hours. P — BIO 112 and 113. 

335S. Insect Biology. (4h) A study of the diversity, structure, development, physiology, behavior, 
and ecology of one of the most diverse taxa on earth. Course location and field trip destinations 
to be announced each summer. Five-week course taught during the summer. P — POL 

337. Plants and People. (4h) Explores various associations between plants and people, their in- 
terrelationships, medical as well as ethical, and the impact of these interrelationships on various 
contemporary societies. Lab — three hours. 

338. Plant Systematics. (4h) Study of the diversity and evolution of flowering plants. Lectures 
emphasize the comparative study of selected plant families, their relationships and the use of 
new information and techniques to enhance our understanding of plant evolution. Labs empha- 
size more practical aspects of plant systematics such as the use of identification keys, recogni- 
tion of common local plants, molecular techniques, and basic phylogenetic analysis. 

339. Principles of Biosystematics. (4h) Exploration of the current theoretical and practical ap- 
proaches to the study of macroevolution in plants and animals. Topics include theory and 
methods of constructing evolutionary trees, sources of data, and cladistic biogeography. 
Lab — three hours. 

340. Ecology. (4h) Interrelationships among living systems and their environments; structure 
and dynamics of major ecosystem types; contemporary problems in ecology. Lab — three hours. 
P— BIO 112 and 113. (QR) 

341. Marine Biology. (4h) Introduction to the physical, chemical, and biological parameters af- 
fecting the distribution of marine organisms. Lab — three hours. P — BIO 112 and 113. 

342. Aquatic Ecology. (4h) Designed to cover the general principles and concepts of limnology 
and aquatic biology as they apply to lentic and lotic habitats. A major portion of the field study 
is centered at the Charles M. Allen Biological Station. Lab — three hours. P — BIO 113. 

343. Tropical Ecology. (3h) Exploration of the ecology, biodiversity, history, and future of tropical 
ecosystems. Lectures emphasize ecological principles and rely heavily on the primary literature. 
An upper-level ecology course is recommended. P — BIO 112 and 113. 

344S. Tropical Marine Ecology. (4h) Intensive field-oriented course focusing on tropical marine 
ecosystems and their biological communities. Emphasis is on biodiversity, the ecology of domi- 
nant taxa, the interactions between physical and biological processes, and the structure and 
function of representative communities. Includes 2.5 weeks at the Hofstra University Marine 



BIOLOGY g^ 



Laboratory, Jamaica. Offered in the summer only. P — Minimum of one year of college biology 
including BIO 113 and POI. 

345. Neurobiology. (3h) Introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system includ- 
ing the neural basis of behavior. Anatomical, physiological, and neurochemical approaches are 
integrated in the study of the peripheral and central nervous systems. P — BIO 112 and 214. 

346. Neurobiology. (4h) Introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system includ- 
ing the neural basis of behavior. Anatomical, physiological, and neurochemical approaches are 
integrated in the study of the peripheral and central nervous systems. Labs emphasize electro- 
physiological techniques with experiments from the cellular to the behavioral level. Lab — three 
hours. P— BIO 112 and 214. 

347. Physiological Plant Ecology. (3h) Designed to provide a fundamental understanding of how 
plants have adapted to the stresses of their habitats, particularly in harsh or extreme environ- 
ments such as deserts, the alpine, the arctic tundra, and tropical rain forests. P — BIO 112 

and 113. 

348. Physiological Plant Ecology. (4h) Designed to provide a fundamental understanding of how 
plants have adapted to the stresses of their habitats, particularly in harsh or extreme environ- 
ments such as deserts, the alpine, the arctic ttmdra, and tropical rainforests. Labs introduce 
students to a broad array of field instrumentation. P — BIO 112 and 113. (QR) 

349S. Tropical Biodiversity. (4h) Intensive field course in tropical biodiversity. Students travel to 
major tropical biomes, including deserts, glaciated peaks, and rain forests. Lectures emphasize 
the basic ecological principles important in each ecosystem; laboratories consist of student- 
designed field projects. Course location varies yearly. Offered in the summer only. P — BIO 112 and 
113 and POI. 

350. Conservation Biology. (3h) Lectures, readings, and discussions examining biological 
resources, their limitations and methods for sustainability. Genetic, aquatic, terrestrial, and 
ecosystem resources are examined. P — BIO 113. 

351. Vertebrate Physiology. (4h) Lecture and laboratory course examining regulatory principles, 
integration in the nervous system and the physiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and 
renal systems of vertebrates. P — BIO 112 and 214. 

352. Developmental Neuroscience. (4h) Focuses on the development of neural structures and 
the plasticity of the mature nervous system. Attention is given to experimental model systems, 
particularly Drosophila melanogaster. The laboratory features molecular, immunocytochemical, 
and cell culture techniques for the study of neurons. P — BIO 213 and 214. 

354. Vertebrate Endocrinology. (3h) Lecture course that considers the evolution of the endo- 
crine glands and hormones and the physiology of the main hormonal pathways of vertebrates. 
P— BIO 112 and 214. 

355. Avian Biology. (4h) Lecture and laboratory course emphasizing ecological and evolutionary 
influences on the physiology, behavior, and population biology of birds. Includes taxonomy of 
the world's major bird groups. Lab — three hours. P — BIO 112 and 113. 

359. Genomics. (3h) Introduction to the acquisition, analysis, and utility of DNA sequence infor- 
mation. Topics include structural, comparative, and functional genomics, genetic mapping, 
bioinformatics, and proteomics. P — BIO 213. 



87 



360. Development. (4h) Description of the major events and processes of animal development, 
with an analysis of the causal factors underlying them. Attention is given to the embryonic 
development of vertebrates, but consideration is also given to other types of development and 
other organisms. Topics include fertilization, early development, growth and cell division, cell 
differentiation, the role of genes in development, cell interaction, morphogenesis, regeneration, 
birth defects, and cancer. Lab — three hours. P — BIO 112 and 214. 

361. Microbial Pathogenesis. (3h) Explores the molecular mechanisms by which microorganisms 
attack hosts, how hosts defend against pathogens, and how these interactions cause disease. 
P— BIO 112, 214, and POL 

362. Immunology. (3h) Study of the components and protective mechanisms of the immune 
system. P— BIO 112 and 214. 

363. Sensory Biology. (3h) Lecture course with emphasis on sensory physiology and other aspects 
of sensory systems, e.g. molecular biology and anatomy. Credit not allowed for BIO 363, 363S, 
and 364. P— BIO 112 and 214. 

363S. Sensory Biology. (3h) Lecture course with emphasis on sensory physiology and other 
aspects of sensory systems, e.g. molecular biology and anatomy. Credit not allowed for BIO 363, 
363S, and 364. Offered in the summer only. Taught in Ljubljana, Slovenia. P — BIO 112 and 214 
and POL 

364. Sensory Biology. (4h) Lecture and laboratory course with emphasis on sensory physiology 
and other aspects of sensory systems, e.g. molecular biology and anatomy. Credit not allowed 
for BIO 363, 363S, and 364. P— BIO 112 and 214. 

365. Biology of the Cell. (4h) Lecture and laboratory course on classic experiments and recent 
advances in cell biology. Lectures emphasize analysis and interpretation of experimental data in 
the primary literature, focusing on topics such as the targeting of macromolecules, cell-cell com- 
munication, and the control of cell division. The text for this course consists of papers that have 
led to the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine and more current work using biological 
tools. The lab introduces basic techniques in cell biology and leads to an independent project. 
Lab— three hours. P— BIO 112, 213, and 214. 

365S. Biology of the Cell. (3h) Lecture course with emphasis on cellular biology and reading of 
the primary literature. Offered in the summer only. Taught in Ljubljana, Slovenia. P — BIO 213, 214 
and POL 

367. Virology. (3h) Designed to introduce students to viruses, viral/host interactions, pathogeni- 
city, methods of control and their use in molecular biology, including gene therapy. P — BIO 112, 
213, and 214. 

368. The Cell Biological Basis of Disease. (3h) Examines some of the defects in basic cellular mech- 
anisms that are responsible for many diseases. P — BIO 112 and 214. 

369. The Cell Biological Basis of Disease. (4h) Examines some of the defects in basic cellular 
mechanisms that are responsible for many diseases. The labs use advanced microscopic and 
histological techniques to investigate basic properties of cells. P — BIO 112 and 214. 

370. Biochemistry: Macromolecules and Metabolism. (3h) Lecture course introducing the prin- 
ciples of biochemistry with an emphasis on the experimental approaches that elucidated these 
principles. Topics include structure, function, and biosynthesis of biological molecules, analysis 



of enzyme function and activity, bioenergetics, and regulation of metabolic pathways. Also 
listed as CHM 370. P— BIO 214 and either CHM 223 or 230, or POI. 

370L. Biochemistry: Macromolecules and Metabolism. (Ih) Laboratory course introducing the 
principles of biochemistry with an emphasis on the experimental approaches that elucidated 
these principles. Topics include structure, function, and biosynthesis of biological molecules, 
analysis of enzyme function and activity, bioenergetics, and regulation of metabolic pathways. 
Labs emphasize approaches for isolation and analysis of proteins and enzymes. Also listed as 
CHM 370L. P— BIO 214 and either CHM 223 or 230, or POI. 

372. Molecular Biology. (4h) Analysis of the molecular mechanisms by which stored genetic 
information directs cellular development. Emphasis is on storage and transmission of genetic 
information, regulation of gene expression, and the role of these processes in development. 
Labs focus on modem techniques of recombinant DNA analysis. Lab — three hours. P — BIO 112, 
213, and 214. 

376. The Biology of Fishes. (4h) Comparative study of structure /function, classification, ecology 
and phylogeny of fish. Lab — three hours. P — BIO 112 and 113. 

377. Community Ecology. (4h) Advanced ecology course covering mechanisms that determine 
the dynamics and distribution of plant and animal assemblages: life-history, competition, pre- 
dation, geology, climate, soils, and history. Lectures focus on ecological principles and theory. 
Labs include local field trips and discussion of the primary literature. Several weekend field 
trips. Lab— three hours. P— BIO 112, 113, and 214. (QR) 

378. Biogeography. (3h) Study of geographical, historical and ecological influences on the distri- 
bution, movements and diversity of organisms. Seminar relies on extensive reading, film, and 
map work as a basis of class discussions. P — BIO 112, 113. 

380. Biostatistics. (3h) Introduction to statistical methods used by biologists, including descrip- 
tive statistics, hypothesis-testing, analysis of variance, and regression and correlation. A student 
who receives credit for this course may not also receive credit for ANT 380, BUS 201, HES 262, 
orSOC371.(QR) 

381. Biostatistics Laboratory. (Ih) Application of computer-based statistical software. May not be 
used to satisfy one of the three 300-level four-hour courses required for the major if paired with 
BIO 380. (QR if paired with 380) 

385. Oceanography. (3h) Intioduction to geological, chemical, physical, and biological oceanog- 
raphy taught at the Sea Education Association program at Woods Hole, MA. P — Admission to 
the Sea Education Association program and approval of departmental chair and /or his or her 
designate. 

386. Practical Oceanography. (4h) A two-part lecture /laboratory course offered at sea in which 
students observe and apply in the field the concepts and sampling techniques intioduced in the 
shore component. Part of the Sea Education Association program taught at Woods Hole, MA. 

P — Admission to the Sea Education Association program and approval of departmental chair 
and /or his or her designate. 



89 



BIOLOGY 



391, 392. Research in Biology. (2h, 2h) Independent library and laboratory investigation carried 
out under the supervision of a member of the staff. P — POL Pass/Fail or for grade at discretion 
of the instructor.* 

393, 394. Research in Biology. (2h, 2h) Designed for students who wish to continue research proj- 
ects beyond BIO 391 and 392. Not to be counted toward major.* P — POL Pass/Fail option. 

396. Biomedical Ethics. (3h) Lectures and seminars examining contemporary issues in biomedi- 
cal ethics including the proper role of biomedical research and current controversies in health 
care and medical practice. P — BIO 112 and 214. 



Chemistry (CHMy 

Chair Christa L. Colyer . 

John B. White Professor of Chemistry Willie L Hinze 

Thurman D. Kitchin Professor of Chemistry Dilip K. Kondepudi 

William L. Poteat Professor of Chemistry Mark E. Welker 

Professors Bradley T. Jones, S. Bruce King, Abdessadek Lachgar, 

Ronald E. Noftle, Robert L Swofford 

Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Fellow and Associate Professor Christa L. Colyer 

Associate Professors Ulrich Bierbach, Paul B. Jones 

Assistant Professors Rebecca W. Alexander, Bernard A. Brown II, Karen L. Buchmueller, 

Akbar Salam, Suzanne L Tobey 

Senior Lecturer Angela Glisan King 

Visiting Assistant Professor Latifa Chahoua 

Visiting Associate Professor Catherine O. Welder 

Visiting Professor Albert Rives 

The department offers programs leading to the BA and BS degrees in chemistry. The BS degrees 
are certified by the American Chemical Society. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in the 
first two years of chemistry is required of students who elect to major in the department. Admis- 
sion to any class is contingent upon satisfactory grades in prerequisite courses, and registration 
for advanced courses must be approved by the department. Candidates for either the BA or 
BS degree with a major in chemistry must have a minimum grade point average of 2.0 in their 
chemistry courses numbered 200 or above. Unless otherwise stated, all chemistry courses are 
open to chemistry majors on a letter-grade basis only (even those courses not required for the 
major). Majors are required to complete on a letter-grade basis the required physics, biology, 
and mathematics courses. 

The department will accept transfer courses completed by incoming transfer students 
provided that those courses were taken only at four-year colleges and universities that offer a 
major in chemistry. These courses must be equivalent in content and level to courses offered 
at Wake Forest (as judged by a departmental curriculum committee). Courses taken in sum- 
mer school elsewhere, or in Wake Forest University study abroad programs, must meet these 
same criteria and receive pre-approval. Advanced courses, 300-level and above, are typically 



* The same numbered course cannot be repeated. Subsequent courses should be take in 
consecutive order. 



CHEMISTRY 90 



not transferable. Students enrolled at Wake Forest may not take courses in chemistry at other 
institutions to satisfy divisional requirements. 

The bachelor of science degree in chemistry requires 37.5 hours in chemistry and must include 
the following courses (and corequisite labs): 111, 122, 223, 230, 260, 334, 341, 344, 361, 381, 382, 
383, 391 (or 392); one of the following courses: 370, 372 or 356/357; MTH 111 and 112 and either 
113 or 301; and PHY HI or 113, and 114. The BS program is designed for those students who 
plan a career in chemistry at the bachelor or advanced degree level. 

The bachelor of science degree in chemistry with concentration in biochemistry requires 37.5 
hours in chemistry and must include the following courses (and corequisite labs): 111, 122, 223, 
230, 260, 334, 341, 361, 370, 372, 381, 382, 383, 391 (or 392); BIO 112, 213, 214; MTH 111, 112; PHY 
111 or 113, and 114, and one additional 300-level elective in either biology or chemistry. 

The bachelor of arts degree in chemistry requires 28 hours in chemistry and includes the follow- 
ing courses (and corequisite labs): 111, 122, 230, 260, 341; three of the following courses (and 
corequisite labs): 223, 334, 342 (or 344), 361, 370; one of the following courses: 381, 382, 383, 391 
or 392; MTH 111, 112; and PHY 111 or 113 and 114. The BA degree program is designed for those 
students who do not plan to do graduate work in the physical sciences but desire a stronger 
background in chemistry than is provided in the chemistry minor program. 

The bachelor of arts degree in chemistry with concentration in biochemistry and biophysics 

requires 32.5 to 33.5 hours in chemistry and must include the following courses (and corequisite 
labs): 111, 122, 223, 230, 260, 341, 370, 391 or 392 (may substitute PHY 381 or 382 or BIO 391, 392, 
393, or 394); two electives from 334, 342, 361, 372; two electives from BIO 112, 213, 214; MTH 
111, 112; PHY 111 or 113, 114, 215; and one elective from PHY 307/325, 320/323. 

A minor in chemistry requires nineteen hours in chemistry and must include at least one of the 
following: 334, 341, 356/357, 361, or 370. The department will not accept courses taken pass/fail 
to count toward the minor. 

Honors. Qualified majors are considered for honors in chemistry. To be graduated with the 
designation "Honors in Chemistry," a student must have a minimum grade point average in 
chemistry courses of 3.3 and a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0. In addition, the 
honors candidate must satisfactorily complete an approved research project, prepare a paper 
describing the project, and present results at a seminar for departmental approval. For addi- 
tional information, members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

The Health Professions Program at Wake Forest recommends that students take the following 
chemistry courses before the end of the third year: 111, 122, 223, 230, 260. Students interested in 
this track should see the Health Professions Program adviser for more information. 

For the BS major, the following schedule of chemistry and related courses is typical: 

First Year: CHM 111, mi, 122, 122L; MTH 111,112 

Sophomore: CHM 223, 223L, 230, 260; MTH 1 1 3 (or 301 ); PHY 1 1 1 or 1 1 3, 1 1 4 

Junior: CHM 341 , 341 L, 344, 342L, 381 , 382, 383, 391 (or 392); MTH 1 1 3 (or 301) 

Senior: CHM 334, 334L, 361 , 361 L, 381 , 382, 300-level elective 



91 



CHEMISTRY 



For the BS major with concentration in biochemistry, the following schedule of chemistry and 
related courses is typical: 

FirstYear: BIO 112;CHM 111, 111L, 122, 122L;MTH 111, 112 

Sophomore: BIO 213, 214; CHM 223, 223L, 230, 260; PHY 1 1 1 or 1 13, 1 14 

Junior: CHM 341, 341 L, 370,3701,372,391 (or 392) 

Senior: CHM 334, 334L, 361 , 361 L, 381 , 382, 383, 300-level elective in biology or chemistry 



For the BA major, the following schedule of chemistry and related courses is typical: 

FirstYear: CHM 1 1 1, 1 1 1L, 122, 122L; MTH 111,112 

Sophomore: CHM 230, 260; PHY 1 1 1 or 113, 114 

Junior: CHM 341 , 341 L, and one upper-level elective 

Senior: Either CHM 381 , 382, 383, 391, or 392 and two upper-level electives 



For the BA major with concentration in biochemistry and biophysics, the following schedule of 
chemistry and related courses is typical: 

FirstYear: CHM 1 1 1, 1 1 1 L, 122, 122L; MTH 111,112 

Sophomore: One BIO elective; CHM 223, 223L, 230, 260; PHY 1 1 1 or 1 13, 1 14 

Junior: One BIO elective; CHM 341 , 341 L, 370, 370L, 391 or 392 (or substitute); PHY 141 

Senior: Two upper-level CHM electives and one PHY elective 

For variations in the schedules above, the student should consult a member of the faculty in 
chemistry. 



108. Everyday Chemistry. (4h) Introduction to chemistry for non-science majors. Laboratory cov- 
ers experimental aspects of topics discussed in lecture. Students may not receive credit for both 
CHM 108 and CHM 111. Lab— two hours. (D, QR) 

*1 1 1 . College Chemistry. (3h) Fundamental chemical principles. C— CHM lllL. (D, QR) 

*1 n L. College Chemistry Lab. (Ih) Laboratory covers experimental aspects of basic concepts. 
Lab— three hours. C— CHM 111. 

120. Physics and Chemistry of the Environment. (4h) Coheres the basic physical and chemical pro- 
cesses in the earth's atmosphere, biosphere and the oceans. It consists of two parts: 1) chemical 
processes in the environment such as element cycles and the chemistry of the pollutants in air 
and water and, 2) physical aspects of the environment such as solar energy and the atmosphere, 
and the physics of weather and climate. Lab — three hours. Also listed as PHY 120. (D, QR) 

*122. Introduction to Organic Chemistry. (3h) Principles and reactions of organic chemistry. 
P— CHM 111. C— CHM 122L. (D) 

*122L. Introduction to Organic Chemistry Lab. (Ih) Lab— four hours. P— CHM 111. C— CHM 122. 



* The lecture and corresponding lab are strict corequisites of each other. A student must register 
for both during the same semester. (However, either can be repeated independently if the student 
wishes.) 

CHEMISTRY 92 



*223. Organic Chemistry II. (3h) Principles and reactions of organic chemistry and introductory 
biochemistry. P— CHM 122. C— CHM 223L. 

*223L. Organic Chemistry II Lab. (Ih) Lab— four hours. P— CHM 122. C— CHM 223. 

230. Analytical Biochemistry. (2h) Survey of laboratory methods used to determine the composi- 
tion of biological samples. 7.5 weeks. Lab — four hours. P — CHM 122. 

260. Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry. (2h) Introductory thermodynamics; descriptive inor- 
ganic and bio-inorganic chemistry. 7.5 weeks. Lab — four hours. P — CHM 230. 

301, 302. Elective Research. (Oh, Oh) P— POL 

334. Chemical Analysis. (4h) Theoretical and practical applications of modern methods of chemi- 
cal analysis. Lab— four hours (CHM 334L). P— CHM 341, 341L, or POL 

*341 . Physical Chemistry I. (3h) Fundamentals of thermodynamics and phenomenological kinet- 
ics, and introductory computational methods. Also listed as PHY 341. P — CHM 260, MTH 111, 
PHY 111 or 113, and 114. C— CHM 341L, MTH 112, (PHY 113, with POT). 

*341 L. Physical Chemistry I Lab. (Ih) Lab— four hours. P— CHM 260, MTH 111, PHY 113-114. 
C— CHM 341, MTH 112. 

*342. Physical Chemistry HA. (3h) Fundamentals of quantum mechanics, statistical thermo- 
dynamics, and introductory computational methods. P— CHM 341, MTH 111-112, PHY 113-114. 
C— CHM 342L, (PHY 114, with POI). 

*342L. Physical Chemistry IIA Lab. (Ih) Lab— four hours. P— CHM 341, MTH 111-112, PHY 113- 
114. C— CHM 342 or 344. 

*344. Physical Chemistry MB. (3h) Fundamentals of quantum mechanics, statistical thermo- 
dynamics, and introductory computational methods. Lab — four hours. P — CHM 341, MTH 111- 
112 and 301 (or 113), PHY 113-114. C— CHM 342L, (PHY 114, with POI). 

356, 357. Chemical Spectroscopy. (1.5h, 1.5h) Fundamental aspects of the theory and applica- 
tion of chemical spectroscopy, as found in the areas of analytical, inorganic, organic, physical, 
and biological chemistry. Emphasis varies. Seven-week courses. May be repeated for credit. 
P— CHM 342 or 344, or POI. 

*361 . Inorganic Chemistry. (3h) Principles and reactions of inorganic chemistry. P — CHM 341. 
C— CHM 361L or POI. 

*361 L. Inorganic Chemistry Lab. (Ih) Lab— four hours. P— CHM 341. C— CHM 361. 

370. Biochemistry: Macromolecules and Metabolism. (3h) Lecture course introducing the prin- 
ciples of biochemistry including structure, function, and biosynthesis of biological molecules, 
analysis of enzyme function and activity, bioenergetics, and regulation of metaboUc pathways. 
Also Usted as BIO 370. P— BIO 214 and either CHM 223 or 230, or POI. 



* The lecture and corresponding lab are strict corequisites of each other. A student must register 
for both during the same semester. (However, either can be repeated independently if the student 
wishes.) 



93 



CHEMISTRY 



370L. Biochemistry: Macromolecules and Metabolism Lab. (Ih) Laboratory emphasizes approach- 
es for isolation and analysis of proteins and enzymes. Also listed as BIO 370L. P — BIO 214 and 
either CHM 223 or 230, or POL C or P— CHM 370. 

372. Biochemistry: Protein and Nucleic Acid Structure and Function. (3h) Special topics in bio- 
chemistry, including catalytic mechanisms of enzymes and ribozymes, use of sequence and 
structure databases, and molecular basis of disease and drug action. P — CHM 223 and 370 (or 
BIO 370). 

381, 382. Chemistry Seminar. (Oh, Oh) Discussions of contemporary research. Attendance required 
of BS chemistry majors in the junior and senior years. 

383. Chemical Literature. (Ih) Introduction to the chemical literature and searching techniques 
for the acquisition of chemical information. P — CHM 122. 

391, 392. Undergraduate Research. (1.5h, 1.5h) Undergraduate research. Lab — eight hours. 
May be repeated for credit. 

Classical Languages (CLA) 

Chair John L. Andronica 

Professors John L. Andronica, Mary L. B. Pendergraft, Robert W. Ulery Jr. 

Associate Professor James T. Powell 

Adjunct Associate Professor Darlene R. May 

Adjunct Instructor Dorothy M. Westmoreland 

Visiting Jordanian Fulbright Scholar Bilal Humeidan 

The Department of Classical Languages offers majors and minors in three areas: Greek, Latin, 
and classical studies. The department also offers courses in Modem Standard Arabic language 
and conversation, and Arabic literature. 

A major in Greek requires twenty-seven hours in the department beyond Greek 112. Twenty-one 
of these hours must be in Greek courses; Greek 225 and CLA 275 are required. 

A minor in Greek requires fifteen hours: Greek 153; two 200-level courses in Greek; CLA 275; and 
one additional course in Greek (200-level), Latin, or classics. 

A major in Latin requires twenty-seven hours in the department beyond Latin 153. Eighteen of 
these hours must be in Latin courses; Latin 250 and CLA 276 are required. 

A minor in Latin requires fifteen hours: three 200-level courses in Latin; CLA 276; and one ad- 
ditional course in Greek, Latin (200-level), or classics. 

A major in classical studies requires thirty hours. A minimum of twenty-four hours must be 
taken in the department. The following are required: 

a. One 200-level course in Greek or Latin (prerequisites to this course do not count toward 
the thirty required hours); 

b. CLA 275 and CLA 276; 

c. CLA 281; 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 94 



d. At least one course from the following: ART 241. (Ancient Art); ART 244. (Greek Art); 
ART 245. (Roman Art); HST 308. (Alexander the Great); PHI 232. (Ancient Greek Philoso- 
phy); PHI 331. (Plato); PHI 332. (Aristotle); POL 271. (Classical Political Thought); REL 
314. (Ancient Israel and Her Neighbors). Other courses may be substituted by permis- 
sion of the department. 

A minor in classical studies requires a minimum of eighteen hours in the department, of which 
no more than seven may be in Greek or Latin courses. CLA 275 or 276 and CLA 281 are re- 
quired. 

The requirements for certification to teach Latin in high school are the same as the require- 
ments for a major in Latin. A major in classical studies may serve as an appropriate part of the 
program of studies required for certification to teach Latin in high school. A student wishing to 
secure this certification should confer with the chair of the department. 

Honors. Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to participate in the honors 
program in Latin, Greek, or classical studies. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in 
Latin," "Honors in Greek," or "Honors in Classical Studies," a student must complete an hon- 
ors research project and pass a comprehensive oral examination. For additional information, 
members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. (Refer to the section "Honors Study" 
in this bulletin for minimum college requirements.) 

Greek 

111,112. Elementary Greek. (4h, 4h) Introduction to the language; provides a foundation for 
reading the ancient authors. 

153. Intermediate Greek. (3h) Review of grammar; readings in classical authors. P — Greek 112 
or equivalent. 

21 1. Plato. (3h) Selections from the dialogues of Plato. P — Greek 153 or equivalent. 

212. Homer. (3h) Selections from the Iliad and the Odyssey. P — Greek 153 or equivalent. 

221. Greek Readings. (1.5h or 3h) Designed to meet individual needs and interests. Course may 
be repeated for a total of six credit hours. P — POL 

225. Advanced Grammar and Composition. (3h) Intensive work in morphology and syntax, 
with practice in composition and stylistic analysis of selected readings. P — Greek 200-level 
or equivalent. 

231. The Greek New Testament. (3h) Selections from the Greek New Testament. P — Greek 
200-level or equivalent. 

241. Greek Tragedy. (3h) Close study of a selected tragedy or tragedies. Includes consideration 
of the origin and history of Greek tragedy, with collateral reading of other tragedies in English 
translation. Seminar. P — Greek 200-level or equivalent. 

242, Greek Comedy. (3h) Close study of a selected comedy or comedies of Aristophanes. In- 
cludes consideration of the origin and history of Greek comedy, with collateral reading of other 
comedies in English translation. Seminar. P — Greek 200-level or equivalent. 

291, 292. Honors in Greek. (1.5h, 1.5h) Directed research for honors paper. P — POD. 



95 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 



Latin 

111,112. Elementary Latin. (3h, 3h) Introduction to the language; provides a foundation for 
reading in the ancient authors. 

113. Intensive Elementary Latin, (4h) Introduction to the language; covers the material of Latin 

111 and 112 in one semester. Not open to students who have had Latin 111 or 112. 

120. Reading Medieval Latin. (1.5h, 3h) Introduction to post-classical Latin with readings in 
selected works from late antiquity and the Middle Ages. P — Latin 112 or equivalent. 

153. Intermediate Latin. (4h) Review of grammar and selected introductory readings. P — Latin 

112 or 113. 

21 1. Introduction to Latin Poetry. (3h) Readings from selected poets mainly of the late Republic 
and early Empire, with an introduction to literary criticism. P — Latin 153 or equivalent. 

212. Introduction to Latin Prose. (3h) Readings primarily from the works of Cicero, with atten- 
tion to their artistry and historical context. P — Latin 153 or equivalent. 

216. Roman Lyric Poetry. (3h) Interpretation and evaluation of lyric poetry through readings 
from the poems of Catullus and Horace. P — Latin 153 or equivalent. 

218. Roman Epic Poetry. (3h) Readings in the epics of Virgil and Ovid, with attention to their 
position in the epic tradition. P — Latin 153 or equivalent. 

221. Roman Historians. (3h) Readings in the works of Sallust, Livy, or Tacitus, with attention 
to the historical background and the norms of ancient historiography. P — Latin 200-level or 
equivalent. 

225. Roman Epistolography. (3h) Selected readings from the correspondence of Cicero and PUny 
the Younger and the verse epistles of Horace and Ovid. P — Latin 200-level or equivalent. 

226. Roman Comedy. (3h) Readings of selected comedies of Plautus and Terence, with a study of 
the traditions of comedy and dramatic techniques. P — Latin 200-level or equivalent. 

231. Roman Elegy. (3h) Readings from the poems of Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid, with study 
of the elegiac tradition. P — Latin 200-level or equivalent. 

241. Roman Satire. (3h) Selected readings from Horace and Juvenal, with attention to the origin 
and development of hexameter satire. P — Latin 200-level or equivalent. 

243. Latin Readings. (1.5h or 3h) Designed to meet individual needs and interests. Course may 
be repeated for a total of six credit hours. P — POL 

250. Advanced Grammar and Composition. (3h) Intensive work in morphology and syntax, with 
practice in composition and stylistic analysis of selected readings. P — Latin 200-level or equiva- 
lent. 

260. Seminar in Latin Poetry. (3h) Advanced study in selected authors and topics. A research 
paper is required. P — Latin 200-level or equivalent. 

280. Seminar in Latin Prose. (3h) Advanced study in selected authors and topics. A research 
paper is required. P — Latin 200-level or equivalent. 

291, 292. Honors in Latin. (1.5h, 1.5h) Directed research for the honors paper. P — POD. 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 95 



Arabic 

111,112. Elementary Arabic. (3h, 3h) A two-semester course designed for students with no 
knowledge of the language. Focuses on developing proficiency in reading, writing, listening, 
and speaking skills in Modem Standard Arabic. Introduction to Arabic script and basic gram- 
mar, with oral and written drills and reading of simple texts. 

153. Intermediate Arabic. (4h) Review of grammar and focus on the acquisition of more complex 
grammatical structures, vocabulary building, and expansion of reading, writing, and listening 
skills in Modem Standard Arabic. P — Arabic 112 

213. Introduction to Arabic Literature. (3h) Reading of selected texts in Arabic, ranging from 
the Quran to medieval fiction, nonfiction works, and modern short stories, for the purpose of 
building vocabulary and reading skills, expanding knowledge of grammatical structures, and 
deepening cultural understanding. P — Arabic 153 or equivalent. 

218. Basic Arabic Conversation, (1.5h or 3h) A language course based on cultural material 
intended to develop students' aural skills and oral proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic by 
increasing vocabulary and reinforcing command of grammar. P — Arabic 153 or equivalent. 

288. Arabic Individual Study. (1.5h or 3h) Course may be repeated for a total of six credit hours. 
P— POI. 

Classics 

151. Ethics in Greece and Rome. (1.5h) Reading and discussion of Aristotle's Ethics and Cicero's 
On Moral Duties, with attention to our own ethical dilemmas. A knowledge of the Greek and 
Latin languages is not required. 

252. Women in Antiquity. (3h) Explores the place of women in Greek and Roman society through 
the study of a wide range of primary sources, literary and non-literary. A knowledge of the 
Greek and Latin languages is not required. (CD) 

255. Classical Epic: Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid. (3h) Study of the three principal epic poems from an- 
cient Greece and Rome. A knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. (D) 

259. Virgil and His English Legacy. (3h) Study of Virgil's Eclogues, Georgics, and selected passages 
of the Aeneid, and their influence on English literature, using translations and original works by 
writers of the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries, including Spenser, Marlowe, Milton, 
Dry den, and Pope. Knowledge of Latin is not required. Also listed as ENG 319. 

261 . Greek Myth. (3h) Consideration, principally through close study of selected literary works, 
of Greek myth in its various forms, primary (archaic and classical periods) and secondary (Hel- 
lenistic and Roman); the course also considers Greek myth's afterlife in the modem period. A 
knowledge of the Greek language is not required. (D) 

263. Greek Tragedy. (3h) Study of the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. A knowl- 
edge of the Greek language is not required. (D) 

264. Greek and Roman Comedy. (3h) Representative works of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, 
and Terence, with attention to the origins and development of comedy. A knowledge of the 
Greek and Latin languages is not required. (D) 



97 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 



274. Special Topics. (1.5-3h) Special topics in Classical literature and culture. May be repeated 
for credit. 

275. The Age of Pericles. (3h) Study of Greek culture in all its aspects during the fifth century. 
A knowledge of the Greek language is not required. (CD) 

276. The Age of Augustus. (3h) Study of Roman culture in all its aspects during the early Empire. 
A knowledge of the Latin language is not required. (CD) 

281 . Seminar in Classical Studies. (3h) Offered by members of the faculty on topics of their 
choice. A knowledge of Greek and Latin languages is not required. May be repeated for credit. 
P— Any CLA 200-level course. 

285. Interdisciplinary Seminar in the Greco-Roman World. (3h) Seminar designed specially to 
meet the needs of students earning the interdisciplinary minor in early Christian studies, but 
is not limited to them. Explores, from various points of view, the culture of the Mediterranean 
world from which Christianity was bom and grew: literature and art, history and economics, 
religions and philosophies. Also listed on as REL 285. Course may be repeated for credit. 

288. Individual Study. (1.5h or 3h) Course may be repeated for a total of six hours. P — POL 

291, 292. Honors in Classical Studies. (L5h, 1.5h) Directed research for the honors paper. 
P— POD. 



Communication (COM) 

Chair Randall Regan 

Reynolds Professor of Film Studies Peter Brunette 

University Distinguished Chair in Communication Ethics 

and Professor of Communication Michael J. Hyde 

Professors Michael David Hazen, Randall G. Regan 

Associate Professors Mary M. Dalten, Marina Krcmar, John T. Llewellyn, Allan D. Louden, 

Ananda Mitra, Margaret D. Zulick 

Assistant Professors Steven M. Giles, Donald Helme 

Visiting Assistant Professor Alessandra Beasley 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Dee Oseroff-Varnell, Linda Petreu 

Lecturer Jack Lucido 

Instructor Ernest S. Jarrett 

Adjunct Instructors Connie Chesner, Susan L. Faust, Melissa Painter Greene, 

Danielle Powell, Ross Smith 

Debate Coach Ross K. Smith 

A major in communication requires thirty hours, at least twelve of which must be at the 300- 
level. All majors are required to take courses 100, 110 or 102, 220 and 225 and should begin their 
study of communication with these courses. An overall minimum grade point average of 2.0 in 
all communication courses attempted is required for graduation. 

The Department of Communication offers its majors the opportunity to concentrate in 
special areas of study. Communication majors may choose to concentrate in communication 
science, media studies, or rhetorical studies. Students may also opt to choose courses across the 
concentrations as a general communication major. 



COMMUNICATION 



98 



In addition to the major course requirements, COM 100, 110 or 102, 220, and 225, students 
who want to declare a concentration must successfully complete five courses within a particular 
concentration. Students may declare two concentrations within the department. The major 
course requirements remain in effect for those students, and they must take a minimum of 
eighteen hours at the 300-level. Students may not count courses used to meet the required five 
courses within a particular concentration to fulfill requirements for a second concentration. 
A list of courses approved to fulfill the concentrations in communication science, media studies, 
and rhetorical studies is maintained by the communicaHon department. Students declaring a 
concentration must do so prior to the beginning of their final semester. 

A minor in communication requires eighteen hours, at least three of which must be at the 300- 
level, and shall include courses 100, 110 or 102, and 220 or 225. An overall minimum grade 
point average of 2.0 in all communication courses attempted is required for graduation. 

Students may enroll in up to three hours of practicum in any semester. For three hours of 
internship credit, students need a minimum of 120 on-site contact hours; applications for three 
hours of practicum in one semester need to be approved by a faculty supervisor, the internship 
director, and /or the director of undergraduate studies. Students can earn a maximum of six 
hours practicum, only three hours of which may be counted toward a major in communication. 
Conununicatlon 280 and 281 are open to majors and minors only who satisfy departmental 
requirements. 

Honors. Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in communication. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Commu- 
nication," students must pass the departmental honors courses (398 and 399), complete a senior 
research project, and satisfactorily defend their work in an oral examination. For more details, 
consult faculty members in the department. 

Finally, no student may take more than a total of six hours in COM 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, and 
285 combined, and only three hours may count toward a major in communication. 

100. Introduction to Communication and Rhetoric. (3h) Introduction to the theories, research, and 
analysis of verbal and nonverbal processes by which human beings share meanings and influ- 
ence one another. (D) 

102. Debate and Advocacy. (3h) The use of argumentative techniques in oral advocacy: research, 
speeches, and debate. (D) 

110. Public Speaking. (3h) Study of the theory and practice of public address. Lab experiences in 
the preparation, delivery, and critique of informative and persuasive speeches. (D) 

113. Interpersonal Communication. (3h) Introduction to interpersonal communication theory, 
research and principles. (D) 

114. Group Communication. (3h) Introduction to the theory and practice of group interaction 
and decision-making. Features lectures and discussions of theory and includes opportunities to 
participate in formal and informal group processes. (D) 

116. On-Camera Performance. (3h) Introduces students to the theory and practice of performing 
for the camera. Covers basic method acting, newscasting, and other performance formats. Also 
listed as THE 141. 



99 



COMMUNICATION 



1 1 7. Writing for Public Relations and Advertising. (1.5h, 3h) Principles and techniques of public 
relations and applied advertising. Students use case studies to develop public relations and 
advertising strategies. Also listed as JOU 286. P — POL 

140. Information and Disinformation on the Internet. (1.5h) Examination of information gather- 
ing practices on the Internet and World Wide Web. Students develop and apply standards for 
evaluating information through analysis of Web sites dealing with important and controversial 
topics. 

212. Introduction to Production and Theory. (3h) Introduction to the theory and practice of 
media production, including critical and aesthetic theories, scriptwriting, producing, directing, 
photography, sound recording, editing, and standards of operation for the production facilities 
and equipment. This course is a prerequisite for 213, 214, 215, and 310. 

213. Media Production: Documentary. (3h) Introduction to the theory and practice of producing 
nonfiction works in film or video, including conventional documentary forms and autobio- 
graphical or experimental works. P — COM 212. 

214. Media Production: Narrative. (3h) Introduction to the theory and practice of producing nar- 
rative works in film and video. P — COM 212. 

21 5. Broadcast Journalism. (3h) Introduction to the theory and practice of broadcast journal- 
ism. Topics include ethics, technology, and the media as industry, and projects address writing, 
producing, and performing for radio and television. P — COM 212. 

216. Media Production: Studio. (3h) Introduction to the theory and practice of producing studio 
programs in video. 

220. Empirical Research in Communication. (3h) Introduction to methodological design and 
univariate statistics as used in communication research. 

225. Historical/Critical Research in Communication. (3h) Introduces students to the historical and 
critical analysis of rhetoric. Examines current methods of rhetorical criticism with a view to 
researching and composing a critical paper in the field. 

245. Introduction to Mass Communication. (3h) A historical survey of mass media and an exami- 
nation of major contemporary media issues. Also listed as JOU 275. (D) 

246. Introduction to Film. (3h) Introduction to the aesthetics of motion pictures through a study 
of the basic elements of film such as cinematography, editing, sound, lighting, and color. (D) 

270. Special Seminar. (l-3h) Examination of selected topics in communication. 

280. Communication Internship I. (1.5h) Individual communication internships to be approved, 
supervised, and evaluated by an appropriate faculty adviser. Pass/Fail only. P — POI. 

281. Communication Internship II. (1.5h) Individual communication internships to be approved, 
supervised, and evaluated by an appropriate faculty adviser. Pass/Fail only. P — POI. 

282. Debate Practicum I. (1.5h) Individual projects in debate to be approved, supervised, and 
evaluated by an appropriate faculty adviser. Pass/Fail only. P — POI. 

283. Debate Practicum II. (1.5h) Individual projects in debate to be approved, supervised, and 
evaluated by an appropriate faculty adviser. Pass/Fail only. P — POI. 



COMMUNICATION jqO 



284. Production Practicum I. (1.5h) Individual projects or collaborations with appropriate profes- 
sionals in media production to be approved, supervised, and evaluated by a faculty adviser. 
Pass/Fail only. P— POL 

285. Production Practicum II. (1.5h) Individual projects or collaborations with appropriate pro- 
fessionals in media production to be approved, supervised, and evaluated by a faculty adviser. 
Pass/Fail only. P— POL 

286. Individual Study. (l-3h) Directed study in an area of interest to be approved and supervised 
by a faculty adviser. P — POL 

287. Research Practicum I. (1.5) Credit opportunities for students to collaborate with faculty on 
research projects. Awards credit to students assisting faculty with research initiatives led by the 
faculty. Projects may be short term, culminating in presentation or publication, or longitudinal, 
where the student participates in an on-going effort. Pass /Fail only. P — POL 

288. Research Practicum II. (1.5) Awards credits to students assisting faculty with research initia- 
tives led by the faculty. Projects may be short term, culminating in presentation or publication, 
or longitudinal, where the student participates in an on-going effort. Pass /Fail only. P — POL 

300. Classical Rhetoric. (3h) Study of major writings in Greek and Roman rhetorical theory from 
the Sophists to Augustine. Offered in alternate years. 

301. Semantics and Language in Communication. (3h) Study of how meaning is created by sign 
processes. Among the topics studied are language theory, semiotics, speech act theory, and 
pragmatics. Also listed as LIN 301. 

302. Argumentation Theory. (3h) Examination of argumentation theory and criticism; examines 
both theoretical issues and social practices. Offered in alternate years. 

303S. Directing the Forensic Program. (1.5h, 3h) Pragmatic study of the methods of directing 
high school and college forensics with work in the High School Debate Workshop. Offered in the 
summer. 

304. Freedom of Speech. (3h) Examination of the philosophical and historical traditions, sig- 
nificant cases, and contemporary controversies concerning freedom of expression. Offered in 
alternate years. 

305. Communication and Ethics. (3h) Study of the role of commvmication in ethical controversies. 

306. Seminar in Rhetorical Theory: Burke & Bakhtin. (3h) Examines the language theories of Ken- 
neth Burke and Mikhail Bakhtin in relation to contemporary rhetorical theory. 

310. Advanced Media Production. (3h) Students produce advanced projects in either film or 
video over which they assume significant creative control. P — COM 212 and at least one of 213, 
214, or 215. 

311. Film Theory and Criticism. (3h) Critical study of film through an analysis of selected theo- 
ries, filmmakers, and film texts. P — COM 246 or POL 

312. Film History to 1945. (3h) Survey of the developments of motion pictures to 1945. Includes 
lectures, readings, reports, and screenings. 

313. Film History since 1945. (3h) Survey of the development of motion pictures from 1946 to the 
present day. Includes lectures, readings, reports, and screenings. 



101 



COMMUNICATION 



314. Mass Communication Theory. (3h) Theoretical approaches to the role of communication in 
reaching mass audiences and its relationship to other levels of communication. P — COM 245. 

315. Communication and Technology. (3h) Exploration of how communication technologies 
influence the social, political, and organizational practices of everyday life. 

316. Screenwriting. (3h) Introduction to narrative theory as v^^ell as examination of the role of 
the screenwriter in the motion picture industry, the influence of genre on screenwriting, and 
exploration of nontraditional narrative structures. Students complete an original, feature-length 
screenplay. 

317. Communication and Popular Culture. (3h) Explores the relationship between contemporary 
media and popular culture from a cultural studies perspective using examples from media 
texts. 

330. Communication and Conflict. (3h) Review of the various theoretical perspectives on conflict 
and negotiation as well as methods for managing relational conflict. 

331. Communication, Terrorism, and IHostage Negotiation. (3h) Examines domestic and interna- 
tional terrorism as grounded in extant communication theory, with emphasis on explicating the 
role that communication plays in current conceptualizations and responses to terrorism. 

335. Survey of Organizational Communication. (3h) Overview of the role of communication in 
constituting and maintaining the pattern of activities that sustain the modern organization. 

336. Organizational Rhetoric. (3h) Explores the persuasive nature of organizational messages — 
those exchanged between organizational members and those presented on behalf of the organi- 
zation as a whole. Offered in alternate years. 

337. Rhetoric of Institutions. (3h) Study of the communication practices of institutions as they 
seek to gain and maintain social legitimacy. Offered in alternate years. 

338. African-American Rhetoric. (3h) Explores how African Americans have invented a public 
voice in the twentieth century. Focuses on how artistic cultural expression, in particular, has 
shaped black public speech. (CD) 

340. American Rhetorical Movements to 1 900. (3h) Examines the interrelation of American rhe- 
torical movements through the nineteenth century by reading and analyzing original speeches 
and documents with emphasis on antislavery and women's rights. 

341 . American Rhetorical Movements since 1 900. (3h) Examines the interrelation of American 
rhetorical movements in the twentieth century by reading and analyzing original speeches 
and documents. Among the movements addressed are labor, civil rights, student radicals, and 
women's liberation. 

342. Political Communication. (3h) Study of electoral communication, including candidate and 
media influences on campaign speeches, debates, and advertising. 

343. Presidential Rhetoric. (3h) Examines theory and practice of speechmaking and mediated 
presidential communication. 

350. Intercultural Communication. (3h) Introduction to the study of communication phenomena 
between individuals and groups with different cultural backgrounds. Offered in alternate years. 
(CD) 



COMMUNICATION ^qZ 



351. Comparative Communication, (1.5h, 3h) Comparison of comxnunicative and linguistic pro- 
cesses in one or more national cultures with those of the United States. Also listed as LIN 351 
and INS 349. Credit not given for both COM 351A and INS 349. (CD) 

351 A. ]apan (CD) 351 D. Multiple Countries (CD) 

351B. Russia (CD) 351E. China (CD) 

351C. Great Britain (CD) 

352. Interpersonal Seminar. (3h) Advanced study of theories and research in one or more of the 
specialized concentrations of interpersonal communication. 

353. Persuasion. (3h) Examination of theories and research concerning the process of social 
influence in contemporary society. 

354. International Communication. (3h) In-depth look at the role of mass media in shaping com- 
munication between and about cultures using examples from traditional and emerging media 
systems. 

355. Health Communication. (3h) Examination of theories, research, and processes of health 
communication in contemporary society. 

370. Special Topics. (l-3h) Examination of topics not covered in the regular curriculum. 

380. Great Teachers. (Ih, 1.5h, 3h) Intensive study of the ideas of three noted scholars and teach- 
ers in the field of communication. Students interact with each teacher during a two- to three- 
day visit to Wake Forest. 

398. Honors in Communication I. (1.5h) Intensive research in an area of special interest for se- 
lected seniors who wish to graduate with departmental honors. Fall semester only. P — POD. 

399. Honors in Communication II. (1.5h) Intensive research in an area of special interest for se- 
lected seniors who wish to graduate with departmental honors. Spring semester only. P — POD. 

Computer Science (CSC) 

Chair Stan J. Thomas 

Reynolds Professor Robert J. Plemmons 

Reynolds Professor of Computational Biophysics Jacquelyn S. Fetrow 

Associate Professors Jennifer J. Burg, Daniel A. Canas, Errin W. Fulp, David J. John, 

Stan J. Thomas, Todd C.Torgersen 

Assistant Professors V. Paul Pauca, William H. Turkett Jr. 

Lecturer in Digital Media Yue-Ling Wong 

Lecturer Brian A. Kell 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Timothy E. Miller 

Adjunct Instructor M.Thomas Malinzak 

Visiting Professor Michael W. Berry 

A major in computer science requires thirty-seven hours in computer science and three courses 
in mathemiatics. The courses in computer science must include 111, 112, 211, 221, 222, 231, and 
241. The required courses in mathematics are 112, 117, and 121 or 302. Either MTH 256 or 357 is 
also recommended for students considering graduate work in computer science. All students 



103 



COMPUTER SCIENCE 



anticipating a major in computer science are encouraged to take CSC 111 and the appropriate 
mathematics courses during their first year of college. Potential majors should consult a major 
adviser in the department for assistance in planning an appropriate course of study. 

A minor in computer science requires four computer science courses of at least three hours each 
and numbered higher than 110; MTH 117; and an additional three hours in mathematics other 
than MTH 105. 

A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in courses that comprise a major or minor in the depart- 
ment is required for graduation. 

Students with a special interest in multimedia development may wish to consider a program 
of study that combines computer science and digital art. Advisers in either the computer sci- 
ence or the art department can provide further information on coordinating a computer science 
major with an art minor, or vice versa. 

Honors. Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Computer Science," stu- 
dents must satisfactorily complete a senior research paper and have a minimum grade point 
average of 3.5 in the major and 3.0 in all college course work. For additional information, mem- 
bers of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

Students who are enrolled at Wake Forest University may not take courses in computer science 
at other institutions to satisfy divisional requirements. 

101. Overview of Computer Science. (4h) Lecture and laboratory. Introduction to the organi- 
zation and use of computers. Topics include computer architecture, systems, theory, logic, 
programming, the Internet, multimedia, and ethical, legal, and social issues. Does not count 
toward the computer science major or minor. Lab — two hours. (D) 

108. Introduction to Programming. (4h) Lecture and laboratory. Introduction to the basic con- 
cepts of computer programming and problem solving for students with varied backgrounds 
and no prior programming experience. The programming language used and the focus vary by 
instructor. Topics may include multimedia programming, game programming, graphic anima- 
tion, and scientific computing. Does not count toward the computer science major or minor. 
Lab — two hours. (D) 

111. Introduction to Computer Science. (4h) Lecture and laboratory. Rigorous introduction to the 
process of algorithmic problem solving and programming in a modern programming language. 
Recommended as the first course for students considering a major or minor in computer sci- 
ence. Lab — two hours. P — Non-declared majors/minors only or POL (D) 

112. Fundamentals of Computer Science. (4h) Lecture and laboratory. Problem solving and pro- 
gram construction using top-down design, data abstraction, and object-oriented programming. 
Linear data structures, recursion, and software development tools are introduced. Lab — two 
hours. P— CSC 111 or POL (D) 

165. Problem Solving Seminar. (Ih) Weekly seminar designed for students to develop their prob- 
lem solving skills designing and implementing software. Does not count toward the computer 
science major or minor. May be taken twice. Pass/Fail. P — CSC 112. 

191 . Special Topics. (Ih, 2h, or 3h) Topics in computer science that are not covered in regular 



COMPUTER SCIENCE J04 



courses or that give special practice in skills used in other courses. Not to be counted toward 
the major or minor in computer science. May be taken more than once if the topic changes. 

193. Independent Study. (Ih, 2h, or 3h) Independent study directed by a faculty adviser, not to 
be counted toward the computer science major or minor. By prearrangement. 

21 1. Computer Organization. (4h) Lecture and laboratory. Computer organization from the 
perspective of instructions, including the central processor, busses, input and output units, and 
memory units. Weekly two-hour laboratory covers combinational logic, loaders and linkers, 
assembly language, address computation, and other architecture-related functions. Lab — two 
hours. P— CSC 112 and MTH 117. (D) 

221. Data Structures and Algorithms I. (3h) Study, analysis, and implementation of abstract data 
structures such as stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. Complexity analysis of algorithms that 
operate upon these structures. P — CSC 112. P or C — MTH 117. (D) 

222. Data Structures and Algorithms II. (3h) A continuation of the study, analysis, and implemen- 
tation of abstract data structures. The complexity of algorithms is studied more rigorously than 
in CSC 221, and complexity classes are introduced. P— CSC 221 and MTH 111. (QR) 

231. Programming Languages. (4h) Lecture and laboratory. Comparative study of programming 
language paradigms, including imperative languages, functional programming, logic program- 
ming, and object-oriented programming. S5mtax, semantics, parsing, grammars, and issues in 
language design are covered. Lab — two hours. P — CSC 112 and MTH 117. 

241 . Computer Systems. (3h) Introduction to concepts of operating systems and networks 
including processor and memory management, concurrency, and protocol independent data 
communications. P — CSC 211 and 221. 

311. Computer Architecture. (3h) In-depth study of computer system and architecture design. 
Topics include processor design, memory hierarchy, external storage devices, interface design, 
and parallel architectures. P — CSC 211. 

321. Database Management Systems. (3h) Introduction to large-scale database management sys- 
tems. Topics include data independence, database models, query languages, security, integrity, 
and concurrency. P — CSC 221. 

331 . Object-Oriented Software Engineering. (3h) Study of software design and implementa- 
tion from an object-oriented perspective, covering abstraction, encapsulation, data protection, 
inheritance, composition, polymorphism, and dynamic vs. static binding. Students practice 
software engineering principles through team projects. P — CSC 221 and 231. 

333. Principles of Compiler Design. (3h) Study of techniques for compiling computer languages 
including scanning, parsing, translating, and generating and optimizing code. P — CSC 211 
and 221. 

341 . Operating Systems. (3h) Study of the different modules that compose a modern operating 
system. In-depth study of concurrency, processor management, memory management, file 
management, and security. P — CSC 241. 

343. Internet Protocols. (3h) Study of wide area connectivity through interconnection networks. 
Emphasis is on Internet architecture and protocols. Topics include addressing, routing, multi- 
casting, quality of service, and network security. P — CSC 241. 



105 



COMPUTER SCIENCE 



346. Parallel Computation. (3h) Study of hardware and software issues in parallel computing. 
Topics include a comparison of parallel architectures and network topologies, and an introduc- 
tion to parallel algorithms, languages, programming, and applications. P — CSC 222 and 241. 

352. Numerical Linear Algebra. (3h) Numerical methods for solving matrix and related problems 
in science and engineering. Topics include systems of linear equations, least squares methods, 
and eigenvalue computations. Special emphasis given to parallel matiix computations. Begin- 
ning knowledge of a programming language such as Pascal, FORTRAN, or C is required. Credit 
is not allowed for both CSC 352 and MTH 326. P— CSC 111 and MTH 112, and MTH 121 or 302. 

355. Introduction to Numerical Methods. (3h) Numerical computations on modem computer 
architectures; floating-point arithmetic and round-off error. Programming in a scientific/en- 
gineering language such as MATLAB, C, or FORTRAN. Algorithms and computer techniques 
for the solution of problems such as roots of functions, approximation, integration, systems of 
linear equations, and least squares methods. Credit not allowed for both CSC 355 and MTH 355. 
P— CSC 111 and MTH 112, and MTH 121 or 302. 

361. Digital Media. (3h) Introduction to digital media covering sampling and quantization, reso- 
lution, color representation, multimedia file formats, data encoding and compression, multime- 
dia network issues, stieaming data, and multimedia programming. P — CSC 221 and MTH 111. 

363. Computer Graphics. (3h) Study of software and hardware techniques in computer graphics. 
Topics include line and polygon drawing, hidden line and surface techniques, tiansformations, 
and ray tiacing. P— CSC 221 and MTH 121 or 302. 

365. Image Processing Fundamentals. (3h) Study of the basic theory and algorithms for image 
enhancement, restoration, segmentation, and analysis. P — CSC 221 and MTH 121 or 302. 

371. Artificial Intelligence. (3h) Intioduction to problems in artificial intelligence. Knowledge 
representation and heuristic search in areas such as planning, machine learning, pattern recog- 
nition, and theorem proving. P — CSC 222. 

385. Bioinformatics. (3h) Intioduction to bioinformatics and computing techniques essential to 
current biomedical research. Topics include genome and protein sequence and protein structure 
databases, algorithms for bioinformatics research, and computer architecture and environment 
considerations. Also listed as PHY 385. P— CSC 112 or POL 

391 . Selected Topics. (Ih, 2h, or 3h) Topics in computer science that are not studied in regular 
courses or which further examine topics covered in regular courses. P — POL 

393. Individual Study. (Ih, 2h, or 3h) Independent study directed by a faculty adviser. By prear- 
rangement. No more than three hours may be counted toward the computer science major. Not 
to be counted toward the minor in computer science. 



COMPUTER SCIENCE jq^ 



Counseling (CNS) 

Chair Samuel T. Gladding 

Professors John P. Anderson, Samuel T. Gladding, Donna A. Henderson 

Assistant Professors Debbie W. Newsome, Laura J. Veach 

Instructor Pamela Karr 

Adjunct Assistant Professors Robin L. Daniel, John J. Schmidt, 

IVlarianne Schubert, Kenneth W. Simington 

Adjunct Instructors Johnne Armentrout, Paige Bentley, Tania Hoeller-Castillero 

The Department of Counseling offers most courses at the graduate level. The following courses 
are the only courses currently offered at the undergraduate level. 

102. Career Planning. (2h) Covers the three components of the career planning process: (1) per- 
sonal assessment of work-related values, interests and skills; (2) exploration of career options; 
and (3) resume-writing, interviewing, and job search skills. Half semester. 

353. College Student Development. (2h) A course of study for resident advisers that provides 
the skills and knowledge necessary to work successfully with college students in a residence 
environment. Includes student development theory, coping with behavioral problems, crisis 
management, making connections, mediating conflict, and other issues. 

364. Creative Arts in Counseling. (3h) Examines the history, theories, processes, and techniques 
of using the creative arts in counseling with clients throughout the lifespan. Attention is given 
to the visual and performing arts such as drawing, imagery, photography, cartooning, cinema, 
movement, dance, literature, drama, and music. Juniors and seniors only. 



Cultural Resource Preservation (CRP) 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 
Coordinator Assistant Professor of Anthropology Paul Thacker 

The Departments of Anthropology, Art, History, and Sociology offer an interdisciplinary minor 
in cultural resource preservation which gives students preliminary training in the field of his- 
toric preservation and cultural resource management aimed at the protection and enhancement 
of archaeological, historical, and architectural resources. 

The minor requires HST 366. Studies in Historic Preservation (3h), and four other courses for 
a total of fifteen hours. These fifteen hours must be distributed among at least three depart- 
ments. The following courses may be included in the minor. Additional elective courses may 
have been approved since publication of this bulletin. The program coordinator maintains a 
complete list of all approved elective courses. For course descriptions, see the relevant depart- 
ment's listings in this bulletin. 

Electives for Cultural Resource Preservation 

ANT 112. Introduction to Archaeology. (3h) 
305. Museum Anthropology. (4h) 
370. Old World Prehistory. (3h) 



107 



CULTURAL RESOURCE PRESERVATION 



374. Prehistory of North America. (3h) 

378. Conservation Archaeology. (1.5h) 

381., 382. Archaeological Research. (3h, 3h) 
ART 233. American Architecture. (3h) 

275. History of Landscape Architecture. (3h) 

288. Modem Architecture. (3h) 

293. Practicum. (3h) 
HST 398. Individual Shidy (l-3h) 
SOC 151. Principles of Sociology. (3h) 

Students intending to minor in cultural resource preservation should consult the adviser ap- 
pointed from one of the participating departments and listed with the registrar. Students are 
strongly urged to consult the adviser during the first semester of their junior year. Equivalent 
courses must be approved by the adviser. 

Early Christian Studies 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 

Coordinators Associate Professor of Classical Languages Mary Pendergraft 
and Professor of Religion Kenneth G. Hoglund 

The interdisciplinary minor in early Christian studies currently requires eighteen hours. 

A. The student must take the following courses: 

REL 321. Introduction to the New Testament. (3h) or 

324. Early Christian Literature. (3h) 
CLA 276. The Age of Augustus. (3h) 
CLA/REL 285. Interdisciplinary Seminar in the Greco-Roman World. (3h) 

B. The student must take three additional courses (nine additional hours), with no more than 
one course (three hours) from any one department, from the following list. Additional elec- 
tive courses may have been approved since publication of this bulletin. The program coordi- 
nators maintain a complete list of all approved elective courses. For course descriptions, see 
the relevant department's listings in this bulletin. 

Electives for Early Christian Studies 

ART 241. Ancient Art. (3h) 

244. Greek Art. (3h) 

245. Roman Art. (3h) 

396. Art History Seminar. (1.5h, 3h) 
a. Ancient Art / b. Medieval Art 
CLA/Greek 231. The Greek New Testament. (3h) 
HST 315. Greek History (3h) 

316. Rome: Republic and Empire. (3h) 
PHI 232. Ancient Greek Philosophy (3h) 

331. Plato. (3h) 

332. Aristotle. (3h) 



EARLY CHRISTIAN STUDIES 



108 



REL 261. Foundations of Traditional Judaism. (1.5h) 

319. Visions of the End: Jewish and Christian Apocalyptic. (3h) 

320. The Search for Jesus. (3h) 

321. Introduction to the New Testament (3h) 

322. The General Epistles. (3h) 

323. The Parables of Jesus. (3h) 

324. Early Christian Literature. (3h) 

326. Early Christian Theologians: Paul. (3h) 

327. The Story of Jesus. (3h) 

372. History of Christian Thought. (3h) 

East Asian Languages and Cultures (EAL) 

Chair David p. Phillips 

Associate Professors Patrick Moran, David P Phillips 

Assistant Professor Yaohua Shi 

Senior Lecturer YasukoT. Railings 

' Adjunct Instructor Shaozhong Liu 

The department offers majors in Chinese and Japanese, with concentrations in Chinese lan- 
guage, Chinese language and literature, Japanese language, and Japanese language and litera- 
ture. In addition to language proficiency at the level of CHI 201 or JPN 201, the majors require 
ten three-credit-hour courses in language and culture and related courses. Study abroad in 
Japan, China, or Taiwan is also required. Under special circumstances, a student may substitute 
an approved intensive immersion program in the United States for the study abroad require- 
ment, with permission of the department chair. A minimum "C" average is required for all 
courses in the major. 

The majors in Chinese and Japanese require six core courses: three advanced language courses 
(CHI or JPN 220, 230, and 231), a course taken abroad in reading and writing (CHI or JPN 190), 
an introduction to East Asian history and culture (HST 249, EAL 275 or equivalent), and an 
independent research project (EAL 300). The inclusion towards the major of language courses 
taken abroad other than those which are officially designated Wake Forest programs requires 
permission from the department. 

Students have the option of majoring in language, or in language and literature. Majors in 
Chinese or Japanese language require, in addition to the core courses, four elective courses; 
up to two elective courses may be in the other East Asian language. For majors in Chinese or 
Japanese language and literature, in addition to the core courses, three literature courses (EAL/ 
HMN 219, EAL/HMN 221, CHI/JPN 250, CHI 252/JPN 251, or CHI/JPN 350) and one elective 
course outside East Asian languages and cultures are required. One of these three literature 
courses can be a literature in translation course. 

Honors. Highly qualified majors should apply for admission to the honors program in East 
Asian languages and cultures. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Chinese" or 
"Honors in Japanese" following completion of EAL 300, the student must enroll in EAL 302, 
present an honors-quality research paper, successfully defend the paper in an oral examination. 



109 



EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES AND CULTURES 



and earn an overall grade point average of 3.0 with an average of 3.3 on work in courses taken 
as part of the major in Chinese or Japanese. For additional information, students should consult 
members of the department. 

Minors in Chinese language and in Japanese language. Following completion of core courses 
(CHI or JFN 101, 102, 153, and 201) the minors require twelve hours of advanced study in 
the language. The standard sequence consists of CHI or JFN 220, 230, 231, and 190, although 
substitutions are allowed with permission from the department chair. Minor candidates are 
also required to participate in an approved semester educational exchange program in China, 
Taiwan, or Japan. A cumulative C average is required for courses taken in the minor. 

Requests for exceptions to the stated curriculum should be made to the department chair. Elec- 
tive courses should be selected from an approved list in the department chair's office. More 
specific descriptions of each of the majors and course sequences are also available there. 

East Asian Languages and Cultures (EAL) 

170. Understanding Japan. (3h) Understanding Japanese culture and behavior from the struc- 
ture of social units such as family, educational institutions, and sports, artistic, and professional 
organizations. Credit not given for both EAL 170 and EAL 175. Also listed as HMN 170. (CD) 

1 75. Japanese Culture: Insight and Outreach. (3h) Develops an understanding of Japanese culture 
through reading, class discussion, and individual research, with subsequent outreach to area 
high schools through presentations. Credit not given for both EAL 170 and EAL 175. Also listed 
as HMN 175. (CD) 

219. Introduction to Japanese Literature. (3h) Major works of poetry, drama, and fiction from the 
classical and modem periods. Also listed as HMN 219. 

221. Introduction to Chinese Literature. (3h) Readings and discussions in fiction, drama, and 
poetry from the traditional and modem periods. Also listed as HMN 221. 

251 .The Asian-American Experience: Literature and Personal Narratives. (3h) Introduction to the 
writings and narratives of Asian Americans of South and Southeast Asian descent, including 
Asian Americans of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Indian descent. Explores the process of as- 
similation, including the effects of immigration and cultural conflict on literary forms of expres- 
sion, as well as the formation of new cultural identities. Also listed as HMN 251. (CD) 

252. Introduction to Chinese Film. (3h) Introductory study of film from mainland China, Hong 
Kong, and Taiwan from its inception at the turn of the twentieth century to the present. Ex- 
plores Chinese film as an art form, an instrument of political propaganda, and a medium of 
popular entertainment. Also listed as HMN 252. 

275. Survey of East Asian Culture. (3h) Exploration of the cultural, historical, political, and eco- 
nomic development of China and Japan, with an emphasis on cultural shifts that resulted from 
the transition from pre-industrial societies of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to world 
powers of the mid- to late- twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The interaction between 
these cultures will also be examined. (CD) 

300. Independent Research in East Asian Studies. (Ih, 2h, 3h) Supervised independent research 
project on a topic related to China or Japan. Students are expected to draw on their previous 



EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES AND CULTURES 



110 



studies in East Asian languages and cultures and related areas of study in choosing an appro- 
priate topic. Supervision is conducted by a faculty member. Majors are requested to designate 
second advisers in related departments. If the research project is not completed in one semester, 
the course may be repeated once for credit. This course must be taken prior to the last semester 
before graduation. P — POI and permission of chair. 

301. Special Topics. (3h) Selected themes and approaches to East Asian Uterature, drama, culture, 
and film. Topics to be chosen by staff prior to the term the course is offered. May be repeated 
for credit. P— POI. 

302. Honors Seminar. (3h) Writing of a major research paper. P — HAL 300 and POI. 

American Ethnic Studies (AES) 

240. Asian-American Legacy: A Social History of Community Adaptation. (3h) Introduction to the 
history, culture, and literature of the Asian- American communities, exploring issues of migra- 
tion, assimilation, and the process of developing Asian-American identities in the twentieth and 
early twenty-first centuries. Also listed as SOC 240. (CD) 

Chinese (CHI) 

101, 102. Elementary Chinese. (4h, 4h) Emphasis on the development of listening and speak- 
ing skiUs in Mandarin. Introduction to the writing system and to basic sentence patterns. Lab 
required. P — for CHI 102 is CHI 101 or equivalent. 

153. Intermediate Chinese I. (4h) Study in grammar, reading, conversation, and composition. 
Lab required. P — CHI 102 or equivalent. 

190. Reading and Writing Chinese. (3h) Teaches reading and writing skills in Chinese language 
at the beginning and intermediate levels. Designed to accompany concurrent courses taken 
abroad in conversational Chinese and to provide a rigorous framework for the study and 
memorization of Chinese characters. Not offered at the Wake Forest campus. May be repeated 
for credit with POI. 

1 96. Chinese Across the Curriculum. (Ih) Coursework in Chinese done as an adjunct to specially- 
designated courses throughout the college curriculum. P — POI. 

199. Individual Study. (l-3h) P— POI. 

201. Intermediate Chinese II. (4h) Further study in grammar, reading, conversation, and compo- 
sition. Lab required. P — CHI 153 or equivalent. 

220. Advanced Conversation. (3h) Concentration on advanced conversational and interactional 
skills using a body of reading materials and audiovisual materials as the basis for class discus- 
sion. P— CHI 201 or POI. 

230. Advanced Chinese I. (3h) Integration of speaking, reading, and writing skills with emphasis 
on written and audiovisual sources including newspapers, literature, and film. P — CHI 220 

or POI. 

231. Advanced Chinese II. (3h) Integration of speaking, reading, and writing skills with emphasis 
on written and audiovisual sources including newspapers, literature, and film. P — CHI 230 

or POI. 



Ill 



EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES AND CULTURES 



250. Introduction to Literature Written in Chinese. (4h) Readings in Chinese in prose and poetry. 
P— CHI 231 or POI. 

252. Recent Literature Written in Chinese. (3h) Readings in recent Taiwan and mainland Chinese 
literature. P— CHI 231 or POI. 

255. Business Hanyu. (3h) Communicating in Mandarin Chinese for business purposes. 
Addresses cultural differences in communication and spoken and written linguistic forms. 
P— CHI 201 or POI. 

350. Chinese Modern Literature Survey. (3h) Examines several key works of modem and con- 
temporary literature in Chinese. Fosters critical reading and interpretive skills and teaches the 
stylistics of writing analytical essays. P — CHI 250, 252, or POI. 

351 . Classical Chinese. (3h) Vocabulary and syntax of the written Chinese language prior to the 
twentieth century, including readings from the fourth century BC authors such as Mencius, 
along with writings from later centuries. P — CHI 250, 252 or POI. 

Communication (COM) 

351 A. Japanese and American Culture: Cross-Cultural Communication. (3h) Exploration of com- 
munication differences between the Japanese and the Americans. Japanese and American 
values, behavior, and beliefs are compared in determining effective methods for cross-cultural 
communication. Emphasis is on examining factors leading to miscommunication and the devel- 
opment of techniques for overcoming cultural barriers. Credit not given for both INS 349 and 
COM 351 A. Also listed as INS 349. (CD) 

Humanities (HMN) 

1 70. Understanding Japan. (3h) Understanding Japanese culture and behavior from the struc- 
ture of social units such as family, educational institutions, and sports, artistic, and professional 
organizations. Credit not given for both HMN 170 and 175. Also listed as EAL 170. (CD) 

1 75. Japanese Culture: Insight and Outreach. (3h) Develops an understanding of Japanese culture 
through reading, class discussion, and individual research, with subsequent outreach to area 
high schools through presentations. Credit not given for both HMN 170 and 175. Also listed as 
EAL 175. (CD) 

219. Introduction to Japanese Literature. (3h) Major works of poetry, drama, and fiction from the 
classical and modem periods. Also listed as EAL 219. 

221. Introduction to Chinese Literature. (3h) Readings and discussions in fiction, drama, and 
poetry from the traditional and modem periods. Also listed as EAL 221. 

251 . The Asian-American Experience: Literature and Personal Narratives. (3h) Introduction to the 
writings and narratives of Asian Americans of South and Southeast Asian descent, including 
Asian Americans of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Indian descent. Explores the process of 
assimilation, including the effects of immigration and cultural conflict on literary forms of 
expression, as well as the formation of new cultural identities. 

252. Introduction to Chinese Film. (3h) Introductory study of film from mainland China, Hong 
Kong, and Taiwan from its inception at the turn of the twentieth century to the present. Ex- 
plores Chinese film as an art form, an instrument of political propaganda, and a medium of 
popular entertainment. Also listed as EAL 252. 



EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES AND CULTURES ^12 



international Studies (INS) 

349. Japanese and American Culture: Cross-Cultural Communication. (3h) Exploration of com- 
munication differences between the Japanese and the Americans. Japanese and American 
values, behavior, and beliefs are compared in determining effective methods for cross-cultural 
communication. Emphasis is on examining factors leading to miscommunication and the devel- 
opment of techniques for overcoming cultural barriers. Credit not given for both INS 349 and 
COM 351A. Also listed as COM 351A. (CD) 

Japanese (JPN) 

101, 102. Elementary Japanese. (4h, 4h) Emphasis on the development of listening and speaking 
skills. Introduction to the writing systems. Basic sentence patterns covered. Lab required. P for 
JPN 102 is JPN 101 or equivalent. 

1 53. Intermediate Japanese I. (4h) Study in grammar, reading, conversation, and composition. 
Lab required. P — ^JPN 102 or equivalent. 

1 90. Reading and Writing Japanese. (3h) Teaches reading and writing skills in Japanese language 
at the beginning and intermediate levels. Designed to accompany concurrent courses taken 
abroad in conversational Japanese, and to provide a rigorous framework for the study and 
memorization of Japanese characters. Not offered at the Wake Forest campus. May be repeated 
for credit with POI. 

1 96. Japanese Across the Curriculum. (Ih) Coursework in Japanese done as an adjunct to specially- 
designated courses throughout the college curriculum. P — POI. 

199. Individual Study. (l-3h) P— POI. 

201. Intermediate Japanese II. (4h) Further study in grammar, reading, conversation, and com- 
position. Lab required. P — ^JPN 153 or equivalent. 

220. Advanced Conversation. (3h) Study of conversational and interactional skills using reading 
materials and audiovisual materials as basis for class discussion. P — ^JPN 201 or POI. 

230. Advanced Japanese I. (3h) Integration of speaking, reading, and writing skills with empha- 
sis on written and audiovisual sources including newspapers, literature, and film. P — ^JPN 220 
or POI. 

231 . Advanced Japanese II. (3h) Continuation of JPN 230, with emphasis on oral presentation 
and compositional skills. P— JPN 230 or POI. 

250. Introduction to Literature Written in Modern Japanese. (4h) Readings in Japanese in prose 
and poehy. P— JPN 231 or POI. 

251. Readings in Japanese Literature. (3h) Readings in Japanese literature, society, and culture 
from the nineteenth century to contemporary literature. P — ^JPN 231 or POI. 

350. Japanese Modern Literature Survey I. (3h) Examines several key works of modem and con- 
temporary literature in Japanese. Fosters critical reading and interpretive skills and teaches the 
stylistics of writing analytical essays. P — ^JPN 250, 251 or POI. 

351 . Japanese Modern Literature Survey II. (3h) Further analysis of key works of modem and 
contemporary literature in Japanese. Fosters critical reading and interpretive skills and teaches 
the stylistics of writing analytical essays. P — ^JPN 350 or POI. 



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Philosophy (PHI) 

350. The Main Streams of Chinese Philosophy and Religion. (3h). Also listed as REL 380. (See 
appropriate listings for descriptions and prerequisites of courses given in English.) 

Religion (REL) 

380. The Main Streams of Chinese Philosophy and Religion. (3h). Also listed as PHI 350. (See 
appropriate listings for descriptions and prerequisites of courses given in English.) 

East Asian Studies (EAS) 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 

Coordinator Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures David P. Phillips 

The minor in East Asian studies provides an opportunity for students to undertake a multi- 
disciplinary study of the art, history, philosophy, politics, religion, and culture of East Asia. 
It consists of a total of eighteen hours. Candidates for the minor are required to take at least 
one course from three of the four curriculum groupings noted. (See course descriptions imder 
appropriate course listings.) Nine or more of the hours towards the minor must focus on a 
geographical area — South Asia, Japan, China, or Southeast Asia. 

Appropriate credit in various fields of East Asian studies also may be obtained by study 
abroad in programs approved by the coordinator. Interested students are encouraged, prefer- 
ably in their sophomore year, to consult with the coordinator or an affiliated adviser to discuss 
their interests and structure a coherent course of study. 

Courses may be chosen from among the list of approved courses. Additional elective courses 
may have been approved since publication of this bulletin. The program coordinator main- 
tains a complete list of all approved elective courses. For course descriptions, see the relevant 
department's listings in this bulletin. 

311. Special Topics in East Asian Studies. (l-3h) Intensive survey of one or more important issues 
in East Asian studies not included in the regular course offerings. P — POL 

381. Independent Research in East Asian Studies. (l-3h) Supervised independent research project 
on a topic related to East Asia. P — Permission of both instructor and coordinator of East Asian 
Studies. May be repeated for credit. 

East Asian Studies Electives Group One: Humanities 

HMN 170. Understanding Japan. (3h) 

175. Japanese Culture: Insight and Outreach. (3h) 
219. Introduction to Japanese Literature. (3h) 
221. Introduction to Chinese Literature. (3h) 

251. The Asian- American Experience: Literature and Personal Narratives. (3h) 

252. Introduction to Chinese Film. (3h) 

East Asian Studies Electives Group Two: Art, Philosophy, and Religion 

ART 104. Topics in World Art (when focus is Asia). (3h) 
PHI 350. The Main Streams of Chinese Philosophy and Religion. (3h) 

EAST ASIAN STUDIES ^14 



REL 361. The Buddhist World of Thought and Practice. (3h) 
363. The Religions of Japan. (3h) 

380. The Main Streams of Chinese Philosophy and Religion. (3h) 

381. Zen Buddhism. (3h) 

382. Religion and Culture in China. (3h) 

East Asian Studies Electives Group Three: Social Sciences 

AES 240. Asian- American Legacy: A Social History of Community 
Adaptation. (3h) 
COM 351. Comparative Communication, (when topic is appropriate) (1.5h, 3h) 
INS 349. Japanese and American Culture: Cross-Cultural Communication (3h) 
POL 248. Chinese Politics. (3h) 
260. U.S. and East Asia. (3h) 

East Asian Studies Electives Group Four: History 

HST 244. Imperial China. (3h) 

245. Modem China. (3h) 

246. Japan before 1800. (3h) 

247. Japan since 1800. (3h) 

249. Introduction to East Asia. (3h) 
347. Japan since World War II. (3h) 

Economics (ECN) 

Chair Robert M. Whaples 

Archie Carroll Professor of Ethical Leadership John C. Moorhouse 

Hultquist Family Professor of Economics J. Daniel Hammond 

Reynolds Professor John H. Wood 

Professors Allin F. Cottrell, Donald E. Frey, Claire H. Hammond, Michael S. Lawlor, 

Perry L. Patterson, Robert M. Whaples 

Zachary T. Smith Associate Professor Sylvain H. Boko 

^ Associate Professors Frederick H. Chen, Jac C. Heckelman 

Visiting Instructors John MacDonald, Blair C. Mongado, Juiianne Treme 

The objectives of the economics program are to help prepare students for effective participation 
in the decision-making processes of society, to develop analytical skills in solving economic 
problems, to promote a better understanding of alternative economic systems, and to provide 
a balanced curriculum to prepare students for graduate study or positions in industry and 
government. Any (3h) economics course will satisfy a divisional requirement. 

The major in economics consists of twenty-seven hours in economics, including Economics 150, 
201, 205, 206, 207, and at least one course from ECN 211, 222, 252 or 274. A minimum grade of C 
is required in ECN 150 and 201, and a minimum of C- in ECN 205 and 207; in addition, students 
must achieve an overall 2.0 average in economics courses. The student also must make a mini- 
mum grade of C- in MTH 111 and MTH 109 (or similar course with permission of department 
chair). Students who receive a grade below C- in ECN 150 may not major in economics. 



115 



ECONOMICS 



Economics majors are encouraged to take complementary courses in mathematics, the 
humanities, or other social sciences to sharpen their analytical skills and to acquire a broader 
understanding of important issues. The faculty adviser will assist each student in determining 
the particular combination of courses that satisfies his or her needs. 

The minor in economics consists of eighteen hours, including ECN 150, 205, and 207. The math- 
ematics and minimum grade requirements for the minor are the same as for the major. 

Honors. Students may graduate with "Honors in Economics" if they have a grade point average 
of at least 3.0 and 3.3 in economics, and earn a minimum grade of B- in the research course, 
ECN 298. It is recommended that ECN 297 be taken as preparation for 298. 

Bachelor of Science in Mathematical Economics. The Department of Economics and the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics offer a major leading to a bachelor of science degree in mathematical 
economics. This interdisciplinary program affords the student an opportunity to apply math- 
ematical methods to the development of economic theory, models, and quantitative analysis. 
The major consists of the following course requirements: ECN 150, 205, 207, 210, 211, 215, 218; 
MTH 112, 113, 121, 254, 255; and three additional (3h) courses chosen with the approval of the 
program advisers. Students electing the major must receive permission from both the Depart- 
ment of Economics and the Department of Mathematics. A minimum grade average of C in all 
courses attempted for the mathematical economics major is required for graduation. 

Highly qualified mathematical economics majors are encouraged to apply for admission 
to the honors program in the major. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Math- 
ematical Economics," a student must satisfy the requirements of ECN 298 or MTH 381 by 
successfully completing a senior research project. Consult the program advisers for additional 
informahon. 

1 50. Introduction to Economics. (3h) Survey of micro and macroeconomic principles. Introduc- 
tion to basic concepts, characteristic data and trends, and some analytic techniques. Preference 
in enrollment is given to students with sophomore or upperclass standing. (D) 

201. Economic Data Analysis. (1.5h) Computer-oriented introduction to the gathering, presenta- 
tion, arid analysis of economic data. P — ECN 150. 

205. Intermediate Microeconomics I. (3h) Development of demand and supply analysis, neoclas- 
sical theory of household and firm behavior, and alternative market structures. P — ECN 150. (D) 

206. Intermediate Microeconomics II. (3h) More advanced theory of maximizing behavior of eco- 
nomic agents with discussion of risk, uncertainty, and economic dynamics. Theory employed in 
assessment of policy issues. P — ECN 205. (D) 

207. Intermediate Macroeconomics. (3h) Development of macroeconomic concepts of national 
income, circular flow, iacome determination, IS-LM analysis, and Phillips curves. Emphasizes 
contributions of Keynes and the Keynesian tradition. P — ECN 150. (D) 

210. Microeconomic Models. (1.5h) Development of formal models of consumer behavior, choice 
under risk, the firm, and demand and supply Static and dynamic properties of the models are 
explored. P— ECN 205 and MTH 111. 

211. Macroeconomic Models. (1.5h) Development of formal Keynesian, post-Keynesian, 
monetarist, and new classical macro models. Static and dynamic properties of the models are 
explored. P— ECN 207 and MTH 111. 

ECONOMICS 11^ 



215. Introduction to Econometrics. (3h) Economic analysis through quantitative methods, with 
emphasis on model construction and empirical research. P — ECN 150 and MTH 256. (D) 

216. Game Theory. (3h) Introduction to mathematical models of social and strategic interactions. 
P— ECN 205 and MTH 109 or 113. (D) 

218. Seminar in Mathematical Economics. (3h) Calculus and matrix methods used to develop 
basic tools of economic analysis. P— ECN 205, 207 and MTH 111, 112. (D) 

221. Public Finance. (3h) Examination of the economic behavior of government. Includes prin- 
ciples of taxation, spending, borrowing, and debt management. P — ECN 205. (D) 

222. Monetary Theory and Policy. (3h) Investigation of the nature of money, the macroeconomic 
significance of money, financial markets, and monetary policy. P— ECN 207. (D) 

223. Financial Markets. (3h) Study of the functions, structure, and performance of financial mar- 
kets. P— ECN 205 and 207. (D) 

224. Law and Economics. (3h) Economic analysis of property, contracts, torts, criminal behavior, 
due process, and law enforcement. P — ECN 205. (D) 

225. Public Choice. (3h) Traditional tools of economic analysis are employed to explore such 
topics in political science as political organization, elections, coalition formation, the optimal 
provision of public goods, and the scope of government. P — ECN 205. (D) 

231 . Economics of Industry. (3h) Analysis of the link between market structure and market per- 
formance in U.S. industries from theoretical and empirical viewpoints. Examines the efficiency 
of mergers, cartels, and other firm behaviors. Case studies may include automobiles, steel, 
agriculture, computers, sports, and telecommunications. P — ECN 205. (D) 

232. Antitrust Economics. (1.5h, 3h) Analysis of the logic and effectiveness of public policies 
designed to promote competition in the U.S. P — ECN 150 and 205. (D) 

235. Labor Economics. (3h) A theoretical and empirical survey of labor markets. Topics include: 
the demand and supply of labor, compensating wage differentials, education and training, 
discrimination, unions, public sector employment, earrvings inequality, and unemployment. 
P— ECN 205. (D) 

240. Economics of Health and Medicine. (3h) Applications of the methods of economic analysis to 
the study of the health care industiy. P— or C— ECN 205 and (choose one): ANT 380, BIO 380, 
BUS 201, ECN 215, HES 262, MTH 256, MTH 358, or SOC 371. (D) 

241. Natural Resource Economics. (3h) Develops the economic theory of natural resource mar- 
kets and explores public policy issues in natural resources and the environment. P — ECN 150. 
(D) 

246. Urban Economics. (3h) Theoretical and empirical study of the city as an economic entity, 
with attention to land-use patterns and prices, urban decay and redevelopment, suburbaniza- 
tion, housing, and city finance. P — ECN 150. (D) 

251 . International Trade. (3h) Development of the theory of international trade patterns and 
prices and the effects of trade restiictions such as tariffs and quotas. P — ECN 205. (D) 

252. International Finance. (3h) Study of foreign exchange and Eurocurrency markets, balance of 
payments, and macroeconomic policy in open economies. P — ECN 205 and 207. (D) 



117 



ECONOMICS 



253. Economies in Transition. (3h) Theoretical and institutional examination of historically 
socialist nations and the dilemmas of transition. Special reference to the former Soviet Union. 
P— ECN 150. (D) 

254. Current Issues in African Development. (3h) Theoretical and practical study of the main eco- 
nomic, political and institutional dilemmas faced by African countries in the course of economic 
development. Taught in Benin, West Africa, in summer. P — POL (CD, D) 

258. Economic Growth and Development. (3h) Study of the problems of economic growth, with 
particular attention to the less developed countries of the world. P — ECN 205 or POL (D) 

261. American Economic Development. (3h) Application of economic theory to historical prob- 
lems and issues in the American economy P — ECN 150. (D) 

262. History of Economic Thought. (3h) Historical survey of the main developments in economic 
thought from the Biblical period to the twentieth century. P — ECN 205 and 207. (D) 

265. Economic Philosophers. (1.5h, 3h) In-depth study of the doctrines and influence of up to 
three major figures in economics, such as Smith, Marx, and Keynes. P — ECN 205 and 207. (D) 

268. Morals and Markets. (3h) Historical survey of individualistic ethical values that have 
accompanied the development of market economics in the West. Considers critiques of, and 
alternatives to, these values. P — ECN 150. (D) 

270. Current Economic Issues. (1.5h, 3h) Examines current economic issues using economic the- 
ory and empirical evidence. Topics may include recent macroeconomic trends, the distribution 
of income, minimum wages, immigration. Social Security, war, global climate change, trade, 
regulation and deregulation, antitrust policy, health care, labor unions, tax reform, educational 
reform, and others. P— ECN 150. (D) 

271. Selected Areas in Economics. (Ih, 1.5h, 3h) Survey of an important area in economics not 
included in the regular course offerings. The economics of housing, education, or technology 
are examples. Students should consult the instructor to ascertain topic before enrolling. 

P— ECN 150. (D) 

272. Selected Areas in Economics. (Ih, 1.5h, 3h) Survey of an important area in economics not 
included in the regular course offerings. The economics of housing, education or technology are 
examples. Students should consult the instructor to ascertain topic before enrolling. P — ECN 
205 and 207. (D) 

273. Economics for a Multicultural Future. (3h) Examines the challenges and promise of the 
increasingly diverse U.S. economy. P — ECN 150. (CD, D) 

274. Topics in Macroeconomics. (3h) Considers significant issues and debates in macroeconomic 
theory and policy Examples might include a New Classical-New Keynesian debate, the East 
Asian currency crisis of 1997-1998, conversion of federal deficit to surplus, competing models of 
economic growth, alternative monetary, and fiscal policy targets. P— ECN 207. (D) 

290. Individual Study. (1.5h, 3h) Directed readings in a specialized area of economics. P — POL 

297. Preparing for Economic Research. (1.5h) Designed to assist students in selecting a research 
topic and beginning the study of the selected topic. P — POL 

298. Economic Research. (3h) Development and presentation of a senior research project. Re- 
quired of candidates for departmental honors. P — POD. (D) 



ECONOMICS 



118 



Education (EDU) 

Chair Mary Lynn Redmond 

Francis P. Gaines Professor Patricia M. Cunningham 

Professor Emeritus John H. Litcher 

Professors Robert H. Evans, Joseph O. Milner, Linda N. Nielsen 

Associate Professors R. Scott Baker, Ann Cunningham, Leah P. McCoy, Mary Lynn B. Redmond 

Assistant Professor Raymond Jones 

Visiting Assistant Professor Kristin Redington Bennett 

Adjunct Assistant Professors Alan Cameron, Patricia Fisk-Moody, Rebecca Shore 

Instructor Tracy Wilson 

Wake Forest University believes that the teaching profession is important to society and that 
its welfare is significantly affected by the quality of educational leadership. One of the impor- 
tant objectives of the University has been and continues to be the preparation of teachers. The 
University's commitment to quality in teacher education is demonstrated by selective admis- 
sion to the program, a wide range of professional courses, and closely supervised internships 
appropriate to the professional development of students. The Wake Forest education programs 
are fully accredited by NCATE (National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education) and 
by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. 

Prospective elementary and secondary social studies teachers earn a license by completing 
courses in many departments to earn a major in education. Prospective secondary teachers of 
English, mathematics, science, and prospective K-12 teachers of foreign languages major in that 
discipline and minor in education. A minor in secondary social studies education is also avail- 
able. In addition to the professional program, the department provides elective courses open to 
all students. 

Teacher Licensure. The state of North Carolina issues the Standard Professional I Class A Teach- 
er's License to graduates who have completed an approved program including the specified 
courses in their teaching fields and the prescribed courses in education, who have demonstra- 
ted specific competencies, and who receive recommendations from the designated officials in 
their teaching areas and from the licensure officer. 

Students who have graduated from an institution of higher education but have not complet- 
ed an approved licensure program may seek admission to the department in order to complete 
the Class A License. 

Students who wish to prepare for teaching at the secondary level but are unable to devote a 
semester to student teaching can earn a non-licensure minor. 

Admission Requirements. Admission involves filing an official application with the depart- 
ment's licensure officer, being interviewed, and being officially approved by the department. In 
addition, the state of North Carolina requires Teacher Education Program applicants to submit 
SAT scores (verbal and math) of 1100 or an ACT composite score of 24 to meet the minimum 
score requirements for Praxis I before being formally admitted. 

All students are required to have a 2.5 or better grade point average before being formally 
accepted in the Teacher Education Program. Formal acceptance into the program should take 
place by August 15 following the junior year for secondary students and by January 1 of the 
jvmior year for elementary students. 



119 



EDUCATION 



Program Area Goals. The goals and objectives for each licensure area are available in the office of 
the Department of Education. 

Course Requirements. The approved program of teacher education requires candidates to 
complete successfully a series of professional education courses. The exact sequence of 
professional and academic courses varies with a student's particular program and is deter- 
mined by the adviser in conference with the candidate. For those seeking secondary licensure, 
the majority of the professional work is taken during one semester of the senior year. Candi- 
dates for the elementary license typically begin coursework required for licensure during the 
sophomore year. 

Student Teaching. Prerequisites for registering for student teaching include (1) senior, graduate, 
or special student classification; (2) completion of Methods and Materials, Educational Technol- 
ogy, Educational Psychology, and the Foundations of Education courses; and (3) formal admis- 
sion to the Teacher Education Program. 

Students are assigned to student-teaching opportunities by public school officials on the 
basis of available positions and the professional needs of the student and the public school 
system. One semester of the senior year is reserved for the student-teaching experience. Stu- 
dents may not take covirses outside the education department during this semester without the 
approval of the department chair. 

Exit Requirements. Students must maintain at least a 2.5 grade point average while enrolled in 
the Teacher Education Program. The state of North Carolina requires candidates for profession- 
al licensure in elementary education to successfully complete the appropriate Praxis II Subject 
Assessment Exam(s). 

Teaching Area Requirements: Secondary Licensure 

Junior Year: EDU 201, 202, and 311 

Senior Year: EDU 307, 354, 364, 381, 383, and 385 

English. Thirty hours, including ENG 287, 323, and 390 or its equivalent. A course in world 
literature is also required. 

French. A minimum of twenty-seven hours of French courses numbered above FRH 212 or 213. 
FRH 216, 315, 319, 320, 322, 370, one of the genre courses (363, 364, or 365), and two other 
courses are required 

Spanish. Licensure in K-12 in Spanish: A minimum of twenty-seven hours of Spanish courses 
numbered above SPN 213: 316, 317, 318, 319 or 319L, 322, plus three advanced courses in 
literature of which one must be in Spanish literature and one in Spanish- American literature 
are required. 

German. Licensure in K-12 in German: A minimum of nine courses beyond GER 153 to include 
one course from the sequence 210, 212, or 2147 (Vienna); 317, 320 or 321, 399; at least one 
course from the sequence 349, 381, 383, 385. 

Mathematics. Thirty-two hours, including MTH 112, 113, 121, 321, 331, 357, (211 or 311), and 
three other courses beyond 113. 

Science. Licensure in the individual fields of science: biology (thirty-four hours), chemistry 
(twenty-eight hours for BA), and physics (twenty-five hours). All courses must be from the 
same courses required for majors in those fields. 



EDUCATION 



120 



Social Studies. Thirty hours, including eighteen hours in history and twelve hours from four 
other social sciences. History hours include six hours from European or world history, six 
hours from U.S. history, and six hours from nonwestern history. The twelve additional hours 
come from one course each in economics, geography, political science, and anthropology or 
sociology. 

Education courses required for a secondary license include EDU 201, 202, 307, 311, 354, 364, 381, 
383, and 385. 

Teaching Requirements: Elementary Licensure 

A major in elementary education requires thirty-nine hours including EDU 201, 202, 203, 221, 
222, 250, 293, 294, 295, 296, 298, 307, 311, 312, and 382. In addition to or as part of lower division 
requirements, all education majors must take at least one course in mathematics and PSY 151. 

Sophomore or Junior Year: EDU 201, 202, and 311 
Junior Year: EDU 203, 221, 295, 298, 307, and 382 
Senior Year: EDU 222, 250, 293, 294, 296, and 312 

Education Minors. The minor in professional education requires EDU 201, 202, 307, 311, 354, 
364, 381, 383, and 385 and is awarded only to students who complete student teaching. The 
non-licensure minor does not include EDU 381, 383, 385, and student teaching (EDU 364) and 
requires a major in one of the secondary license areas. 

131. Adolescent Literature. (2h) Study of recent fiction centering on the lives of adolescents. 
Attention is given to interpretation of literature ranging from the reader response approach to 
critical pluralism. By placement only. 

201. Foundations of Education. (3h) Philosophical, historical, and sociological foundations of 
education, including analysis of contemporary issues and problems. (CD) 

202. Field Experience One. (2h) Practical experiences in classrooms. Weekly public school experi- 
ence and seminar. Pass /Fail only. 

203. Field Experience Two. (2h) Teaching experiences in classrooms in a diverse school environ- 
ment. Weekly school participation and seminar. Pass /Fail only. P — EDU 201 and 202 and POI. 

221. Children's Literature. (2h) Survey of the types and uses of literature appropriate for elemen- 
tary grades, including multicultural literature. 

222. Integrating the Arts and Movement into the Elementary Curriculum. (2h) Survey of the 
materials, methods, and techniques of integrating the arts and physical development into the 
elementary curriculum. P — POL 

223. Theatre in Education. (3h) Practical experience for theatre and education students to work 
together with children in the classroom using theatre to teach core curriculum. Emphasis on 
methods and techniques as well as the development and implementation of creative lesson 
plans. Weekly public school teaching experience and seminar. Also listed as THE 270. 

231 . Adolescent Literature. (3h) A study of recent fiction centering on the lives of adolescents. 
Attention is given to interpretation of literature ranging from the reader response approach to 
critical pluralism. 



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EDUCATION 



250. Student Teaching: Elementary. (6h) Supervised teaching experience in grades K-6. Pass/ 
Fail. P— POL 

271. Geography: The Human Environment. (3h) Survey of the geography of human activity as it 
occurs throughout the world. Emphasis is on current problems related to population, resources, 
regional development, and urbanization. Credit not allowed for both EDU 271 and 274. 

272. Geography Study Tour. (3h) A guided tour of selected areas to study physical, economic, 
and cultural environments and their influence on man. Background references for reading are 
suggested prior to the tour. Offered in the summer. (CD) 

273. Geography: The Natural Environment. (3h) Systematic study of the major components of 
physical geography with special emphasis on climate and topography. 

274. Environmental Geography. (3h) A systematic study of major environmental issues on a 
global scale with an exploration of implications and possible solutions. Credit not allowed for 
both EDU 274 and 271. 

281. Public Life and the Liberal Arts. (3h) Devoted to topics of abiding significance. Fundamental 
dilemmas and resolutions associated with each topic are examined through a consideration of 
their treatment in the liberal arts tradition. Politics and the Arts, and Theory and Practice in 
Public Life are representative topics. 

293. Elementary School Curriculum. (3h) General principles of curriculum and teaching methods, 
including adaptations for exceptional learners of all types and integration among all curriculum 
areas. P— POL 

294. Teaching Elementary Language Arts. (3h) Methods and materials for teaching language arts, 
including adaptations for diverse and exceptional learners. P — POL 

295. Teaching Elementary Social Studies in a Pluralistic Society. (3h) Methods and materials for 
teaching social studies, including adaptations for diverse and exceptional learners. P — POL 

296. Teaching Elementary Mathematics. (3h) Methods and materials for teaching mathematics, 
including adaptations for diverse and exceptional learners. P — POL 

297. Trends and Issues in American Schools. (Ih) Exploration of contemporary trends and issues 
as they affect course content and teaching methods in the schools. Intended to help those not 
entering professional education evaluate their schools as informed citizens and decision-makers. 

298. Teaching Elementary Science. (3h) Methods and materials for teaching science, including 
adaptations for diverse and exceptional learners. P — POL 

303. History of Western Education. (3h) Educational theory and practice from ancient times 
through the modem period, including American education. 

304. Theories of Education. (3h) Contemporary proposals for educational theory and practice 
studied in the context of social issues. 

305. The Sociology of Education. (3h) Study of contemporary educational institutions. Examines 
such issues as school desegregation, schooling and social mobility, gender equity, and multi- 
culturalism. 



EDUCATION 122 



307. Technology in Education. (3h) Introduction to the use of computers in education. Includes 
use of the Internet, software, and hardware, including multimedia, to meet instructional goals. 
P— EDU201and311. 

308. School and Society. (3h) Study of continuity and change in educaHonal institutions, includ- 
ing analysis of teachers, students, curriculum, evaluation, contemporary problems, and reform 
movements. P — EDU 201 or introductory course in history or social science. 

310. Race, Class, and Gender in a Color-blind Society. (3h) Examination of issues surrounding 
race, class, and gender in the U.S. Topics include income and wealth, theories of discrimination, 
public education, gender bias, and patterns of occupational and industrial segregation. Also 
listed as AES 310. 

31 1. Educational Psychology. (3h) The theories, processes, and conditions of effective teaching/ 
learning. Includes twenty -hour field experience in a diverse setting if student does not take 
EDU 203. 

31 2. Teaching Children with Special Needs. (3h) Survey of the various types of learning problems 
commonly found in elementary children. Students observe exemplary programs, tutor children 
with special needs, and attend seminars on effective instructional techniques. P — EDU 250. 

313. Human Growth and Development. (3h) Study of the intellectual, emotional, and physical 
components of growth from birth to adolescence, with special concern for the educational 
implications of this process. 

337.TESOL Linguistics. (3h) An introduction to the theoretical and practical linguistics resources 
and skills for teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) within the U.S. or 
abroad. Also listed as LIN 337. P— LIN/ANT 150 or ENG 304; knowledge of a second language 
is recommended. 

351. Adolescent Psychology. (3h) Introduction to theories of adolescent psychology as related to 
teaching and counseling in various settings. Readings emphasize researchers' suggestions for 
parenting, teaching, and counseling adolescents between the ages of thirteen and nineteen. 

354. Methods and Materials. (3h) Methods, materials, and techniques used in teaching particular 
secondary subjects (English, mathematics, science, second languages, social studies). Includes 
forty-hour field experience component. P — EDU 201. 

358. Studies in Contemporary Leadership. (3h) Examination of contemporary leadership theory 
and its various applications in society. Students engage in practical leadership exercises, read 
on a variety of leadership topics, and develop their own philosophy of leadership. A twenty- 
five contact hour internship is required. 

364. Secondary Student Teaching. (9h) Supervised teaching experience in grades 9-12 (K-12 for 
foreign language). Full-time, fifteen-week field experience. P — POI. 

374. Student Teaching Seminar. (1.5h) Analysis and discussion of problems and issues in the 
teaching of particular secondary subjects (English, mathematics, science, second languages, 
social studies). Emphasis on the application of effective instructional methods and materials. 

381. Special Needs Seminar. (Ih) Analysis and discussion of practical problems and issues in the 
teaching of special needs students in the secondary classroom. Topics include reading and writ- 
ing in the content area, inclusion, and evaluation. Pass /Fail only. 



123 



EDUCATION 



382. Teaching Elementary Reading. (3h) Methods and materials for teaching reading, including 
adaptations for diverse and exceptional learners. P — POL 

383. Classroom Management Seminar. (Ih) Examination of research- and practice-based strate- 
gies for secondary school classroom management and discipline. Pass /Fail only. 

385. Diversity Seminar. (Ih) Exploration of multicultural issues and relevant Spanish language 
and cultural teaching practices for classroom communication. Pass/Fail only. 

387. Tutoring Writing. (1.5h) Introduction to composition theory and rhetoric with a special em- 
phasis on one-to-one tutoring techniques. Students analyze their own writing process and ex- 
periences, study modern composition theory, and practice tutoring techniques in keeping with 
these theories. Strongly recommended for those interested in working in the Writing Center as 
peer tutors. A student may not receive credit for both EDU 387 and ENG 287. 

390. Methods and Materials for Teaching Foreign Languages (K-6). (3h) Survey of the basic ma- 
terials, methods, and techniques of teaching foreign languages in the elementary and middle 
grades. Emphasis is on issues and problems involved in planning and implementing effective 
second language programs in grades K-6. 

391 . Teaching the Gifted. (3h) Investigation of theory and practice pertinent to teachers of the 
gifted. 

392. The Psychology of the Gifted Child. (3h) Discussion of giftedness and creativity in children 
and the relationship of those characteristics to adult superior performance. Topics to be covered 
include a history of the study of precocity, methods and problems of identification, the relation- 
ship of giftedness and creativity, personality characteristics and social-emotional problems of 
gifted children, and the social implications of studying giftedness. 

393. Individual Study. (Ih, 3h) A project in an area of study not otherwise available. Permitted 
upon departmental approval of petition presented by a qualified student. 

394. Internship in Education of the Gifted. (3h) Intensive period of observation and instruction 
of gifted students. Readings and directed reflection upon the classroom experience are used to 
develop a richer understanding of such a special school setting. 

395. Teaching Exceptional Students. (2h) Introduction to understanding exceptional students 
and effective teaching strategies for their inclusion in the regular classroom. 

396. Education in Business and Industry. (3h) Educational concepts applied to programs in edu- 
cation and training in business /industrial settings. 



EDUCATION 124 



English (ENG) 

Chair Eric G.Wilson 

Associate Chair William M. Moss 

Director of English Core Curriculum Anne M. Boyle 

Associate Director of English Core Curriculum Thomas W. McGohey 

Charles E. Taylor Professor of English James S. Hans 

W.R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Humanities Allen Mandelbaum 

Reynolds Professor of English Herman Rapaport 

Thomas H. Pritchard Professor of English Eric G. Wilson 

Professors Anne M. Boyle, Mary K. DeShazer, Andrew V. Ettin, Claudia Thomas Kairoff, 

Philip F. Kuberski, Barry G. Maine, William M. Moss, Gillian R. Overing, Gale Sigal 

McCulloch Family Fellow and Associate Professor Jefferson M. Holdridge 

Ollen R. Nalley Associate Professor John R. McNally 

Associate Professors Scott W. Klein, Olga Valbuena-Hanson 

Associate Professor of Journalism Wayne E. King 

Assistant Professors Elizabeth S. Anker, Dean J. Franco, Miriam E. Jacobson, Jessica A. Richard 

Senior Lecturer Thomas W. McGohey 

Lecturers in Journalism Justin J. Catanoso, Michael L. Horn 

Visiting Assistant Professors Bonnie Carr, David A. Davis, Elizabeth F. Evans, Devon R. Fisher, 

Bryan A. Giemza, Colleen C. O'Brien, Jason E. Powell, KerstiT. Powell, Chad W.Trevitte 

Visiting Instructors Rian E. Bowie, Sally Connolly, Jonathan R. Daigle, Phillip J. Kowalski, 

Susan M. Miller, Charles L. Sligh 

Visiting Poets-in-Residence Vona Groarke, Conor O'Callaghan 

Visiting Instructor in Journalism Mary Martin Niepold 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Elizabeth A. Way 

Adjunct Instructor Omaar Hena 

The major in English requires a minimum of thirty hours, at least twenty-four hours of which 
must be in advanced language and literature courses numbered 300 to 399. The remaining six 
hours may consist of ENG 150, 165, 175, 185, 190 or of one of those plus an additional 300-level 
language and literature course. Either 150, 165, 175, 185 or 190 must be taken as a prerequisite 
for any 300-level course. ENG 111, the basic writing requirement, cannot be counted for credit 
toward the major or minor in English; likewise, it cannot be counted as a substitute for the liter- 
ature divisional requirement. No 200-level courses can count toward the major without special 
permission of the department. The advanced courses for the major must include Shakespeare, 
two additional courses in British literature before 1800 (6 hours), one course in American litera- 
ture, and a major seminar, ENG 300, which must be taken no later than the spring semester of 
the junior year. All English majors, except late declarees, must pre-register in the spring of their 
sophomore year for the major seminar. No more than two advanced writing courses (383, 398, 
and 399) may be counted toward the major. Majors and their advisers plan individual programs 
to meet these requirements and to include work in the major literary genres. No more than two 
courses (6h) taken elsewhere may be counted toward the twenty-four hours of 300-level English 
courses required for the major, with individual petitions to be made for possible exceptions. 
This limitation applies to courses taught in approved non-Wake Forest programs, not to courses 
in programs offered or sponsored by Wake Forest. 



125 



A minor in English requires ENG 150, 165, 175, 185, or 190 plus fifteen hours in advanced lang- 
uage and literature courses. Each minor will be assigned an adviser in the EngUsh depart- 
ment who will plan a program of study with the student. No more than one course (3h) taken 
elsewhere may be counted toward the fifteen hours of 300-level English courses required for the 
minor, with individual petitions to be made for possible exceptions. This limitation applies to 
courses taught in approved non-Wake Forest programs, not to courses in programs offered or 
sponsored by Wake Forest. 

A minimum grade-point average of 2.0 in courses which comprise a major or minor in the 
department is required for graduation with any major or minor this department offers. 

Honors. Highly qualified majors recommended by the English faculty are invited to apply to the 
honors program in English during the second semester of their junior year. To graduate with 
"Honors in English," students must have a minimum grade point average of 3.5 in the major 
and 3.2 in all course work and must satisfy the requirements of the program by completing 
ENG 388 during their senior year. Interested students may consult the director of the English 
honors program for further information. 

Additional courses in journalism and writing are offered by the department as related subjects 
but do not count toward an English major or minor; they may be taken as electives regardless of 
the field of study in which a student majors. 

English 111, an AP score of 4 or 5, an LB., higher level, score of 6 or 7, or exemption by the de- 
partment is a prerequisite for any English core course above 111. Students with a 5 on the 
AP literature or language examinations are allowed to take a 300-level course for their literature 
divisional requirement. For all other students, only ENG 150, 165, 175, 185, 190, and 224 can 
count as the divisional literature requirement. 

Core Courses 

105. Introduction to Critical Reading and Writing. (3h) Training in the fundamentals of written 
English and introduction to the activities basic to undergraduate study: critical reading and 
writing, interpretation, report, and discussion. Admission by placement only; does not satisfy 
the basic composition requirement. 

111. Writing Seminar. (4h) Training in expository writing; frequent essays based on readings in a 
selected topic. 

1 50. Literature Interprets the World. (3h) Introduction to ways literary artists shape experience, 
focusing on one topic or selected topics. P — ENG 111 or exemption from ENG 111. (D) 

160. Introduction to British Literature. (3h) Eight to ten writers representing different periods 
and genres. Not open to first year students. P — ENG 111 or exemption from ENG 111. (D) 

165. Studies in British Literature. (3h) Emphasis on important writers representing different pe- 
riods and genres; primarily discussion; writing intnsive. P — ENG 111 or exemption from ENG 
111. (D) 

170. Introduction to American Literature. (3h) Seven to ten writers representing different periods 
and genres. Not open to first year students. P — ENG 111 or exemption from ENG 111. (D) 

1 75. Studies in American Literature. (3h) Emphasis on important writers representing different 
periods; primarily discussion; writing intensive. P — ENG 111 or exemption from ENG 111. (D) 



ENGLISH J26 



185. Studies in Global Literature. (3h) Emphasis on important writers representing different 
periods and genres; primarily discussion; writing intensive. P — ENG 111 or exemption from 
ENG 111. (D) 

190. Literary Genres. (3h) Emphasis on poetry, fiction, or drama; primarily discussion, with 
frequent short papers. P — ENG 111 or exemption from ENG 111. (D) 

210. Advanced Composition. (3h) Study of prose models of exposition; frequent papers and indi- 
vidual conferences. Enrollment limited. P — Satisfaction of basic composition requirement. 

224. Exploring Shakespeare. (3h) Six to eight works by Shakespeare in different genres, studied 
through printed texts, films, and videos. Emphasis on developing abilities to understand and 
appreciate Shakespeare's works in performance through attention to language and stagecraft. 
Does not count toward the major or minor in English. P — ENG 111 or exemption from ENG 111. 
(D) 

299. Individual Study. (1.5h-3h) Independent study with faculty guidance. By prearrangement. 

Journalism Courses 

See section on Journalism. 

Writing Courses 

285. Poetry Workshop. (1.5h, 3h) Laboratory course in the writing of verse. Study of poetic tech- 
niques and forms as well as works of contemporary poets. Frequent individual conferences. 

286. Short Story Workshop. (1.5h, 3h) Study of the fundamental principles of short fiction writ- 
ing; practice in writing; extensive study of short story form. 

287. Tutoring Writing. (1.5h) Introduction to composition theory and rhetoric, with a special 
emphasis on one-to-one tutoring techniques. Students analyze their own writing process and 
experiences, study modern composition theory, and practice tutoring techniques in keeping 
with these theories. Strongly recommended for those interested in working in the Writing Cen- 
ter as peer tutors. A student may not receive credit for both EDU 387 and ENG 287. 

383. Theory and Practice of Poetry Writing. (1.5h, 3h) Emphasis on reading and discussing stu- 
dent poems in terms of craftsmanship and general principles. May be repeated once. 
P— ENG 285 or POI. 

398. Advanced Fiction Writing. (3h) Primarily a short-story workshop, with class discussion on 
issues of craft, revision, and selected published stories. May be repeated once. P — ENG 286 
or POI. ' 

399. Advanced Expository Writing. (3h) Training and practice in writing expository prose at a 
level appropriate for publication in various print media, primarily magazines. P — ENG 160, 
165, 170, or 175. Also listed as JOU 284. 

Advanced Language and Literature Courses 

300. Seminar in the Major. (3h) Selected topics in British and American literature. Intensive 
practice in critical discourse, including discussion, oral reports, and short essays. Introduction 
to literary scholarship and research methodology leading to a documented paper. Required for 
all majors. May be repeated once. 



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ENGLISH 



301 . Individual Authors. (1.5h, 3h) Study of selected work from an important American or British 
author. May be repeated. 

302. Ideas in Literature. (1.5h, 3h) Study of a significant literary theme in selected works. May be 
repeated. 

304. History of the English Language. (3h) Survey of the development of English s)nitax, mor- 
phology, and phonology from Old English to the present, with attention to vocabulary growth. 

305. Old English Language and Literature. (3h) Introduction to the Old English language and 
a study of the historical and cultural background of Old English literature, including Anglo- 
Saxon and Viking art, runes, and Scandinavian mythology. Readings from Beowulf and selected 
poems and prose. ''- 

307. Dante I. (1.5h) Study of the Divine Comedy as epic, prophecy, autobiography, and poetic 
innovation, relating it to antiquity, Christianity, Dante's European present (the birth of the mod- 
em languages and new intellectual and poetic forms), and Dante's own afterlife in the West. 
Also listed as HMN 361. 

308. Dante II. (1.5h) The completion of the course on the Divine Comedy as epic, prophecy, auto- 
biography, and poetic innovation, relating it to antiquity, Christianity, Dante's European present 
(the birth of the modem languages and new intellectual and poetic forms), and Dante's own 
afterlife in the West. Also listed as HMN 362. P— ENG 307 or HMN 361, or POL 

3 10. The Medieval World. (3h) Examines theological, philosophical, and cultural assumptions of 
the Middle Ages through the reading of primary texts. Topics may include Christian providen- 
tial history, drama, devotional literature, the Franciscan controversy, domestic life, and Arthu- 
rian romance. (CD — Depending on topic covered.) 

311. The Legend of Arthur. (3h) The origin and development of the Arthurian legend in France 
and England, with emphasis on the works of Chretien de Troyes and Sir Thomas Malory. 

312. Medieval Poetry. (3h) The origin and development of poetic genres and lyric forms of medi- 
eval vernacular poetry. 

315. Chaucer. (3h) Emphasis on The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, with some atten- 
tion to minor poems. Consideration of literary, social, religious, and philosophical background. 

319. Virgil and His English Legacy. (3h) A study of Virgil's Eclogues, Georgics, and selected pas- 
sages of the Aeneid, and their influence on English literature, using translations and original 
works by writers of the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries, including Spenser, Marlowe, 
Milton, Dryden, and Pope. Knowledge of Latin is not required. Also listed as CLA 259. 

320. British Drama to 1642. (3h) British drama from its beginning to 1642, exclusive of Shake- 
speare. Representative cycle plays, moralities, Elizabethan and Jacobean tragedies, comedies, 
and tragicomedies. Also listed as THE 320. 

323. Shakespeare. (3h) Thirteen representative plays illustrating Shakespeare's development as 
a poet and dramatist. Also listed as THE 323. 

325. Sixteenth-Century British Literature. (3h) Concentration on the poetry of Spenser, Sidney, 
Shakespeare, Wyatt, and Drayton, with particular attention to sonnets and The Faerie Queene. 

326. Studies in English Renaissance Literature. (3h) Selected topics in Renaissance literature. 
Consideration of texts and their cultural background. 

ENGLISH J28 



327. Milton. (3h) The poetry and selected prose of John Milton, with emphasis on Paradise Lost. 

328. Seventeenth-Century British Literature. (3h) Poetry of Donne, Herbert, Vaughan, Marvel, 
Crashaw; prose of Bacon, Burton, Browne, Walton. Consideration of religious, political, and 
scientific backgrounds. 

330. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature. (3h) Representative poetry and prose, 
exclusive of the novel, 1660-1800, drawn from Dryden, Behn, Swift, Pope, Johnson, and Woll- 
stonecraft. Consideration of cultural backgrounds and significant literary trends. 

335. Eighteenth-Century British Fiction. (3h) Primarily the fiction of Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, 
Smollett, Sterne, and Austen. 

336. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Drama. (3h) British drama from 1660 to 1780, 
including representative plays by Dryden, Etherege, Wycherley, Congreve, Goldsmith, and 
Sheridan. Also listed as THE 336. 

337. Studies in Eighteenth-Century British Literature. (3h) Selected topics in eighteenth-century 
literature. Consideration of texts and their cultural background. 

340. Studies in Women and Literature. (3h) a.) The woman writer in society, b.) Feminist critical 
approaches to literature. 

350. British Romantic Poets. (3h) A review of the beginnings of Romanticism in British literature, 
followed by study of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, and Shelley; collateral reading in 
the prose of the period. 

351. Studies in Romanticism. (3h) Selected topics in European and/or American Romanticism 
with a focus on comparative, interdisciplinary, and theoretical approaches to literature. 

353. Nineteenth-Century British Fiction. (3h) Representative major works by Dickens, Eliot, 
Thackeray, Hardy, the Brontes, and others. 

354. Victorian Poetry. (3h) A study of Tennyson, Browning, Hopkins, and Arnold or another 
Victorian poet. 

357. Studies in Chicano Literature. (3h) Writings by Americans of Mexican descent in relation to 
politics and history. Readings in literature, literary criticism, and socio-cultural analysis. Also 
listed as AES 357. (CD) 

358. Postcolonial Literature. (3h) A survey of representative examples of postcolonial literature 
from geographically diverse writers, emphasizing issues of politics, nationalism, gender and 
class. (CD) 

359. Studies in Postcolonial Literature. (3h) Examination of themes and issues in postcolonial 
literature, such as: globalization, postcolonialism and hybridity, feminism, nationalism, ethnic 
and religious conflict, the impact of the Cold War, and race and class. (CD) 

360. Studies in Victorian Literature. (3h) Selected topics, such as development of genres, major 
authors and texts, and cultural influences. Readings in poetry, fiction, autobiography, and other 
prose. 

361. Literature and Science. (3h) Literature of and about science. Topics vary and may include 
literature and medicine, the two culture debate, poetry and science, nature in literature, the 
body in literature. 



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ENGLISH 



362. Irish Literature in the Twentieth Century. (3h) Study of modem Irish literature from the 
writers of the Irish Literary Renaissance to contemporary writers. Consists of overviews of the 
period as well as specific considerations of genre and of individual writers. 

363. Studies in Modernism. (3h) Selected issues in Modernism. Interdisciplinary, comparative, 
and theoretical approaches to works and authors. 

364. Studies in Literary Criticism. (3h) Consideration of certain figures and schools of thought 
significant in the history of literary criticism. 

365. Twentieth-Century British Fiction. (3h) A study of Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce, Forster, Woolf, 
and later British writers, with attention to their social and intellectual backgrounds. 

366. James Joyce. (3h) The major works by James Joyce, with an emphasis on Ulysses. 

367. Twentieth-Century English Poetry. (3h) Study of twentieth-century poets of the English 
language, exclusive of the U.S. poets, are read in relation to the literary and social history of the 
period. 

368. Studies in Irish Literature. (3h) The development of Irish literature from the eighteenth 
century through the early twentieth century in historical perspective, with attention to issues 
of linguistic and national identity. 

369. Modern Drama. (3h) Main currents in modem drama from nineteenth-century realism and 
naturalism through symbolism and expressionism. After an introduction to European precur- 
sors, focus is on representative plays by Wilde, Shaw, Synge, Yeats, O'Neill, Eliot, Hellman, 
Wilder, Williams, Hansberry, and Miller. 

370. American Literature to 1820. (3h) Origins and development of American literature and 
thought in representative writings of the Colonial, Revolutionary, and Federal periods. 

371. American Ethnic Literature. (3h) Introduction to the field of American ethnic literature, with 
special emphasis on post World War II formations of ethnic culture: Asian American, Native 
American, African American, Latino, and Jewish American. Highlights issues, themes, and 
stylistic innovations particular to each ethnic group and examines currents in the still-develop- 
ing American culture. (CD) 

372. American Romanticism. (3h) Writers of the mid-nineteenth century, including Emerson, 
Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Melville. 

373. Literature and Film. (3h) Selected topics in the relationship between literature and film, such 
as film adaptations of literary works, the study of narrative, and the development of literary 
and cinematic genres. 

374. American Fiction before 1 865. (3h) Novels and short fiction by such writers as Brown, 
Cooper, Irving, Foe, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, and Davis. 

375. American Drama. (3h) Historical overview of drama in America, covering such play- 
wrights as Boucicault, O'Neill, Hellman, Wilder, Williams, Inge, Miller, Hansberry, Albee, 
Shepard, Norman, Mamet, and Wilson. Also listed as THE 375. 

376. American Poetry before 1900. (3h) Readings and critical analysis of American poetry from 
its beginnings to the end of the nineteenth century, including Bradstreet, Emerson, Longfellow, 
Melville, and Foe, with particular emphasis on Whitman and Dickinson. 



130 



377. American Jewish Literature. (3h) Survey of writings on Jewish topics or experiences by 
American Jewish writers. Explores cultural and generational conflicts, responses to social 
change, the impact of the Shoah (Holocaust) on American Jews, and the challenges of language 
and form posed by Jewish and non-Jewish artistic traditions. (CD) 

378. Literature of the American South. (3h) Study of Southern literature from its beginnings to 
the present. Emphasis on major writers such as Tate, Warren, Faulkner, O'Connor, Welty, and 
Styron. 

379. Literary Forms of the American Personal Narrative. (3h) Reading and critical analysis of 
autobiographical texts in which the ideas, style, and point of view of the writer are examined to 
demonstrate how these works contribute to an understanding of pluralism in American culture. 
Representative authors may include Hurston, Wright, Kingston, Angelou, Wideman, Sarton, 
Chuang Hua, Crews, and Dillard. 

380. American Fiction from 1865 to 1915. (3h) Study of such writers as Twain, James, Howells, 
Crane, Dreiser, Wharton, and Cather. 

381 . Studies in African-American Literature. (3h) Reading and critical analysis of selected fiction, 
poetry, drama, and other writings by American authors of African descent. (CD) 

382. Modern American Fiction, 1915 to 1965. (3h) Includes such writers as Stein, Lewis, Ander- 
son, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Dos Passos, Wolfe, Wright, Ellison, Agee, O'Connor, and 
Pynchon. 

383. Theory and Practice of Poetry Writing. (1.5h, 3h) Emphasis on reading and discussing stu- 
dent poems in terms of craftsmanship and general principles. May be repeated once. P — ENG 
285 or POL 

385. Twentieth-Century American Poetry. (3h) Readings of modern American poetry in relation 
to the literary and social history of the period. 

386. Directed Reading. (L5h-3h) Tutorial in an area of study not otherwise provided by the de- 
partment; granted upon departmental approval of petition presented by a qualified student. 

387. African-American Fiction. (3h) Selected topics in the development of fiction by American 
writers of African descent. Also listed as AES 387. (CD) 

388. Honors in English. (3h) Conference course centering upon a special reading requirement 
and a thesis requirement. For senior students wishing to graduate with "Honors in English." 

389. African-American Poetry. (3h) Readings of works by American poets of African descent in 
theoretical, critical, and historical contexts. Also listed as AES 389. (CD) 

390. The Structure of English. (3h) An introduction to the principles and techniques of modem 
linguistics applied to contemporary American English. 

391. Studies in Postmodernism. (3h) hiterdisciplinary, comparative, and theoretical approaches 
to works and authors. 

393. Multicultural American Drama. (3h) Examination of the dramatic works of playwrights 
from various racial and ethnic commimities such as Asian American, Native American, African 
American, and Latino, hicludes consideration of issues, themes, style, and form. Also listed as 
THE 376. (CD) 



131 



394. Contemporary Drama. (3h) Considers experiments in form and substance in plays from 
Godot to the present. Readings cover such playwrights as Beckett, Osborne, Pinter, Stoppard, 
Churchill, Wertenbaker, Albee, Shepard, Mamet, Wilson, Soyinka, and Fugard. Also listed as 
THE 372. 

395. Contemporary American Literature. (3h) Study of post-World War II American poetry and 
fiction by such writers as Bellow, Gass, Barth, Pynchon, Lowell, Ashbery, Ammons, Bishop, and 
Rich. 

396. Contemporary British Fiction. (3h) Study of the British novel and short story, with particular 
focus on the multicultural aspects of British life, including works by Rushdie, Amis, Winterson 
and Ishiguro. 

398. Advanced Fiction Writing. (3h) Primarily a short-story workshop, with class discussion on 
issues of craft, revision, and selected published stories. May be repeated once. P — ENG 286 or 
POL 

399. Advanced Expository Writing. (3h) Training and practice in writing expository prose at a 
level appropriate for publication in various print media, primarily magazines. P — ENG 160, 
165, 170, or 175. Also listed as JOU 284. 



Entrepreneurship and Social Enterprise (ESE) 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 
Director Elizabeth Gatewood 

The Wake Forest Program for Entrepreneurship and the Liberal Arts offers an interdisciplinary 
minor in entrepreneurship and social enterprise. Through this minor students are encouraged 
to take advantage of their knowledge, creative skills, and resources to identify and pursue 
opportunities, initiate change, and create value in their lives and the lives of others. A minor in 
entrepreneurship and social enterprise coupled with any major within the College or the 
Calloway School is designed to enable students to maximize their involvement in the local 
community and society. 

A total of eighteen hours is required for the minor: six hours of entry-level courses (ESE 
100, ESE 101 /BUS 113 or BUS 213 for business majors), three hours of internship or indepen- 
dent study credit (ESE 350, ESE 391), and nine hours selected from relevant courses across the 
curriculum as listed. No more than six of the elective hours may be counted from a student's 
major. Course plans will be made in consultation with the director of the minor. A student may 
fulfill six of their nine elective hours by taking the Calloway Summer Management Program 
(BUS 295). Business majors are strongly encouraged to take BUS 272 to meet the strategic man- 
agement requirement. 

Required Courses for Entrepreneurship and Social Enterprise 

100. Creativity and Innovation. (3h) Interactive seminar introduces students to writings from 
various disciplines that elucidate the nature and function of creativity and the conditions that 
stimulate it. Students engage in dynamic creative processes and projects in order to develop 
a critical creativity. Includes writing and design assignments and group projects. Discussions 



ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SOCIAL ENTERPRISE 



132 



include consciousness, receptivity, risk, ethics, personal mastery, and social responsiveness with 
the express objective of fostering creative potential in all aspects of work and life. 

1 01 . Foundations of Entrepreneurship. (3h) Addresses the challenges of creating and sustaining 
organizations in today's global environment. Provides an overview of the role and importance 
of entrepreneurship in the global economy and in society. Examines how individuals use entre- 
preneurial skills to craft innovative responses to societal needs. Also listed as BUS 113. (BUS 113 
does not count towards the Calloway major.) 

350. Internships in Entrepreneurial Studies. (3h) Offers students the opportunity to apply knowl- 
edge in an entrepreneurial for-profit or not-for-profit environment. Requirements include a 
course journal and a comprehensive report that showcase the student's specific achievements 
and analyze the quality of their experience. P — POI. 

391 . Independent Study in Entrepreneurship. (3h) An independent project involving entrepre- 
neurship or social enterprise carried out under the supervision of the faculty member. P — POI. 

Electives for Entrepreneurship and Social Enterprise 

Additional elective courses may have been approved since publication of this bulletin. The 
program director maintains a complete list of all approved elective courses. For the following 
course descriptions, see the relevant department's listings in this bulletin. 

ESE 201. Free Trade, Fair Trade: Independent Entrepreneurs in the Global Market. (3h) Field-based 
seminar compares the barriers to market participation experienced by independent entrepre- 
neurs cross-culturally. Free trade policies are contrasted with fair trade practices to determine 
why so many independent producers have trouble succeeding in a globalizing world. Also 
listed as ANT 301. (CD) 

ESE 202. Building a Better Biology Textbook: The Accessible Textbook Project. (3h) Hands-on 
project requiring the skills of juniors and seniors from multiple disciplines. Participants assist 
in developing a prototype for an introductory biology textbook. Collaborative teams conduct 
preliminary market research, design the book format, develop a set of authoring tools, write 
the content of one prototype chapter, and assess the instructional effectiveness of their final 
product. P— POI. 

ESE 203. Introduction to Professional Writing. (3h) A hands-on course in writing across a number 
of disciplines — Website copy, brochures, public relations, corporate statements, marketing 
proposals. The course partners with a local nonprofit organization for the length of the semester 
and provides writing solutions, including Website copy, for that organization. Local experts 
visit to address specific skills. Also listed as JOU 283. P— -JOU 270 or POI. 

ESE 301 -304. Topics in Entrepreneurship (1.5 or 3h). Seminar and/or lecture courses in select top- 
ics related to entrepreneurship. May be repeated if course title differs. 

Thought and Behavior 

BIO 396. Biomedical Ethics. (3h) 

COM 305. Communication and Ethics. (3h) 

ECN 268. Morals and Markets. (3h) 

HON 240. Adventures in Self-Understanding. (3h) 

HMN 290. Innovation and Inclusivity. (3h) 



133 



ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SOCIAL ENTERPRISE 



PHI 161. Medical Ethics. (3h) 

220. Logic. (3h) 
360. Ethics. (3h) 

PSY 260. Social Psychology. (3h) 

268. Industrial /Organizational Psychology. (3h) 

Leadership and Engaging the World 

ANT 342. Development Wars: Applying Anthropology. (3h) 
BUS 265. Ethics and Business Leadership. (3h) 
COM 110. Public Speaking. (3h) 

113. Interpersonal Communication. (3h) 

114. Group Communication. (3h) 

315. Communication and Technology. (3h) 
EDU 281. Public Life and the Liberal Arts. (3h) 

358. Studies in Contemporary Leadership. (3h) 

396. Education in Business and Industry. (3h) 
ENV 201. Environmental Issues. (3h) 
FRH 321. Introduction to Translation. (3h) 

329. Introduction to Business French. (3h) 
HMN 245. Interdisciplinary Seminar in Critical Thinking. (1.5h) 
HST 349. American Foundations. (3h) 

350. Global Economic History. (3h) 

380. America at Work. (3h) 
INS 260. Introduction to Global Trade and Commerce Studies. (3h) 

363. Global Capitalism. (3h) 
LIN 383. Language Engineering: Localization and Terminology. (3h) 
POL 212. U.S. Policymaking in the Twenty-first Century. (3h) 

238. Comparative Economic Development and Political Change. (3h) 
REL 332. Religion and Public Life. (3h) 
SOC 308. Sociology of Art. (3h) 

362. Work, Conflict, and Change. (3h) 

363. Global Capitalism. (3h) 
SPN 381. Spanish Translation. (3h) 

382. Spanish /English Interpreting. (3h) 

387. Introduction to Spanish for Business. (3h) 

Entrepreneurial Process 

ACC 111. Intioductory Financial Accounting. (3h) 
ANT 305. Museum Anthropology. (4h) 
ART 215. Public Art. (3h) 

297. Management in the Visual Arts. (3h) 
BUS 100. Introduction to Business Communications. (1.5h) 
211. Organizational Behavior. (3h) 

216. Leading in the Nonprofit Sector. (3h) 

217. Change Management. (3h) 

221. Principles of Marketing. (3h) 

261. Legal Environment of Business. (3h) 



ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SOCIAL ENTERPRISE ^^4: 



COM 102. Debate and Advocacy. (3h) 

117. Writing for Public Relations and Advertising. (1.5h, 3h) 
140. Information and Disinformation on the Internet. (1.5h) 
212. Introduction to Production and Theory. (3h) 
220. Empirical Research in Communication. (3h) 
245. Introduction to Mass Communication. (3h) 
316. Screen writing. (3h) 

335. Survey of Organizational Communication. (3h) 

336. Organizational Rhetoric. (3h) 

337. Rhetoric of Institutions. (3h) 

350. Intercultural Communication. (3h) 

353. Persuasion. (3h) 
ECN 150. Introduction to Economics. (3h) 

205. Intermediate Microeconomics I. (3h) 
ENG 398. Advanced Fiction Writing. (3h) 
HST 361. Economic History of the U.S. (3h) 
JOU 286. Writing for Public Relahons and Advertising. (1.5h, 3h) 
POL 239. State, Economy, and International Competitiveness. (3h) 
PSY 310. Methods in Psychological Research. (4h) 
THE 259. Theatre Management: Principles and Practices. (3h) 



Environmental Program (ENV) 

Director Professor of Biology Robert A. Browne 



Interdisciplinary Minor in Environmental Science 

The Wake Forest environmental program offers an environmental science or an environmental 
studies minor. The environmental program provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study 
of human-environmental interaction. The program seeks to identify and apply perspectives 
from biology, chemistry, physics, geography, English, government, economics, history, law, 
ethics, and anthropology to the human impact on the natural environment. The envirormiental 
science or the environmental studies minor, coupled with a liberal arts major, is designed to 
prepare students for careers in the environmental sciences, law, public health, public policy, 
and public administration, and to develop attitudes and values consistent with a sustainable 
environmental future. 

201. Environmental Issues. (3h) Topics include environmental literature, environmental history, 
human populations, resource management, pollution, global change, and environmental ethics. 

250. Nautical Sciences. (3h) Provides the theoretical background necessary for operating ves- 
sels at sea. In lectures, lab sessions, field trips, and student projects. Sea Education Association 
captains introduce the principles fundamental to sailing vessel operations. Students learn and 
apply essential concepts in general physics, astronomy, and meteorology. Offered only in conjunc- 
tion with the Sea Education Association program. 



135 



ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAM 



391, 392. Individual Study. (1.5h, 1.5h) Field study, internship, project or research investigation 
carried out under the supervision of a member of the environmental program faculty. Pass /fail 
or for a grade at the discretion of the instructor. Pass /fail is not an option if used as an elective 
for the environmental science or environmental studies minor. 

The following courses are required for the environmental science minor. For course descriptions, 
see the relevant department's listings in this bulletin. 

ENV 201. Environmental Issues. (3h) 
CHM/PHY 120. Physics and Chemistry of the Environment. (4h) 
ECN 150. Introduction to Economics (3h) 

241. Natural Resource Economics. (3h) 

A total of eighteen hours (including eight hours of elective courses) is required for the minor. 
The following courses can serve as electives for the environmental science minor. Additional 
elective courses may have been approved since publication of this bulletin. The program direc- 
tor maintains a complete list of all approved elective courses. For course descriptions, see the 
relevant department's listings in this bulletin. 

Electives for Environmental Science Minor 

BIO 340. Ecology (4h) 

341. Marine Biology (4h) 

342. Aquatic Ecology (4h) 

343. Tropical Ecology. (3h) 

347. Physiological Plant Ecology. (3h) 
349S. Tropical Biodiversity. (4h) 
350. Conservation Biology. (3h) 
377. Community Ecology. (4h) 

385. Oceanography. (3h) 

386. Practical Oceanography. (4h) 
CHM 334. Chemical Analysis. (4h) 

ENV 250. Nautical Sciences. (3h) 
391. Individual Study. (1.5h) 



ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAM 



136 



Interdisciplinary Minor in Environmental Studies 

The following courses are required for the environmental studies minor. For course descriptions, 
see the relevant department's listings in this bulletin. 

ENV 201. Environmental Issues. (3h) 
ANT 339. Culture and Nature. (3h) 
ECN 150. Introduction to Economics (3h) 

241. Natural Resource Economics. (3h) 

A total of eighteen hours (including nine hours of elective courses) is required for the minor. 
The following courses can serve as electives for the environmental studies minor. Additional 
elective courses may have been approved since publication of this bulletin. The program direc- 
tor maintains a complete list of all approved elective courses. For course descriptions, see the 
relevant department's listings in this bulletin. 

Electives for Environmental Studies Minor 

BIO 340. Ecology. (4h) 

341. Marine Biology. (4h) 

342. Aquatic Ecology. (4h) 

343. Tropical Ecology. (3h) 

347. Physiological Plant Ecology. (3h) 
349S. Tropical Biodiversity. (4h) 
350. Conservation Biology. (3h) 
377. Community Ecology. (4h) 

385. Oceanography. (3h) 

386. Practical Oceanography. (4h) 

CHM 120. Physics and Chemistry of the Environment. (4h) 

334. Chemical Analysis. (4h) 
EDU 271. Geography: The Human Environment. (3h) 

274. Environmental Geography. (3h) 
ENV 250. Nautical Sciences. (3h) 

391. Individual Study. (1.5h) 
HMN 250. Maritime Studies. (3h) 

365. Humanity and Nature. (3h) 
PHI 163. Environmental Ethics. (3h) 
PHY 120. Physics and Chemistry of the Environment. (4h) 



137 



ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAM 



Film Studies 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 

Director Reynolds Professor of Film Studies Peter Brunette 

Film studies offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of film through a body of courses 
that exposes students to the cultural, political, and social implications of this art form. Courses 
in the minor provide students with the critical tools necessary for both evaluating and produc- 
ing film texts, and they prepare qualified students to choose critical and /or creative paths for 
further study or toward a profession. More information on the film studies program is available 
at www.wfu.edu/film. 

A minor in film studies requires a minimum of eighteen hours of approved courses. Candi- 
dates for the minor must complete Introduction to Film (COM 246) and Film Theory and Criti- 
cism (COM 311) and an additional twelve hours of courses: at least three hours from each of the 
designated fields of international cinema and production, and six hours of electives. 

Additional elective courses may have been approved since publication of this bulletin. The 
program director maintains a complete list of all approved elective courses. For course descrip- 
tions, see the relevant department's listings in this publication. 

Film Studies (FLM) 

101, 102. Internship in Film Studies I and II. (1.5h, 1.5h) Individual internships in film studies to 
be approved, supervised, and evaluated by an appropriate member of the film studies faculty. 
The nature and extent of the internship will determine whether both sections can be taken 
simultaneously. Pass /fail only. P — POL 

Film Studies Required Courses 

COM 246. Introduction to Film. (3h) 

311. Film Theory and Criticism. (3h) 

Film Studies Electives in International Cinema 

ART 261. Topics in Film History. (3h) (When topic relates to international cinema) 
396K. Art History Seminar (Film). (3h) WJien topic relates to international cinema 
COM 370. Special Topics. (3h) Wlien topic relates to international cinema 

FRH 360. Cinema and Society. (3h) 
HMN 252. Inh-oduction to Chinese Film. (3h) 

382. Italian Cinema and Society. (3h) 

383. Italian Fascism in Novels and Films. (3h) 
ITA 325. Italian Neorealism in Films and Novels. (3h) 

326. Comedy in Italian Cinema. (3h) 

327. Modem Italian Cinema. (3h) 

330. Cinematic Adaptation and Literary Inspiration. (3h) 
SPN 339. Introduction to Spanish Film Studies. (3h) 
340. Film Adaptations of Literary Works. (3h) 
366. Latin- American Cinema and Ideology. (3h) 



FILM STUDIES 



138 



Film Studies Electives in Production 

ART 114. Digital Art I. (3h) 
214. Digital Art II. (3h) 
COM 212. Introduction to Production and Theory. (3h) 

213. Media Production: Documentary. (3h) 

214. Media Production: Narrative. (3h) ' 
310. Advanced Media Production. (3h) 

316. Screenwriting. (3h) 
THE 141. On-Camera Performance. (3h) 

General Film Studies Electives 

ART 260. Classics of World Cinema. (3h) 

261. Topics in Film History. (3h) 

396K. Art History Seminar: Film (3h) 
COM 312. Film History to 1945. (3h) 

313. Film History since 1945. (3h) 

370. Special Topics. (l-3h) When topic relates to film studies 
ENG 373. Literature and Film. (3h) 

FLM 101., 102. Internship in Film Studies I and II. (1.5h, 1.5h) 
SOC 366. The Sociological Analysis of Film. (3h) 



German and Russian 

Chair Kurt C. Shaw 

Professors William S. Hamilton, Larry E. West 

Associate Professors Kurt C. Shaw, Rebecca Thomas 

Assistant Professors Aiyssa Lonner, Grant P. McAllister 

Lecturers Perry L. Patterson, Heiko Wiggers 

The major in German requires nine courses beyond 153 to include one course from the sequence 
210, 212 or 2147 [Vienna], 317, 399, and at least one course from the sequence 349, 381, 383, 385. 

The minor in German requires five courses beyond 153, to include one course from the sequence 
210, 212 or 2147 [Vienna], 317 and at least one course from the sequence 349, 381, 383, 385. 

German majors and minors are required to take the Zertifikat Deutsch (ZD) examination in 
their last semester or senior year. A more advanced examination, the Zentrale Mittelstufenprii- 
fung (ZMP), is optional. The Zertifikat Deutsch fiir den Beruf (ZDfB) is offered at the end of 
GER 330. 

Honors: Highly qualified majors will be invited by the department to participate in the honors 
program in German. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in German," students must 
complete a senior research project. For additional information, members of the departmental 
faculty should be consulted. 

Students of German are invited to apply for the W.D. Sanders Scholarships and for programs 
of study at Freiburg, Berlin, and Vienna, administered by the Institute for the International 
Education of Students (lES). 



139 



GERMAN AND RUSSIAN 



The major in German studies requires nine courses beyond 153 to include one course from the 
sequence 210, 212 or 2147 [Vienna], two courses from the sequence 331, 335, 340, 345, one course 
from the sequence 390-5, and five electives, two of which must be from external departments 
(music, history, religion, political science, philosophy). Students may take more than one course 
from the 390-5 sequence for elective credit. 

The minor in German studies requires five courses beyond 153, to include one course from the 
sequence 210, 212 or 2147 [Vienna], and 317. 

The major in Russian requires twenty-four hours beyond 153 and must include 210, 212, 317, 
and 321. 

The minor in Russian requires fifteen hours beyond 153 and must include 210 and 212. 

German (GER) 

111,112. Elementary German. (4h, 4h) Introduction to German language and culture. Two 
semester sequence. 

113. Intensive Elementary German. (4h) One-semester course covering the material of GER 111 
and 112. For students whose preparation for GER 153 is inadequate or who have demonstrated 
proficiency in another language. Not open to students who have had GER 111 or 112. 

153. Intermediate German. (4h) The principles of grammar are reviewed; reading of selected 
prose and poetry. P — GER 112 or 113. 

210. The German Experience. (3h) A multidisciplinary course dealing with the vast arena of Ger- 
man culture ranging from literature, art and architecture to music, philosophy, and film. "High" 
culture, as well as current trends in pop music, film, and TV programming are covered. P — 153. 

212. Introduction to German Literature. (3h) Short masterpieces of German literature. P — GER 
153 or equivalent. 

317. Composition and Grammar Review. (3h) Review of the fundamentals of German grammar 
with intensive practice in translation and composition. Required for majors and minors. Fall. 
P — GER 153 or equivalent. 

318. Practice in Speaking German. (3h) Vocabulary for everyday situations, fluency and pronun- 
ciation, discussion of various topics from easy to advanced, listening exercises, free speaking, 
oral presentations. Spring. P — 153 or equivalent. 

320. German Culture and Civilization I. (3h) Survey of German culture and civilization from 
prehistoric times to 1871. Conducted in German. Offered fall semester of odd years. P — GER 153 or 
equivalent. (CD) 

321 . German Culture and Civilization II. (3h) Survey of German culture and civilization from 1871 
to the present, with emphasis on contemporary Germany. Conducted in German. Offered spring 
semester of even years. P — GER 153 or equivalent. (CD) 

322. Internship in German Language. (1.5h-3h) Under faculty direction, a student mentors lo- 
cal German students at the middle or high school level. Focus is on vocabulary building and 
reinforcing basic grammar structures. Requirements include, but are not limited to: keeping a 
journal, compiling a portfolio of teaching materials, and consulting regularly with the faculty 



GERMAN AND RUSSIAN -^/^q 



director. May be repeated for a total of six hours, only three of which may count towards the 
major or minor. Pass/Fail only. P — GER 317 or POL 

329. Business German I. (3h) Emphasis on social market economy, writing resumes, the Euro- 
pean Union, job ads and job interviews, current topics in German business, oral proficiency, 
business correspondence, grammar review, business etiquette, banking, and financing. 

P— GER 317 or POL 

330. Business German IL (3h) Prepares students for the internationally acknowledged exam, 
Zertifikat Deutsch fiir den Beruf, which is offered at the end of the semester. Other topics 
include: writing a business plan, the structure of German companies, current topics in German 
business, oral proficiency, business correspondence, and business theory. P — GER 329 or POL 

331 . Weimar Germany. (3h) Art, literature, music, and film of Weimar Germany, 1919-1933, in 
historical context. Also listed as HST 318. Taught in English. 

335. German Film. (3h) Survey of German cinema from the silent era to the present. Taught in 
English. 

340. German Masterworks in Translation. (3h) Examination of selected works of German, Aus- 
trian, and Swiss fiction in English translation by such writers as Goethe, Schiller, Kafka, Mann, 
and Schnitzler. Literary periods, genres, and authors vary according to instructor. Students may 
not receive credit towards the German major or minor for both GER 340 and GER 331. Fall. 

345. History of the German Language. (3h) Survey of the development of the German language 
from prehistoric times to modem day German. Topics include: From Indo-European to 
Germanic, phonetical and lexical changes of the German language. Old High German, Middle 
High German, Early New High German, and Modem Standard German. Taught in English. No 
prior knowledge of linguistics necessary. P — GER 210 or 212 or equivalent or POL 

349. German Literature before 1 700. (3h) Survey of German literature of the Middle Ages, Ref- 
ormation, and Baroque eras; emphasizes the chivalric period, medieval drama, Martin Luther, 
and the Baroque period. P — GER 212, or equivalent. Fall. 

370. Individual Study. (l-3h) Readings on selected topics in literature or current events not ordi- 
narily covered in other courses. P — GER 212 and POL 

381 . German Literature from the Enlightenment through Romanticism. (3h) Selected works from 
the Enlightenment, the Storm and Stress period, the poetry and major dramas of Goethe and 
Schiller, and German Romanticism. Fall. P — GER 212 or equivalent. 

383. German Literature from Poetic Realism through Naturalism. (3h) Study of selected works 
from the Realist period and subsequent Naturalist movement, with attention to the historical 
and social contexts in which they emerge. P — GER 212 or equivalent. 

385. German Literature of the Modern Age. (3h) Lntensive study of representative works of 
major German, Austrian, and Swiss authors of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Fall. 
P— GER 212 or equivalent. (CD) 

387, 388. Honors in German. (2.5h, 2.5h) Conference course in German literature. A major 
research paper is required. Designed for candidates for departmental honors. 

399. Seminar in the Major. (3h) Intensive examination of a selected genre or special topic to be 
determined by the instructor. Intensive practice in critical discourse, including discussion and 



141 



GERMAN AND RUSSIAN 



an oral presentation in German. Introduction to literary scholarship and research methodology 
leading to a documented paper. Required for all majors. May be repeated. Spring. P — GER 349, 
381, 383, 385, or equivalent. 

Semester in Graz 

322. Internship in German Language. (3h) Under faculty direction, a student serves as a Ger- 
man language intern for the faculty, staff, and students at the American Institute for Musical 
Studies, Graz, Austria. The student translates public and private documents, and performs 
any necessary tasks for the organization for which knowledge of German is essential. Course 
requirements include, but are not limited to: keeping a journal and compiling a portfolio of all 
translations and documents created in German for the organization. May be repeated for a total 
of six hours, only three of which may count towards the major or minor. Offered only in Graz, 
Austria. Pass/Fail only P— GER 317 or POL 

Semester in Vienna 

2147. Masterpieces of Austrian Literature. (3h) Study of masterpieces of Austrian literature of 
the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. Lecture and discussion in German. Offered 
only at the Flow House in Vienna. P — 153 or equivalent. 

3227. Internship in German Language. (1.5h-3h) Under faculty direction, a student tutors English 
at local elementary schools in Vienna. Focus is on vocabulary building and basic conversation. 
Course requirements include, but are not limited to: keeping a journal, compiling a portfolio 
of teaching materials, and consulting regularly with the faculty director. May be repeated for 
a total of six hours, only three of which may count towards the major or minor. Pass /Fail only. 
Offered only at the Flow House in Vienna. 

3407. Special topics in German and Austrian Literature and Culture. (3h) Credit towards the Ger- 
man major or minor. Taught in English. Offered only at the Flow House in Vienna. 

3507. Fin de Siecle Vienna. (3h) Survey of major developments in Viennese art, music, literature, 
and society from roughly 1889 to 1918. Important figures to be discussed are Mahler, Schoen- 
berg, Klimt, Schiele, Schnitzler, Musil, Freud, and Herzl. Offered only at the Flow House in Vienna. 

HMN 2157. Germanic and Slavic Literature. Taught in English. Offered only at the Flow House 
in Vienna. 

German Studies (GST) 

In addition to the courses listed under the German major, the German studies major also offers 
the following courses, all of which are conducted in English: 

390. German Women Writers. (3h) Examination of selected works by women authors. Literary 
periods, genres, and authors vary according to instructor. 

391. German and Austrian Music. (3h) Introduction to masterworks of German and Austrian 
composers from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. 

392. The Oberammergau Passion Play. (3h) Intensive study of the Oberammergau play viewed 
against the backdrop of the late Middle Ages. 



GERMAN AND RUSSIAN 



142 



393. Luther. (3h) Survey of Luther's life, writings and political influence during his life and 
after. Additional emphasis on Luther's anti-Semitic writings as a subtext of German National 
Socialist ideology. 

394. German Myths, Legends, and Fairy Tales, (3h) Study of German myths, legends, and fairy 
tales since the Middle Ages and their role in the formation of German national identity. 

395. Special Topics in German Studies. (3h) 

Russian (RUS) 

111,112. Elementary Russian. (4h, 4h) Essentials of Russian grammar, conversation, drill, and 
reading of elementary texts. 

153. Intermediate Russian. (4h) Principles of Russian grammar are reviewed and expanded 
upon; reading of short prose pieces and materials from the Russian press. P — RUS 112 or 
equivalent. 

210. The Russians and Their World. (3h) An introductory look at Russian culture and society, 
with topics ranging from history, religion, art, and literature to contemporary Russian popular 
music, TV, and film. Taught in Russian. P — 153 or equivalent. 

212. Introduction to Russian Literature. (3h) Reading of selected short stories and excerpts from 
longer works by Russian authors from the nineteenth century to the present. P — RUS 153 
or equivalent. 

317. Seminar in Russian Literature. (3h) In-depth reading and discussion of shorter novels and 
occasional short stories by the foremost Russian authors from the nineteenth century to the 
present. P— RUS 212. 

321. Conversation and Composition. (3h) Study of grammar at the advanced level. Intensive 
practice in composition and conversation based on contemporary Russian materials. 
P— RUS 210 or 212. 

328. Advanced Grammar. (3h) Mastery of Russian declension and conjugation, with special at- 
tention to the correct use of reference materials. Syntax of complex and problematic sentences. 
P— RUS 321. 

330. The Structure of Russian. (3h) The linguistic tools of phonetics, phonemics, and morpho- 
phonemics are explained and applied to modern Russian. Emphasis on the study of roots and 
word formation. P — POL 

332. The History of the Russian Language. (3h) The evolution of Russian from Common Slavic to 
the modem language; theory of linguistic reconstruction and the Indo-European family; read- 
ings from selected Old East Slavic texts. P— RUS 321 and POL 

340. Seminar in Translation. (3h) Advanced work in English-to-Russian and Russian-to-English 
translation. P— RUS 321 and POL 

341 . Russian Masterworks in Translation. (3h) Reading and discussion of selected works from 
Russian literature in English translation by such writers as Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Bulga- 
kov, and Solzhenitsyn. (D) 



143 



GERMAN AND RUSSIAN 



354. Language of the Russian Press and Mass Media. (3h) Readings from Russian newspapers, 
magazines and the Internet, as well as exposure to Russian television and radio broadcasts. Em- 
phasis is on improving reading and listening skills and vocabulary acquisition. P — 210 or 212. 

370. Individual Study. (1.5-3h) Study in language or literature beyond the 210-212 level. May be 
repeated for credit. P — RUS 212 or higher. 

390. The Language of Russian Commerce and Politics. (3h) Readings in the contemporary Russian 
press. Intensive written and oral practice, emphasizing specialized vocabulary of business and 
government. P— RUS 321 or POL 



Global Trade and Commerce Studies (GTCS) 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) _ , — . . 

Coordinator Associate Professor of Political Science Pia Christina Wood 

The minor in global trade and commerce studies consists of a total of fifteen hours. Candidates 
for the minor will be required to take INS 260 (Introduction to Global Trade and Commerce 
Studies) and twelve additional hours in global trade and commerce studies, which must in- 
clude a study abroad experience for credit. No more than six of the fifteen hours for the minor 
may be taken in a single discipline. The following list contains courses within Wake Forest 
University that qualify as a global trade and commerce studies course. Courses taken during 
the study abroad experience which may qualify as a GTCS course also will be reviewed and 
approved by the director of international studies. 

Required Course for Global Trade and Commerce Studies 

INS 260. Introduction to Global Trade and Commerce Studies. (3h) Provides foundational knowl- 
edge in global trade and commerce. Focuses on understanding the global environment and the 
variety of issues associated with global trade and commerce. 

Elective Courses for Global Trade and Commerce Studies 

Additional elective courses may have been approved since publication of this bulletin. The 
program coordinator maintains a complete list of all approved elective courses. For course 
descriptions, see the relevant department's listings in this publication. 

ANT 337. Economic Anthropology. (3h) 
ACC 290. International Accounting. (3h) 
BUS 113. Foundations of Entiepreneurship. (3h) zoith permission of coordinator 

215. Seminar in Comparative Management. (3h) 

222. Global Marketing Strategy. (3h) 

234. International Finance. (3h) 

290. International Business Study Tour. (3h) 
CHI 255. Business Hanyu. (3h) 
COM 350. Intercultural Communication. (3h) 

351. Comparative Communication. (3h) 

354. International Communication. (3h) 



GLOBAL TRADE AND COMMERCE STUDIES ^44 



ECN 251. International Trade. (3h) 

252. International Finance. (3h) 

253. Economies in Transition. (3h) 

254. Current Issues in African Development, (study tour) (3h) 
258. Economic Growth and Development. (3h) 

FRH 329. Introduction to Business French. (3h) 

330. Advanced Business French. (3h) 
HST 224. Great Britain. (3h) 

231. Russia and the Soviet Union: 1865 to Present. (3h) 

247. Japan since 1800. (3h) 

249. Introduction to East Asia. (3h) 

275. Modem Latin America. (3h) 

314. European Economic and Social History, 1750-1990. (3h) 

350. Global Economic History. (3h) 
POL 232. Politics in Russia and Eastern Europe. (3h) 

235. European Integration. (3h) 

238. Comparative Economic Development and Political Change. (3h) 

239. State, Economy and International Competitiveness. (3h) 
253. International Political Economy. (3h) 

256. International Security. (3h) 

257. Interamerican Relations. (3h) 
260. U.S. and East Asia. (3h) 

262. International Organizations. (3h) 
PSY 357. Cross-Cultijral Psychology (3h) 
SOC 333. The Sociology of Cities (3h) 

363. Global Capitalism. (3h) 
SPN 387. Introduction to Spanish for Business. (3h) 

388. Advanced Spanish for Business. (3h) 

Health and Exercise Science (HES) 

Chair Paul M. RibisI 

Thurman D. Kitchin Professor of Health and Exercise Science W. Jack Rejeski 

Charles E.Taylor Professor of Health and Exercise Science Paul M. RibisI 

Professors Michael J. Berry, Peter H. Brubaker, Stephen R Messier 

Professor Emeritus William L Hettinger 

Dunn-Riley Jr. Professor and Associate Professor Shannon L Mihaiko 

Associate Professors Anthony R Marsh, Gary D. Miller, Patricia A. Nixon 

Visiting Assistant Professors Jeffrey A. Katula, Joseph F. Seay 

Instructors Johnnie O. Foye, David H. Stroupe, Sharon K. Woodard 

The purpose of the health and exercise science department is to advance knowledge through 
research and to disseminate the knowledge in this field of study through education of and 
service to humanity. The primary focus of the department is promoting health and preventing 
and treating disease through healthful behaviors, emphasizing physical activity and nutrition. 



145 



HEALTH AND EXERCISE SCIENCE 



Health and Exercise Science Requirement 

All students must complete HES 100 and 101. This requirement must be met before enrollment 
in additional health and exercise science elective courses, and in any case by the end of the 
second year. 

Courses for the Major 

The department offers a program leading to the bachelor of science degree in health and exer- 
cise science. A major requires thirty-one hours and must include HES 262, 312, 350, 351, 352, 
353, 354, 360, and 370. Majors are not allowed to apply any HES 100-level courses or HES 206 
toward the thirty-one hours required for graduation. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 is 
required for graduation in courses that comprise a major in the department. Students interested 
in majoring in health and exercise science should consult the coordinator of the department's 
undergraduate program as soon as possible after entering the University. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the honors 
program in health and exercise science by the second semester of the junior year. To be gradu- 
ated with the designation "Honors in Health and Exercise Science," a student must have a 
minimum grade point average of 3.3 in the major, a minimum overall grade point average of 
3.0, and complete an honors research project which includes a written and an oral report. Inter- 
ested students should consult the coordinator of the department's honors program. For more 
information, please consult the department's Web site at wwrvv.wfu.edu/hes. 

201 . Health Issues on College Campuses I. (1.5h) Introduction to concepts and methods of peer 
health education; development of teaching and group facilitation skills. Pass/Fail only. P — POI. 

202. Health Issues on College Campuses II. (1.5h) Development and delivery of educational pro- 
grams on a variety of health issues relevant to college students. Pass/Fail only. P — HES 201. 

206. Lifeguard Training. (1.5h) Lifeguard training course that offers American Red Cross 
certifications in CPR for the professional rescuer, community first aid, lifeguard training, and 
waterfront lifeguarding. 

232. Emergency Medical Training. (3h) Lectures and practical experiences in preparation for 
responding to medical emergencies, including: patient assessment; airway management; 
cardiopulmonary resuscitation; O2 therapy; management of shock; trauma and environmental 
emergencies; and head /spine /musculoskeletal injuries. North Carolina state exam for EMT 
certification is offered. 

262. Statistics in the Health Sciences. (3h) Basic statistics with emphasis on application to 
research in the health sciences. Students are introduced to graphics and statistical software for 
statistical analysis. (QR) 

310. Applied Field Study. (1.5h) Application of theory and methods of solving problems in a 
specialized area according to the student's immediate career goals. Open only to majors. Pass/ 
Fail only. P— POI. 

31 1. Internship in Rehabilitation. (1.5h) A semester experience in the campus rehabilitation pro- 
grams. Includes written case study analyses of selected patients with a focus upon risk factor 
assessment and review of multiple intervention strategies, in conjunction with participation in 
physiologic monitoring of patients during therapeutic sessions. Open only to majors. Pass/Fail 
only P— POI. 



HEALTH AND EXERCISE SCIENCE ^^^ 



312. Exercise and Health Psychology. (3h) Survey of the psychological antecedents of exercise 
and selected topics in health psychology with particular attention to wellness, stress, the bio- 
behavioral basis of coronary heart disease, and the psychodynamics of rehabilitative medicine. 
P— HES 262 or POL 

350. Human Physiology. (3h) Lecture course which presents the basic principles and concepts of 
the function of selected systems of the human body, with emphasis on the muscular, cardiovas- 
cular, pulmonary, and nervous systems. P — BIO 111, 112, or 214, or POL 

351. Nutrition in Health and Disease. (3h) Lecture /laboratory course which presents the prin- 
ciples of proper nutrition including an understanding of the basic foodstuffs and nutrients as 
well as the influence of genetics, eating behavior, and activity patterns on energy balance and 
weight control. Laboratory experiences examine intervention in obesity and coronary heart 
disease through diet analysis, methods of diet prescription, and behavior modification. 

P— HES 350 or POL 

352. Human Gross Anatomy. (4h) Lecture /laboratory course in which the structure and function 
of the musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, pulmonary, and cardiovascular systems are studied us- 
ing dissected human cadavers. Open only to majors. 

353. Physiology of Exercise. (3h) Lecture course which presents the concepts and applications of 
the physiological response of the human body to physical activity. Acute and chronic responses 
of the muscular and cardiorespiratory systems to exercise are examined. Topics include exercise 
and coronary disease, nutrition and performance, strength and endurance training, body com- 
position, sex-related differences, and environmental influences. P — HES 350 or POL 

354. Assessment Techniques in Health Sciences. (3h) Lecture /laboratory course to develop clini- 
cal skills and knowledge in the assessment of health in areas of exercise physiology, nutrition/ 
metabolism, biomechanics /neuromuscular function, and health psychology. Labs emphasize 
use of instrumentation and analysis /interpretation of data collected on human subjects. 

P— HES 262, 350, and 352 or POL (QR) 

355. Exercise Programming. (1.5h) Lecture /laboratory course which presents the scientific 
principles of safe and effective exercise prescription for fitness programs. P — HES 350 or POL 

360. Epidemiology. (3h) Introduction to basic determinants of the incidence of chronic disease in 
the population and development of an understanding of individual, community, and environ- 
mental approaches to promoting healthful lifestyles in youth, adults, and elderly populations. 
Issues are analyzed by formal statistical modeling. P — An applied statistical methods course, 
such as ANT 380, BIO 380, BUS 202, HES 262, MTH 256 or 358, PSY 311, or SOC 371. (QR) 

370. Biomechanics of Human Movement. (3h) Study of the mechanical principles which influ- 
ence human movement, sport technique, and equipment design. P — HES 352 or POL 

372. Anatomy Dissection Laboratory. (2h) Laboratory course that involves human cadaver dis- 
section of the musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, pulmonary, and cardiovascular systems. Open 
only to majors. P — POL 

375. Advanced Physiology of Exercise. (3h) Lecture course which provides an in-depth exami- 
nation of the physiological mechanisms responsible for both the acute and chronic changes 
which occur with exercise. Included are cellular changes in response to exercise, the ventilatory 
response to exercise, and metabolic consequences of exercise. P — HES 353 or POL 



147 



HEALTH AND EXERCISE SCIENCE 



376. Interventions in Behavioral Medicine. (3h) Seminar course providing an overview of the 
development, implementation, and evaluation of interventions within the context of behav- 
ioral medicine. Attention is on behavior change theories that have served as the framework for 
physical activity and weight loss interventions. Hands-on experience is included with current 
interventions through peer counseling and case study analysis. 

382. Individual Study. (Ih, 1.5h, 2h) Independent study directed by a faculty adviser. Students 
must consult the adviser before registering for this course. Open only to majors. P — POI. 

384. Special Topics in Health and Exercise Science. (1.5h, 2h, 3h) Intensive investigation of a cur- 
rent scientific research topic in health or exercise science with focus on a specific topic. May be 
repeated for credit if topic differs. P — Contingent on topic offered and POI. 

386. Honors Research. (1.5h) Directed study and research in preparation for a major paper on a 
subject of mutual interest to the student and faculty honors adviser. Taken only by candidates 
for departmental honors. P — POI, approval of departmental honors committee, and prior 
completion of a 1.5-hour Individual Study. 

Courses in Basic Instruction and Elective Health and Exercise Science 

All the 100-level courses listed below are for one hour each, and they can only be taken once for 
credit except HES 183 which may be repeated once. 

100. Lifestyle and Health. Lecture course that deals with the effect of lifestyle behaviors on 
various health outcomes, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and sexually-transmitted 
diseases. 

101 . Exercise for Health. Laboratory course on physical fitness that covers weight control, cardio- 
vascular endurance, muscular strength, and flexibility. 

112. Sports Proficiency. 

1 1 6. Weight Training. 

1 50. Beginning Tennis. 

151. Intermediate Tennis. 

160. Beginning Golf. 

1 61 . Intermediate Golf. 
163. Bowling. 

170. Volleyball. 

182. Beginning Ice Figure Skating. 

183. Intermediate/ Advanced Ice Figure Skating. May be repeated once for credit. 
194.T'aiChi. 



HEALTH AND EXERCISE SCIENCE i4g 



Health Policy and Administration (HPA) 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 
Director Professor of Economics Michael S. Lawlor 

The health policy and administration minor is designed to give students a concentration in the 
area of public health policy and the study of health care delivery. It is open to all majors and 
places an emphasis on providing students with the analytical methods and knowledge of in- 
stitutional complexity necessary to an understanding of the rapidly evolving medical industry. 
Students interested in either public policy or administrative roles in health care could benefit 
from the minor. The coursework requires the following five courses (three hours each), for a 
total of fifteen hours, plus some notable prerequisites (see individual course descriptions for 
details): 

150. Introduction to Public Health. (3h) Survey of the basic structure of the health care system in 
the United States. Includes discussion of current issues of public policy toward health, orga- 
nization of health care delivery, and health system reform. Serves as the introduction to the 
interdisciplinary minor in health policy and administration. Offered every fall. 

250. Internship in Health Policy and Administration. (3h) A semester experience in a health care 
policy or health care administration organization. Students work in conjunction with a direc- 
tor who is a researcher on a public health science research project or with an administrator in 
health care delivery. Students gain relevant practical experience that builds on prior course- 
work and provides insight into public health policy issues. Open only to senior health policy 
and administration students. P— HPA 150 and POL Offered every spring. 

Required Course? for Health Policy and Administration: 

ECN 240. Economics of Health and Medicine. (3h) Fall 
HPA 150. Introduction to Public Health. (3h) Fall 

250. Internship in Health Policy and Administration. (3h) Spring 
HES 360. Epidemiology. (3h) Spring 

Elective Courses for Health Policy and Administration 

Choose one course from the following electives. Additional elective courses may have been ap- 
proved since publication of this bulletin. The program director maintains a complete list of all 
approved elective courses. For course descriptions, see the relevant department's listings in this 
publication. 

ANT 362. Medical Anthropology. (3h) 
BIO 396. Biomedical Ethics. (3h) 
HES 312. Exercise and Health Psychology. (3h) 

HST 311. Special Topics in History. (3h) (when topic is controversies in American 
medical history) 
339. Health Care in American Society. (3h) 
HMN 390. Interdisciplinary Seminar on Aging. (3h) 
PHI 161. Medical Ethics. (3h) 
POL 216. U.S. Social Welfare Policy. (3h) 
PSY 322. Psychopharmacology. (3h) 



149 



HEALTH POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION 



SOC 335. Sociology of Health and Illness. (3h) 

336. Sociology of Health Care. (3h) 

337. Aging in Modem Society. (3h) 

WGS 321. Research Seminar in Women's and Gender Studies. (3h) 
(when topic is appropriate) 

Since many of the required courses involve prerequisites students should plan ahead to ensure 
they can meet all of the requirements in four years. The following schedule suggestions may be 
helpful: 

First Year: Core Requirements, including ECN 1 50 

Sophomore: ECN 205, Applied Statistics (various departmental courses) 

Junior: HPA 150, HES360 

Senior: ECN 240, HPA 250 



History (HST) 

Chair SimoneCaron 

Reynolds Professor Paul D. Escort 

Wake Forest Professor Emeritus James P. Barefield 

Professors Nathan 0. Hatch, J. Edwin Hendricks, Michael L Hughes, J. Howell Smith, 

Sarah L Watts, Alan J. Williams 

Kahle Associate Professor Michele K. Gillespie 

Associate Professors Simone M. Caron, Jeffrey D. Lerner, Anthony S. Parent Jr., Susan Z. Rupp 

Assistant Professors Robert Hellyer, Monique O'Connell, Charles Wilkins 

Lecturers Ronald Bobroff, Gloria Fitzgibbon 

Instructor Stephen Vella 

Visiting Assistant Professors Michael Bennett, Anders Greenspan 

Visiting Instructors Angus Lockyer (London), Kent McConnell 

The major in history consists of a minimum of twenty-seven hours and must include HST 390 
or 392, one course in premodern history, and a minimum of 5.5 hours in each of the following 
three fields: European history; Latin American, Asian, or African history; and U.S. history. His- 
tory courses 101, 102, 103, 104, 390, 391, and 392 coimt toward the major but cannot be used to 
meet the distributional or pre-modem requirements in the major. 

Majors may include within the required twenty-seven hours up to six hours of advanced 
placement or comparable work and up to six hours of any combination of individual study and 
directed reading other than the hours earned in HST 397. The student must have a GPA of 2.0 in 
history to graduate with the major. 

A minor in history requires eighteen hours. Courses that the student elects to take pass/fail do 
not meet the requirements for the major or minor. 

Honors. Highly qualified majors should apply for admission to the honors program in history. 
To be graduated with the designation "Honors in History," the student must complete HST 391, 
present an honors-quality research paper, successfully defend the paper in an oral examination. 



HISTORY 250 



and earn an overall grade point average of 3.0 with an average of 3.3 on work in history. For 
additional information, students should consult members of the department. 

Students contemplating graduate study should acquire a reading knowledge of one modern 
foreign language for the master of arts degree and two for the PhD. 

101. Western Civilization to 1700. (3h) Survey of ancient, medieval, and early modern history to 
1700. Focus varies with instructor. Credit caimot be received for both 101 and 103, or 102 and 
104. (CD, D) 

102. Europe and the World in the Modern Era. (3h) Survey of modem Europe from 1700 to the 
present. Focus varies with instructor. Credit cannot be received for both 101 and 103, or 102 
and 104. (CD, D) 

1 027. Formation of Europe: Habsburg Empire and its Successor States. (3h) The development of 
Central and East-Central Europe as a multiethnic unity under the Habsburgs, 1526-1918, and its 
dissolution into successor states and subsequent interactions, 1918-1989. Offered in Vienna. 

1 03. World Civilizations to 1 500. (3h) Survey of the ancient, classical, and medieval civilizations 
of Eurasia with a brief look at American and sub-Saharan societies. Focus varies with instructor. 
Credit caimot be received for both 101 and 103, or 102 and 104. (CD, D) 

104. World Civilizations since 1500. (3h) Survey of the major civilizations of the world in the 
modern and contemporary periods. Focus varies with instructor. Credit cannot be received for 
both 101 and 103, or 102 and 104. (CD, D) 

1 05. Africa in World History. (3h) Examines the continent of Africa from prehistory to the present 
in global perspective, as experienced and understood by Africans themselves. (CD, D) 

106. Medieval World Civilizations. (3h) Survey of world civilizations from 600 C.E. to 1600 C.E., 
including political, religious, cultural, and economic developments. (CD, D) 

1 07. The Middle East and the World. (3h) Examines, in its global context, the history of the 
Middle East region from the inception of Islam in the seventh century to the twentieth century. 
Combines an introduction to Islamic civilization in its central lands with a close study of its 
interaction with other societies. (CD, D) 

1 262. The Golden Age of Burgundy. (1.5h) Burgimdian society, culture, and govenunent in the 
reigns of Philip the Bold, John the Fearless, Philip the Good, and Charles the Rash, 1384-1477. 
Offered in Dijon. 

131. European Historical Biography. (1.5h) Study of biographies of men and women who have 
influenced the history and civilization of Europe. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. 

1 32. European Historical Novels. (1.5h) The role of the historical past in selected works of fiction. 
May be repeated for credit if topic varies. 

140. Modern Slovenia. (Ih) Historical perspective of the politics, constitution, and culture of 
contemporary Slovenia. Includes lectures and visits to relevant sites. Offered in Ljubljana. 

162. History of Wake Forest University. (1.5h) Survey of the history of Wake Forest from its begin- 
ning, including its written and oral traditions. May include a visit to the town of Wake Forest. 

206. The Early Middle Ages. (3h) European history from the end of the ancient world to the mid- 
twelfth century, stressing social and cultural developments. 

,,--, HISTORY 



207. The High Middle Ages Through the Renaissance. (3h) European history from the mid-twelfth 
through the early sixteenth centuries, stressing social and cultural developments. 

209. Europe: From Renaissance to Revolution. (3h) Survey of European history from the fifteenth 
to the eighteenth century. Topics include the voyages of discovery, the military revolution, the 
formation of the modern state, religious reformation, witchcraft and the rise of modem science, 
and pre-industrial economic and social structures including women and the family. 

201 9. General History of Spain. (3h) History of Spain from the pre-Roman period to the present 
day. Counts as elective for the Spanish major. Offered in Salamanca. 

210. Colloquium in Historical Diversity. (3h) Broad examination of the historical roots of contem- 
porary cultural issues through various themes such as race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, 
religion, and nationality. Focus varies with instructor. (CD) 

217. France to 1 774. (3h) History of France from the Paleolithic period to the accession of Louis 
XVI with particular attention to the early modern period. 

218. France since 1815. (3h) History of France from the restoration of the monarchy to the Fifth 
Republic. 

219. Germany to 1 871 . (3h) Social, economic, and political forces leading to the creation of a 
single German nation-state out of over 1,700 sovereign and semi-sovereign German states. 

220. Germany: Unification to Unification, 1871-1990. (3h) The Germans' search for stability and 
unity in a society riven by conflict and on a continent riven by nationalism. 

222. The Renaissance and Reformation. (3h) Europe from 1300 to 1600. Social, cultural, and intel- 
lectual developments stressed. , 

223, 224. Great Britain. (3h, 3h) Survey of British history. Topics include religion, revolution and 
reform, war, poverty and poor relief, women, social and economic change, and empire. 223: To 
eighteenth century; 224: Eighteenth century to present. 

2253. History of Venice. (3h) The history of Venice from its origin to the fall of the Venetian 
Republic. Offered in Venice. 

2260. History of London. (1.5h, 3h) Topographical, social, economic, and political history of Lon- 
don from the earliest times. Lectures, student papers and reports, museum visits and lectures, 
and on-site inspections. Offered in London. 

2263. Venetian Society and Culture. (3h) Examination of Venetian society, including the role 
within Venetian life of music, theatre, the church, and civic ritual. Offered in Venice. 

2280. Georgian and Victorian Society and Culture. (3h) Social and economic transformation of 
England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with particular attention to the rise of pro- 
fessionalism and developments in the arts. Offered in London. 

230. Russia: Origins to 1865. (3h) Survey of the political, social, and economic history of Russia, 
from its origins to the period of the Great Reforms under Alexander II. 

231 . Russia and the Soviet Union: 1865 to the Present. (3h) Survey of patterns of socioeconomic 
change from the late imperial period to the present, the emergence of the revolutionary move- 
ment, and the development of Soviet rule from its establishment to its collapse. 



HISTORY 252 



240. African-American History. (3h) The role of African Americans in the development of the 
U.S., with attention to African heritage, forced migration, Americanization, and influence. (CD) 

242. The Middle East before 1500. (3h) Survey of Middle Eastern history from the rise of Islam to 
the emergence of the last great Muslim unitary states. Provides an overview of political history 
with more in-depth emphasis on the development of Islamic culture and society in the pre- 
modern era. (CD) 

243. The Middle East since 1 500. (3h) Survey of modern Middle Eastern history from the collapse 
of the last great Muslim unitary states to the present day. Topics include the rise and demise of 
the Ottoman and Safvid empires, socio-political reform, the impact of colonialism. Islamic re- 
form, the development of nationalism, and contemporary social and economic challenges. (CD) 

244. Imperial China. (3h) Study of traditional China to 1850, with emphasis on social, cultural, 
and political institutions. (CD) 

245. Modern China. (3h) Study of China from 1644 to the present. (CD) 

246. Japan before 1 800. (3h) Survey of Japan from earliest times to the coming of Western impe- 
rialism, with emphasis on regional ecologies, economic institutions, cultural practice, military 
organization, political ideology, and foreign relations. (CD) 

247. Japan since 1800. (3h) Survey of Japan in the modern world. Topics include political and 
cultural revolution, state and empire-building, economic "miracles," social transformations, 
military conflicts, and intellectual dilemmas. (CD) 

249. Introduction to East Asia. (3h) Introduction to the histories and cultures of East Asia, from 
the earliest times to the present, focusing on China, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam, with some 
attention to the rest of South-East Asia and emphasizing ecology and economy, trade and inter- 
national relations, political ideology, religious belief, and cultural practice. (CD) 

251, 252. The United States. (3h, 3h) Political, social, economic, and intellectual aspects. 251: 
Before 1865; 252: After 1865. 

253. Colonial English America, 1582-1774. (3h) Determinative episodes, figures, allegiances, ap- 
perceptions, and results of the period, organically considered. 

272. Introduction to African History. (3h) Introduction to African history from the perspective of 
the continent as a whole. The historical unity of the African continent and its relation to other 
continents are stressed. (CD) 

273. History of Mexico. (3h) Examination of the history of Mexico from the colonial period to the 
present. (CD) - 

275. Modern Latin America. (3h) Survey of Latin- American history since independence, with 
emphasis on the twentieth century. Concentrates chiefly on economics, politics, and race. (CD) 

284. Latin America's Colonial Past. (3h) Studies the history of Latin America's colonial past from 
the preconquest background to the wars of independence in the early nineteenth century. (CD) 

307. The Italian Renaissance. (3h) Examination of the economic, political, intellectual, artistic, 
and social developments in the Italian world from 1350 to 1550. (CD) 

308. The World of Alexander the Great. (3h) Examination of Alexander the Great's conquests and 
the fusion of Greek culture with those of the Near East, Central Asia, and India. Emphasis is on 



153 



the creation of new political institutions and social customs, modes of addressing philosophical 
and religious issues, and the achievements and limitations of Hellenistic civilization. 

311. Special Topics in History. (lh-3h) Subject varies with instructor. May be repeated for credit if 
topic varies. 

314. European Economic and Social History, 1750-1990. (3h) Changes in Europe's economic struc- 
tures and how they affected Europeans' lives. Emphasizes how economic forces interacted with 
social and institutional factors. 

315. Greek History. (3h) Development of ancient Greek civilization from the Bronze Age to the 
end of the Classical Period stressing social institutions, individual character, and freedom of 
social choice within the framework of cultural, political, and intellectual history. 

316. Rome: Republic and Empire. (3h) Survey of Roman history and civilization from its begin- 
ning to about 500 C.E., with emphasis on the conquest of the Mediterranean world, the evolu- 
tion of the Republican state, the growth of autocracy, the administration of the empire, and the 
interaction between Romans and non-Romans. 

31 7. The French Revolution and Napoleonic Empire. (3h) Revolution and wars that constitute one 
of the pivotal points in modern history. 

318. Weimar Germany. (3h) Art, literature, music, and film of Weimar Germany, 1919-1933, in 
historical context. German or history credit determined at registration. Also listed as GER 331. 

3260. The Industrial Revolution in England. (3h) Study of the social, economic, and political 
causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution in England. Offered in London. 

328. History of the English Common Law, (3h) Study of the origins and development of the Eng- 
lish common law and its legacy to modern legal processes and principles. 

330. Race, Religion, and Sex in Early Modern Europe. (3h) Explores issues of race, ethnicity, and 
gender in Europe between 1400 and 1800. Topics include contact and conflict among Jews, 
Muslims, and Christians; marriage, the family, and sexuality; migration and immigration; and 
slavery and conquest in early European colonies and empires. (CD) 

333. European Diplomacy, 1848-1914. (3h) The diplomacy of the great powers, with some atten- 
tion given to the role of publicity in international affairs. Topics include the unification of Italy 
and of Germany, the Bismarckian system, and the coming of World War I. 

337. Gender in Early America. (3h) History of gender roles from the colonial period to the mid- 
nineteenth century. Examines the social constructions of femininity and masculinity and their 
political and cultural significance. (CD) 

338. Gender in Modern America. (3h) History of gender relations from the late nineteenth cen- 
tury to the present. Analyzes the varying definitions of femininity and masculinity, the chang- 
ing notions of sexuality, and the continuity and diversity of gender roles with special attention 
to race, class, and ethnicity. 

339. Health Care in American Society. (3h) Analysis of major trends in health, sickness, and 
disease within the broad context of social, political, and economic developments. Examines 
indigenous healing; colonial medicine; emergence of hospitals and asylums; public health; race, 
class, and gender issues; and natural versus high-tech approaches to health care in the twen- 
tieth century. 



154 



341 . Africans in the Atlantic World, 1 750-1 81 5. (3h) Explores Africans' experience in the Atlantic 
world (Africa, Europe, and the Americas) during the era of slave trade by examining their en- 
counters with Indians and Europeans and their adjustment to slave traders in West Africa. (CD) 

342. Islamic Empires Compared: the Ottomans, Safavids, and Mughals. (3h) Examines, in a 
comparative way, central themes in the history of the three great Islamic empires of the early 
modern period (1400-1800). Considers the problem of political legitimacy faced by Muslim rul- 
ers, transformations in Islamic religious practices, and the relationship between war and other 
aspects of Islamic society and culture. (CD). 

343. Nation, Faith, and Gender in the Middle East. (3h) Traces the development of nationalism 
and its interaction with religious, transnational, and gender identities in the Middle East in the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include Zionism, Arabism, Turkish nationalism, and 
Islamic revivalism. (CD) 

347. Japan since World War II. (3h) Survey of Japanese history since the outbreak of the Pacific 
War, with emphasis on social and cultural developments. Topics may include occupation and 
recovery of independence, the "1955 System," high-growth economics, and the problems of 
prosperity in recent years. (CD) 

349. American Foundations. (3h) Lnterdisciplinary study of American art, music, literature, and 
social history with particular reference to the art collection at Reynolda House Museum of 
American Art. Lectures, discussions, and field trips, including a tour of New York City muse- 
ums. Term project in American history. Also listed as ART 331, HON 393, 394, and MUS 307. 
Ojfered at Reynolda House in summer only. 

350. Global Economic History. (3h) Overview of the growth and development of the world 
economy from precapitalist organizations to the present system of developed and under- 
developed states. (CD) 

351 . U.S. Social History I. (3h) Examines various aspects of American social history from the 
colonial period to the mid-nineteenth century, with emphasis on immigration, ethnicity, race, 
gender, sexuality, the family, religion, and life and culture. 

352. U.S. Social History II. (3h) Examines various aspects of American social history from the 
late-nineteenth century to the present, with emphasis on immigration, ethnicity, race, gender, 
sexuality, the family, religion, and life and culture. 

354. Revolutionary and Early National America, 1763-1815. (3) The American Revolution, its 
causes and effects, the Confederation, the Constitution, and the new nation. 

356. Jacksonian America, 1815-1850. (3h) The U.S. in the age of Jackson, Clay, Calhoun, and 
Webster. A biographical approach. 

357. The Civil War and Reconstruction. (3h) The political and military events of the war and the 
economic, social, and political readjustments which followed. 

358. The U.S. from Reconstruction to World War I. (1.5h, 3h) National progress and problems dur- 
ing an era of rapid industrialization. May be divided into halves for 1.5 hours each: the Gilded 
Age; the Progressive Era. 



155 



359. U.S. History from Gilded Age Prosperity to Depression. (3h) Political, social, and economic 
history of the U.S. from 1877 to 1933 with emphasis on industrialization, urbanization, immi- 
gration, growth of Big Business, imperialism. Populism, Progressive reform, war depression, 
and race, class, and gender relations. 

360. U.S. History since the New Deal. (3h) Political, social, and econorruc history of the U.S. since 
1933 with emphasis on the Depression, wars at home and abroad, unionism, civil rights move- 
ments, countercultures, environmentalism, religion, the Imperial Presidency, and liberalism and 
conservatism. 

361. Economic History of the U.S. (3h) The economic development of the U.S. from colonial 
beginnings to the present. 

362. American Constitutional History. (3h) Origins of the Constitution, the controversies in- 
volving the nature of the Union, and constitutional readjustments to meet the new American 
industrialism. 

363. The Old South. (3h) Examination of the origins of southern distinctiveness, from the first 
interactions of Europeans, Native Americans and Africans to the Civil War and Emancipation. 
(CD) 

364. The New South. (3h) Examination of sharecropptng, segregation, political reform, the 
Sunbelt phenomenon, the Civil Rights Movement, and southern religion, music, and literature. 
Includes a service learning component. (CD) 

366. Studies in Historic Preservation. (3h) Analysis of history museums and agencies and of the 
techniques of preserving and interpreting history through artifacts, restorations, and recon- 
structions. P — POI. 

369. Modern Military History. (3h) Making war in the modem era, with special attention to the 
social context of military activity. Credit not allowed for both HST 369 and MIL 229. 

370. Topics in North Carolina History. (3h) General chronological survey of North Carolina with 
emphasis on selected topics. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. 

371 . Winston-Salem/Forsyth County. (3h) History of the Winston-Salem /Forsyth County area 
using techniques of local history including archives, museums, and oral history. Lectures, read- 
ings, and class projects. 

374. Protest and Rebellion in Latin America. (3h) Study of the history of protest movements and 
rebellions in Latin America from primitive and agrarian revolts to mass working class and 
socialist organizations. (CD) 

376. Civil Rights and Black Consciousness Movements. (3h) A social and religious history of the 
African- American struggle for citizenship rights and freedom from World War II to the present. 
Also listed as REL 341. (CD) 

3760. Anglo-American Relations since 1940. (3h) Study of the relations between the U.S. and 
Britain from 1940 to the present. Offered in London. 

377. American Diplomatic History. (3h) Introduction to the history of American diplomacy since 
1776, emphasizing the effects of public opinion on fundamental policies. 

378. Reconciling Race. (3h) Comparative history of twentieth-century racial oppression, black 
rebellion, and religious reconciliation. Also listed as REL 348. (CD) 

HISTORY 25g 



379. Origins of The Americas. (3h) Unified, comparative history of North, Central, and South 
America from ancient times to the present. (CD) 

380. America at Worlc. (3h) Examines the people who built America from 1750 to 1945. Themes 
include free labor versus slave labor, the impact of industrialization, the racial and gendered 
realities of work, and the growth of organized labor and its political repercussions. (CD) 

383. Revolution and Culture in Latin America. (3h) Explores the links between revolutionary 
movements and cultural expression in Latin America and the Caribbean. Includes a Language 
Across the Curriculum component that allows students to earn credits in Spanish by reading 
and discussing at least half of the texts in Spanish. (CD) 

390. Research Seminar. (3h) Offered by members of the faculty on topics of their choice. A paper 
is required. 

391 . Honors Seminar. (3h) Seminar on problems of historical synthesis and interpretation. 
Honors students must take HST 391. P— POL 

392. Individual Research. (3h) Writing of a major research paper. May be taken in lieu of HST 390 
in pursuit of honors in history. P — POL 

397. Historical Writing Tutorial. (1.5h) Individual supervision of historical writing to improve a 
project initiated in HST 390 or HST 392. Does not count toward major or minor requirements. 
P— POL 

398. Individual Study. (l-3h) Project in an area of study not otherwise available in the depart- 
ment; permitted upon departmental approval of petition presented by a qualified student. 

399. Directed Reading. (l-3h) Concentrated reading in an area of study not otherwise available. 
May be repeated for credit if topic varies. P — POL 



Humanities (HMN) 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 

Coordinator William S. Hamilton 

W.R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Humanities Allen Mandelbaum 

Reynolds Professor of American Studies Maya Angelou 

Professor Ulrike Wiethaus 

Associate Professors Candyce Leonard, Robert L. Utiey Jr. 

In order to offer capable students a forum which encourages the pursuit of ideas across the 
disciplinary lines of such fields as history, philosophy, literature, politics, religion, and the arts, 
the minor is offered in humanities. It requires a total of fifteen hours. Candidates for the minor 
are required to take HMN 280. Reason and Revelation, and 290. Innovation and Inclusivity. 
When these have been passed, the student is assigned a minor adviser who assists in planning 
the rest of the student's curriculum. In accordance with the plan, six more hours are selected 
from courses in the humanities or related disciplines other than those being used by the student 
to fulfill divisional requirements of the College or the requirements of the major. 



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The minor concludes with a three-hour project in HMN 396 supervised by a member of the 
humanities faculty and reviewed by a committee of relevant faculty appointed by the coordi- 
nator of humanities; the project must represent the further pursuit of an idea or topic studied 
in one of the courses of the minor, and must successfully reflect the synthesis of views from at 
least two traditional disciplines. 

170. Understanding Japan. (3h) Understanding Japanese culture and behavior from the struc- 
ture of social units such as family educational institutions, and sports, artistic, and professional 
organizations. Credit not given for both HMN 170 and 175. (CD) 

1 75. Japanese Culture: Insight and Outreach. (3h) Develops an understanding of Japanese culture 
through reading, class discussion, and individual research, with subsequent outreach to area 
high schools through presentations. Credit not given for both HMN 170 and 175. (CD) 

1 767. The Cuisine of Italy: From the Farm to the Tabletop. (3h) Interdisciplinary study of the 
science, economics, history, culture, and art of Italian cuisine. Taught only in Venice, 2005. 

Humanities courses 213-223 are designed to introduce students to works of literature which would not 
be included in their normal course of study. Each course includes a reading in translation often to twelve 
representative authors. 

21 3. Studies in European Literature. (3h) Texts studied are by such authors as Dante, Montaigne, 
Cervantes, Goethe, Dostoevsky, and Camus. 

214. Contemporary Fiction. (3h) Texts studied are by such authors as Mann, Sartre, Unamuno, 
Fuentes, Moravia, and Voinovich. 

215. Germanic and Slavic Literature. (3h) Texts studied are by such authors as Von Eschenbach, 
Hoffmann, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Ibsen, and Kafka. 

216. Romance Literature. (3h) Texts studied are by such authors as Boccaccio, Calderon, Flau- 
bert, Machado de Assis, Gide, and Lampedusa. 

217. European Drama. (3h) Texts studied are by such authors as Moliere, Garcia Lorca, Piran- 
dello, Schiller, Brecht, Ibsen, and Beckett. (CD) 

218. Eastern European Literature. (3h) Texts studied are by such authors as Moricz, Hasek, 
Bulgakov, Andric, Gombrowicz, Kundera, Ugresic, and Erofeev. (CD) 

219. Introduction to Japanese Literature. (3h) Major works of poetry, drama, and fiction from the 
classical and modem periods. Also listed as EAL 219. 

221 . Introduction to Chinese Literature. (3h) Readings and discussions in fiction, drama, and 
poetry from the traditional and modem periods. Also listed as EAL 221. 

222. African and Caribbean Literature. (3h) Examination of the negritude movement and the 
negro- African novel. Texts studied are by such authors as Aime Cesaire, Leopold Senghor, 
Ousmane Sembene, and Mariama Ba. (CD) 

223. Contemplative Practices and Literary Creation. (3h) An introduction to contemplative read- 
ing in the western monastic tradition, its development in the Middle Ages, and its influence 
on intellectual life and non-religious literary creation until the twentieth century, with a focus 
on Spain. 



HUMANITIES 



158 



2248. Cross-cultural Encounters in Morocco. (3h) Interdisciplinary study of Moroccan culture, 
both past and present, and an introduction to a country whose history and geo-political 
situation are unique within the Arab region. Group excursions to sites of cultural and historic 
significance. Offered in Fez, Morocco, during the summer session. 

2253. Literature, Travel, and Discovery. (3h) Exploration of various works, primarily in transla- 
tion, from Homer to the present that focuses on the relationship between travel and discovery, 
especially as travel establishes the ongoing connection between the sacred and the profane for 
both guest and host. 

2287. Viennese Culture from 1 860 to 1 91 4. (3h) A study of late nineteenth and early twentieth 
century Vienna as reflected in the matrix of the city's civic and artistic life. Offered in Vienna. 

230. Women Writers in Contemporary Italy. (3h) Readings and discussions of texts by women 
writers in post-fascist Italy that reflect the feminine perspective on issues in contemporary 
Italian society and society at large. Authors include Naraini, Morante, Fallaci, Ginzburg, 
deCespedes, and Ortese. (Qualifies, with modifications, for the minor in Italian.) 

235. After Auschwitz: Holocaust Literature, Art, and Theology. (3h) Survey of the ways in which 
novelists, poets, theologians, and culture critics have struggled to come to terms with the 
cataclysmic events of the Shoah. Considers textual, visual, and architectural responses such as 
poetry, films, memorials, and paintings. 

245. Interdisciplinary Seminar in Critical Thinking. (1.5h) Investigation of cross-disciplinary 
issues. Designed to encourage experimental, interdisciplinary thinking and writing. 

250. Maritime Studies. (3h) Provides a multidisciplinary study of the sea and sea voyage in the 
Western tradition and the role of the sea in the historical development of the modern world 
system of labor, trade, and scientific resource management. Offered only in conjunction with the 
Sea Education Association. 

251. The Asian-American Experience: Literature and Personal Narratives. (3h) Introduction to the 
writings and narratives of Asian Americans, examining the process of assimilation, the effects 
of immigration and cultural conflict on literary forms of expression, and the formation of new 
cultural identities. (CD) 

252. Introduction to Chinese Film. (3h) Introductory study of film from mainland China, Hong 
Kong, and Taiwan from its inception at the turn of the twentieth century to the present. Ex- 
plores Chinese film as an art form, an instrument of political propaganda, and a medium of 
popular entertainment. Also listed as EAL 252. 

2561. Beijing: A Study of Chinese Religion and Politics. (3h) Study of the religion and politics in 
the recent history of China, beginning with the founding of present Beijing in the early Ming 
Dynasty. 

265. Gender, Spirituality, and Art. (3h) Introduction to the current discussion of the nature of art 
and spiritual experience, with special attention to definitions of femininity and masculinity in 
the construction of symbols and religious meaning. 

266. Perceptions of Islam. (3h) Exploration of Islam as understood by Muslims and non- 
Muslims, with particular focus on issues of war and peace, gender equity, himian rights, and 
prospects for future relations between Islamic and Western countries. (CD) 



159 



HUMANITIES 



267. China, Character, and Columbine. (3h) An examination, in Eastern and Western terms, of 
methodologies used to form and to reform the configurations of innate and learned factors that 
produce saints or sociopaths, centering on the psychological theory of Yan Xi-zhai. (CD) 

268. Ancestors, Indians, Immigrants: A Southwest Cultural Tapestry. (3h) Exploration of factors 
that shaped the lives of people in the Southwest with attention to Native American and Hispan- 
ic experience. From kivas to casinos, coyotes to cartels, it links archaeological and prehispanic 
history to contemporary lifeways in the canyons, deserts, and cities of the U.S. /North Mexico. 
Also listed as ANT 377. (CD) 

280. Reason and Revelation. (3h) Investigation of the intellectual roots of Western civilization as 
they are found in the emergence of philosophical universalism and Biblical monotheism. These 
distinctive approaches are considered through the reading of such authors as Plato, Hesiod, 
Aristophanes, and St. Thomas Aquinas, and of selections from the Bible. 

282. Public Life and the Liberal Arts. (3h) Devoted to topics of abiding public significance. Fimda- 
mental dilemmas and resolutions associated with each topic are examined through a consid- 
eration of their treatment in the liberal arts tradition. "Politics and the Arts" and "Theory and 
Practice in Public Life" are representative topics. 

283. Foundations of Revolution in Modernity. (3h) Subject viewed through such representative 
writers as Machiavelli, Spinoza, Pascal, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Flaubert, Eckermann, Hegel, 
Nietzsche, and Conrad, each of whom in a different way participated in the rejection of the 
teachings of both the Socratic tradition and the Christian church. 

285. Culture and Religion in Contemporary Native America. (3h) Interdisciplinary survey of 
American-Indian cultures, including the arts and literature, religions, and historical changes. 
Emphasis is on the impact of the Conquista, encounters with Northern Atlantic societies, and 
contemporary developments. Also listed as REL 265. (CD) 

290. Innovation and Inclusivity. (3h) Introduction to cultural innovation in the twentieth century. 
Written texts, visual arts, and performance art are analyzed through the perspectives of (1.) 
paradigms such as psychoanalysis, Marxism, feminism, and liberation theology, (2.) debates 
about political correctness and multiculturalism, and (3.) strategies used by minority and non- 
Western voices. (CD) 

320. Perspectives on the Middle Ages. (3h) Team-taught interdisciplinary course using a variety 
of literary, historical, and theoretical materials to examine one of the following: (a.) Medieval 
Women; (b.) Medieval Constructs of Gender, Race, and Class; (c.) Love and War in the Middle 
Ages; (d.) The Medieval Environment: Landscape and Culture. May be repeated for credit with 
different sub topics. 

332. Humanities Perspectives on Contemporary Indigenous Cultures. (3h) An interdisciplinary 
seminar on the emerging global presence of indigenous cultures. Topics include world views 
and interreligious dialogue, contemporary social, political, and environmental developments, 
and indigenous cultural representation in contemporary arts, including film, literature, and 
theatre. (CD) 

337. World Poetry in Dramatic Performance. (1.5h) Study, in tianslation, of ancient and contem- 
porary poetry ranging from Japanese to Irish, African American, Spanish, German, Scottish, 
and others. Students are required, after eight class meetings, to perform in a public presenta- 
tion. Pass /Fail only. 



HUMANITIES 



160 



3421. Japan in Perspective. (3h) Readings in accounts of Japan by Western visitors from the nine- 
teenth century to the present, e.g., Hearn, Bird, Booth, Reid, and writing of reflective essays on 
student responses to their experiences with Japan and Japanese culture. Taught only in Japan. 

3503. Postmodern Experimental Fiction. (3h) Explores a number of experimental fictions that 
helped define our idea of the novel in the second half of the twentieth century. Assesses the 
implications of the various revisions in literary form and links them, where possible, to general 
changes in thought as the world became increasingly globalized. 

353. African and Caribbean Women Writers. (3h) Critical analysis of fiction by female authors 
whose works concern women in Africa and its Caribbean diaspora. 

355. Forms and Expressions of Love. (3h) Philosophical, religious, and psychological delineations 
of the forms of love; literary, dramatic, musical, and visual portrayals of love in selected works 
of art. Also listed as HON 249. 

357. images of Aging in the Humanities. (3h) Multidisciplinary presentation and discussion 
of portrayals of aging in selected materials from several of the liberal arts: philosophical and 
religious perspectives; selections from literature and the visual arts; historical development of 
perceptions of aging; imaging of aging in contemporary culture. Also listed as HON 257. 

361. Dante I. (1.5h) Study of the Vita Nuova as apprenticeship to the Divina Commedia, and of 
the first half of the Divina Commedia as epic, prophecy, autobiography, and poetry, relating it to 
antiquity, Christianity, Dante's European present (the birth of modem languages and new intel- 
lectual and poetic forms), and Dante's own afterlife in the West. Also listed as ENG 307. 

362. Dante II. (1.5h) Study of the second half of the Divina Commedia as epic, prophecy, auto- 
biography, and poetry, relating it to antiquity, Christianity, Dante's European present (the birth 
of modem languages and new intellectual and poetic forms), and Dante's own afterlife in the 
West. Also listed as ENG 308. P— HMN 361 or POI. 

365. Humanity and Nature. (3h) Multidisciplinary exploration of relations of human beings to 
nature, and of scientific, economic, and political factors in current environmental concerns. 
Selected religious, classical, and philosophical texts; works of visual art; selected discussions of 
ecology and human responsibility. Also listed as HON 265. 

380. Literature, Film, and Society. (3h) Study of major selected works of literature, mainly Ameri- 
can; of the films which have been based upon them; and of the social and political context in 
which they were read and seen. Texts include novels, stories, and plays by such writers as Drei- 
ser, Lewis, Warren, Steinbeck, Hellman, Harper Lee, Wright, and Walker. P — Junior standing. 

381. Independent Research in Asian Studies. (Ih, 2h, 3h) Supervised independent research 
project on a topic related to Asia. Requires the approval of both the instructor and the coordina- 
tor of East Asian studies. May be repeated for credit, but no more than three hours may count 
toward East Asian studies. 

382. Italian Cinema and Society. (3h) Survey of some of Italy's greatest postwar films, with 
special attention to issues and problems in Italian society as treated by major directors such as 
Fellini, DeSica, Rossellini, Antonioni, and Olmi. 

383. Italian Fascism in Novels and Films. (3h) Exploration of theories of fascism, with emphasis 
on Italy between 1919 and 1944 as understood through novels and films. 



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HUMANITIES 



385. Legends of Troy. (3h) Interdisciplinary investigation of translations and transformations of 
the Trojan legend from the Greeks through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance to the pres- 
ent. Texts, studied in English translation, are by such authors as Homer, Virgil, Ovid, Chaucer, 
Racine, and Giraudoux. 

390. Interdisciplinary Seminar on Aging. (1.5h or 3h) Study of aging in an interdisciplinary con- 
text, including the biological, psychological, neurobiological, cognitive, health status, and social 
structural and demographic aspects of aging. P — POL 

396. Individual Study. (Ih, 2h, 3h) Individual projects in the humanities which continue study 
begun in regular courses. By prearrangement. 



Interdisciplinary Honors (HON) 

Coordinator Professor of English Barry Maine 

A series of seminar courses of an interdisciplinary nature is open to qualified undergraduates. 
Students interested in admission to any one of these seminars should consult the coordinator. 

Students who choose to participate in as many as four interdisciplinary seminars and who 
have a superior record may elect HON 281, directed study culminating in an honors paper 
and an oral examination. Those whose work has been superior in this course and who have 
achieved an overall grade point average of at least 3.0 in all college work may be graduated 
with the distinction "Honors in the Arts and Sciences." Students who choose to be candidates 
for departmental honors may not also be candidates for "Honors in the Arts and Sciences." 

Able students are normally encouraged to choose a departmental honors program rather 
than "Honors in the Arts and Sciences." As a result, most students elect to participate in only 
one or two interdisciplinary seminars in which they are particularly interested. The faculty 
participants for these seminars represent diverse academic disciplines. 

1 31 , 1 32. Approaches to Human Experience I. (3h, 3h) Inquiry into the nature and interrelation- 
ships of several approaches to man's experience, represented by the work of three such minds 
as Leonardo da Vinci, Dante, Klee, Lorenz, Confucius, Dostoevsky, Descartes, Goya, Mozart, 
Jefferson, and Bohr. Seminar discussion based on primary and secondary sources, including 
musical works and paintings. Written reports and a term paper required. Offered in alternate years. 

1 33, 1 34. Approaches to Human Experience II. (3h, 3h) A parallel course to HON 131, 132, 
concentrating on the work of a different set of figures such as Einstein, GaUleo, Keynes, Pascal, 
Camus, Picasso, Ibsen, Stiavinsky, Sophocles, and Bach. Offered in alternate years. 

236. The Force of Impressionism. (3h) Impressionism and its impact on modem painting and 
literature, with attention to origins and theories of style. Painters include Manet, Monet, Renoir, 
Degas, and Cezanne. Writers include Baudelaire, Flaubert, Mallarme, James, Pound, Joyce, and 
WooIL 

237. The Scientific Outlook. (3h) Exploration of the origins and development of the scientific 
method and some of its contemporary applications in the natural and social sciences and the 
humanities. 



INTERDISCIPLINARY HONORS 



162 



238. Romanticism. (3h) Romanticism as a recurrent characteristic of mind and art and as a 
specific historical movement in Europe and America in the late eighteenth and nineteenth 
centuries. Emphasis on primary materials in philosophy, literature, music, and painhng. 

240. Adventures in Self-Understanding. (3h) Examination and discussion of significant accounts 
of the quest for understanding of the self, in differing historical periods, cultural contexts, and 
genres. Among figures who may be discussed are Augustine, Dante, Gandhi, Montaigne, Des- 
cartes, Pascal, and selected modern writers. 

241 . The Tragic View. (3h) The theory of tragedy in ancient and modern times; the expression of 
the tragic in literature, art, music, theatre, and film. 

242. The Comic View. (3h) The theory of comedy in ancient and modern times; the expression of 
the comic in literature, art, music, theatre, and film. 

244. Man and the Structure of the Universe. (3h) Investigation of various conceptions of the 
universe and their implications for man. Stiady not necessarily limited to the cosmologies of 
Ptolemy, Copernicus, and their modern successors, but may also include theories such as the 
Babylonian, Mayan, and Taoist. 

247. The Mythic View. (3h) The nature of myth through creation and hero myths; the uses to 
which myths have been put in different historical periods; various modem explanations of 
myth (literary, religious, anthropological, psychoanalytic, social, and historical). 

248. The Ironic View. (3h) Investigation of the ironic view of life in literature, art, history, theatre, 
and film. 

249. Forms and Expressions of Love. (3h) Philosophical, religious, and psychological delineations 
of the forms of love; literary, dramatic, musical, and visual portrayals of love in selected works 
of art. Also listed as HMN 355. 

257. Images of Aging in the Humanities. (3h) Multidisciplinary presentation and discussion 
of porti-ayals of aging in selected materials from several of the liberal arts: philosophical and 
religious perspectives; selections from literahire and the visual arts; historical development of 
perceptions of aging; imaging of aging in contemporary culture. Also listed as liMN 357. 

258. Venice in Art and Literature. (3h) Exploration of what Venice has meant to non-native artists 
and writers, and what they have made of it. Artists and writers include Byron, Turner, Ruskin, 
Henry James, Sargent, Whistier, Proust, Mann, and others. 

265. Humanity and Nature. (3h) Multidisciplinary exploration of relations of human beings to 
natiire, and of scientific, economic, and political factors in current envirormiental concerns. 
Selected religious, classical, and philosophical texts; works of visual art; selected discussions of 
ecology and human responsibility. Also listed as HMN 365. 

281. Directed Study. (3h) Readings on an interdisciplinary topic and presentation of a major 
research or interpretive paper based on these readings, under the direction of a faculty mem- 
ber; an oral examination on the topic. Eligible students must submit a written request to the 
coordinator of interdisciplinary honors by the end of the junior year. Not open to candidates for 
departmental honors. 

310. The Medieval World: Special Topics. (3h) Team-taught course spanning the Middle Ages 
(500-1500) which considers artistic and/or literary representations and texts in the context of 



163 



INTERDISCIPLINARY HONORS 



political, historical, or religious culture of the medieval period in Western and non-Western 
areas of the world. Specific content is determined by the individual instructors. 

390. Postmodern Thought and Expression. (3h) Exploration of postmodern philosophy, litera- 
ture, and art, beginning with Nietzsche, Foucault, and Derrida, and extending into experiments 
in literature and art of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. 

393, 394. American Foundations I, II. (3h, 3h) Interdisciplinary study of American art, music, 
literature, and social history with particular reference to the art collection at Reynolda House 
Museum of American Art. Lectures, discussions and field trips, including a tour of New York 
City museums. Term project in American Art. Also listed as ART 331, HST 349, and MUS 307. 
English majors enrolled in HON 393, 394 may receive credit for ENG 302 so long as the term 
project is in American literature. Ojfered at Reynolda House in summer only. 



International Development and Policy 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 

Director Zacharyl. Smith Associate Professor of Economics Sylvain H. Boko 

The minor in international development and policy emphasizes the study of the major contend- 
ing theories and approaches to international development and their relationship to development- 
related policies in both rich and poor nations. The minor enables students to acquire critical 
skills of evaluation of the decisions and actions of the major multilateral institutions and their 
impacts on developing countries' policy choices. Students interested in understanding world is- 
sues such as poverty, debt, the environment, women in development, hunger, and conflict stand 
to benefit from this minor. The minor consists of fifteen credits. The required courses are IDP 
150, ECN 201, 258, and 271, yielding nine credits. The remaining six credits are received from an 
approved list of elective courses. 

Required Courses: Please note the prerequisites for each course. 

IDP 150. Introduction to International Development. (3h) Evaluation of the major contending 
theories of international development. The role of major multilateral institutions in policy 
choices. Critical analysis of current international development issues such as poverty reduction, 
debt, sustainability, women in development, population growth, hunger, and health and educa- 
tion. Fall. P— ECN 150. 

ECN 201 . Economic Data Analysis. (1.5 h) — See catalog description. P — ECN 150. 

ECN 258. Economic Growth and Development. (3h) See catalog description. P — ECN 205 or POL 

ECN 271. Selected Areas in Economics. (1.5h) Study tour of the World Bank. P— POL 

Elective courses: Take 6 hours from the following elective courses. Students should contact the 
director for the most current list of courses that count toward the minor. 

ANT 301. Free Trade, Fair Trade: Independent Entrepreneurships in the 
Global Market. (3h) 



INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND POLICY 



164 



ANT (cont.) 334. Peoples and Cultures of South Asia. (3h) 
337 Economic Anthropology. (3h) 
342. Development Wars: Applied Anthropology. (3h) 
383, 384. Field Program in Cultural Anthropology (3h) 
BUS 215. Seminar in Comparative Management. (1.5h, 3h) 
222. Global Marketing Strategy. (3h) 
234. International Finance. (3h) 
290. International Business Study Tour. (3h) 
ECN 251. kiternational Trade. (3h) 

252. International Finance. (3h) 

253. Economies in Transition. (3h) 

254. Current Issues in African Development. (3h) 
Summer study abroad in Benin. 

HMN 2248. Cross-cultural Encounters in Morocco. (3h) Study abroad in Fez. 
INS 260. Introduction to Global Trade and Commerce Studies. (3h) 
LAS 210. Introduction to Latin- American Studies. (3h) 
POL 238. Comparative Economic Development and Political Change. (3h) 
246. Politics and Policies in South Asia. (3h) 

I 253. International Political Economy. (3h) 

255. Group Identity in International Relations. (3h) 
262. International Organizations. (3h) 

264. Moral Dilemmas in International Politics. (3h) 
SOC 363. Global Capitalism. (3h) 

International Studies (INS) 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 
Coordinator Associate Professor of Political Science Pia Christina Wood 

The minor in international studies consists of a total of fifteen hours which must include 
INS 250. Seminar in International Studies and twelve additional hours from approved interna- 
tional courses. Of the twelve additional hours, students must take two courses from each of the 
two categories: Global Thematic Studies and Regional Studies. No more than six of the fifteen 
hours for the minor may be taken from a single discipline. It is strongly recommended that 
INS 250 be taken in either the fall or spring semester of the senior year, but it must follow 
completion of the other aforementioned requirements. 

1 . Global Thematic Studies: Two courses preferably selected from a single category. 

a. cultural studies 

b. socio-economic studies 

c. geopolitical studies 

2. Regional Studies: Two courses, preferably selected from a single region. 

a. Africa d. Latin America 

b. Asia e. Middle East f 

c. Europe 



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INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



The international studies minor is designed to prepare students to operate in an increasingly 
globalized world whose defining traits are a myriad of transnational challenges and opportuni- 
ties. The minor exposes students to a variety of transregional themes and subjects on one hand 
and particular knowledge of specific regions on the other. Study of a foreign language beyond 
the basic requirements is strongly recommended, as is study abroad. For more information 
contact the Center for International Studies. 

The current list of approved courses is available in the Center for International Studies and 
on its Web site. Additional elective courses may have been approved since publication of this 
bulletin. The program coordinator maintains a complete list of aU approved elective courses. 
For course descriptions, see the relevant department's listings in this publication. 

140. United Nations/Model United Nations. (1.5h) Exploration of the history, structure, and func- 
tions of the United Nations including current economic, social, and political issues. In-depth 
analysis of one country in the UN and attendance at the Model UN Conference. May be taken 
twice for credit. Pass /Fail only. 

260. Introduction to Global Trade and Commerce Studies. (3h) Provides foundational knowledge 
in global trade and commerce. Focuses on understanding the global environment and the vari- 
ety of issues associated with global trade and commerce. 

228. Individual Study. (Ih, 2h, 3h) Intensive research leading to the completion of an individual 
project conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. Students are responsible for initi- 
ating the project and securing permission of an appropriate faculty member. P — POL 

229. Internship in International Studies. (Ih, 2h, 3h) Field work directly related to international 
issues in a public or private setting under the supervision of a faculty member. Related readings 
and an analytical paper are minimum requirements. Students are responsible for initiating the 
project and securing the permission of an appropriate instructor. P — POL 

250. Seminar in International Studies. (3h) Applies theoretical assumptions and methods to the 
analysis of international issues of contemporary relevance. (CD) 

349. Japanese and American Culture: Cross-Cultural Communication. (3h) Exploration of com- 
munication differences between the Japanese and the Americans. Japanese and American 
values, behavior, and beliefs are compared in determining effective methods for cross-cultural 
communication. Emphasis is on examining factors leading to miscommunication and the 
development of techniques for overcoming cultural barriers. Credit not given for both INS 349 
and COM 351A. Also listed as COM 351A. (CD) 

363. Global Capitalism. (3h) Analysis of changing patterns of industrial organization, market, 
and labor relations, and institutional frameworks that have resulted from the growth of an 
integrated global capitalist economy. Also listed as SOC 363. 

Thefollmving course does not count for the minor but is designed to ensure that students who study 
overseas receive sufficient credit to make satisfactory progress toward graduation: INS 101. 

1 01 . Overseas Study. (l-3h) Directed reading and/or field work as part of an approved overseas 
program under the supervision of the program coordinator or the Center for International 
Studies. The keeping of a journal and submission of an end of program evaluation are required. 
P— POL 



INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



166 



Global Thematic Studies 

Two courses (preferably selected from a single category). Categories include cultural studies 
(religion, music, and literature), socio-economic studies, and geopolitical studies. 

Cultural Studies 

ANT 330. Seeing World Cultures. (3h) 

336. Myth, Ritual, and Symbolism. (3h) 

355. Language and Culture. (3h) 

383, 384. Field Program in Cultural Anthropology (3h) 
ART 260. Classics of World Cinema. (3h) 

299. International Studies in Art. (3h) 
COM 350. Intercultural Communication. (3h) 

351. Comparative Communication. (1.5h, 3h) 

354. International Communication. (3h) 
ENG 358. Postcolonial Literature. (3h) 

359. Studies in Postcolonial Literature. (3h) 
HMN 266. Perceptions of Islam. (3h) 

290. Innovation and Inclusivity. (3h) 

332. Humanities Perspectives on Contemporary Indigenous Cultures (3h) 
INS 349. Japanese and American Culture: Cross-Cultural Communication. (3h) 
MUS 209. Music of World Cultures. (3h) 
PSY 357. Cross-Cultural Psychology. (3h) 
REL 273. World Religions in Dialogue. (3h) 

346. Pentecostalism in Global Perspective. (3h) 

347. The Emerging Church in the Two-Thirds World. (3h) 

360. World Religions. (3h) 

361. The Buddhist World of Thought and Practice. (3h) 

362. Islam. (3h) 

381. Zen Buddhism. (3h) 
SPN 352. Contemporary Theatre in Spain and Spanish America. (3h) 

364. Transgressing Borders: Identity in Latin America and 
U.S. Latino Cultures. (3h) 
THE 374. Contemporary World Drama. (3h) 

Socio-economic Studies 

ANT 337. Economic Anthropology. (3h) 
BUS 215. Seminar in Comparative Management. (3h) 

222. Global Marketing Strategy (3h) 

234. International Finance. (3h) 

290. International Business Study Tour. (3h) 
ECN 251. hiternational Trade. (3h) 

252. International Finance. (3h) 

253. Economies in Transition. (3h) 

258. Economic Growth and Development. (3h) 
HST 350. Global Economic History. (3h) 
INS 363. Global Capitalism. (3h) 

POL 239. State, Economy, and International Competitiveness. (3h) 
SOC 363. Global Capitalism. (3h) 



167 



INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



Geopolitical Studies 

EDU 271. Geography: The Human Environment. (3h) 

HST 369. Modern Military History. (3h) 

POL 237. Comparative Public Policy in Selected Industrialized Democracies. (3h) 

238. Comparative Economic Development and Political Change. (3h) 

245. Ethnonarionalism. (3h) 

247. Islam and Politics. (3h) 

253. International Political Economy. (3h) 

255. Group Identity in International Relations. (3h) 

256. International Security. (3h) 

261. International Law. (3h) 

262. International Organizations. (3h) 

264. Moral Dilemmas in International Politics. (3h) 

Regional Studies 

Two courses preferably selected from a single region. Regions include Africa, Asia, Europe, 
Latin America, and the Middle East. 



Africa 



Asia 



ECN 254. Current Issues in African Development. (3h) 
HST 272. Introduction to African History. (3h) 
HMN 2248. Cross-cultural Encounters in Morocco. (3h) 

353. African and Caribbean Women Writers. (3h) 
POL 242. Topics in Comparative Politics. (3h) 

252. Topics in International Politics. (Ih or 3h) 
REL 339. Religion, Society, and Power in Africa. (3h) 

ANT 334. Peoples and Cultures of South Asia. (3h) 
CHI 350. Chinese Modem Literature Survey. (3h) 
EAL 170. Understanding Japan. (3h) 

175. Japanese Culture: Insight and Outreach. (3h) 

300. Independent Research in East Asian Studies. (Ih, 2h, 3h) 
EAS 311. Special Topics in Asian Studies. (l-3h) 

381. Independent Research in Asian Studies. (l-3h) 
HST 244. Imperial China. (3h) 

245. Modern China. (3h) 

247. Japan since 1800. (3h) 

249. Introduction to East Asia. (3h) 

347. Japan since World War II. (3h) 
HMN 170. Understanding Japan. (3h) 

252. Introduction to Chinese Film. (3h) 

2561. Beijing: A Study of Chinese Religion and Politics. (3h) 

267. China, Character, and Columbine. (3h) 
JPN 350. Japanese Modern Literature Survey I. (3h) 
PHI 350. The Main Streams of Chinese Philosophy and Religion. (3h) 
POL 246. Polihcs and Policies in South Asia. (3h) 

248. Chinese Politics. (3h) 

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES ^68 



REL 363. The Religions of Japan. (3h) 

380. The Main Streams of Chinese Philosophy and Religion. (3h) 

382. Religion and Culture in China. (3h) 

Europe 

ART 2029. Spanish Art & Architecture. (3h) 

2712. Studies in French Art (3h) 
ECN 2719. Economics of the European Community. (3h) 
ENG 362. Irish Literature in the Twentieth Century. (3h) 

368. Studies in Irish Literature. (3h) 
FRH 360. Cinema and Society. (3h) 

363. Trends in French and Francophone Poetry. (3h) 

364. French and Francophone Prose Fiction. (3h) 

365. French and Francophone Drama. (3h) 
GER 320. German Culture and Civilization I. (3h) 

321. German Culture and Civilization II. (3h) 
331. Weimar Germany. (3h) 
, 349. German Literature Before 1700. (3h) 

381. German Literature from the Enlightenment through Romanticism. (3h) 

383. German Literature from Poetic Realism through Naturalism. (3h) 
385. German Literature of the Modern Age. (3h) 

3507. Fin de Siecle Vienna. (3h) 
HST 218. France since 1815. (3h) 
224. Great Britain. (3h) 
2253. History of Venice. (3h) 

231. Russia and the Soviet Union: 1865 to tiie Present. (3h) 
314. European Economic and Social History, 1750-1990. (3h) 
318. Weimar Germany. (3h) 

328. History of the English Conunon Law. (3h) 
333. European Diplomacy, 1848-1914. (3h) 
HMN 2287. Viennese Culture from 1860 to 1914. (3h) 
230. Women Writers in Contemporary Italy. (3h) 
235. After Auschwitz: Holocaust Literature, Art & Theology. (3h) 

382. Italian Cinema and Society. (3h) 

383. Italian Fascism in Novels and Films. (3h) 
ITA 324. Italian Regional Cultures. (3h) 

325. Italian Neorealism in Film and Novels. (3h) 

326. Comedy in Italian Cinema. (3h) 

327. Modem Italian Cinema. (3h) 
POL 231. Western European Politics. (3h) 

232. Politics in Russia and Eastern Europe. (3h) 

233. The Politics of Modern Germany. (3h) 

234. Uiuted Kingdom Politics in a Global Age (3h) 

235. European Integration. (3h) 

2029. Political Structures of Present-Day Spain. (3h) 
RUS 210. The Russians and Their World. (3h) 

341. Russian Masterworks in Translation. (3h) 



169 



INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



SPN 334. Voices of Modem Spain. (3h) 

339. Introduction to Spanish Film Studies. (3h) 

Latin America 

ANT 313. Tradition, Continuity, and Struggle: Mexico and Central America. (3h) 

2029. Anthropology and Folklore. (3h) 
BUS 2229. Global Marketing Strategy (3h) 

2919. Global Business Studies: Spain and Latin America. (3h) 
EDU 3739. Comparative and International Education. (3h) 
HST 273. History of Mexico. (3h) 

275. Modern Latin America. (3h) 

284. Latin America's Colonial Past. (3h) 

374. Protest and Rebellion in Latin America. (3h) 

383. Revolution and Culture in Latin America. (3h) 
LAS 310. Special Topics in Latin-American Studies. (3h) 

398. Individual Study (3h) 
MUS 210. Survey of Latin-American Music. (3h) 
POL 236. Government and Politics in Latin America. (3h) 

257. Interamerican Relations. (3h) 
SPN 352. Contemporary Theatre in Spain and Spanish America. (3h) 

361. Cultural and Literary Identity in Latin America: 
From Colonial to Postcolonial Voices. (3h) 

362. Romantic Nationalism, Avant-garde Nihilism, and the 
Deconstruction of Utopia. (3h) 

363. Imagined "White" Nations: Race and Color in Latin America. (3h) 
366. Latin- American Cinema and Ideology. (3h) 

Middle East 

HST 243. The Middle East since 1500. (3h) 
POL 247. Islam and Politics. (3h) 

259. The Arab-Israeli Conflict. (3h) 
REL 210. Jerusalem in History and Tradition. (3h) 

313. Near Eastern Archaeology. (3h) 



Italian Studies 

(Foreign Area Study) 

Coordinator Professor of Romance Languages Antonio Vitti 

A semester in Venice or another approved course of study in Italy (or summer program at 
Middlebury, Vermont) is required. Students must take either ITA 212 or 213 plus three courses 
from the following groups, at least one each from Groups II and III. 

Additional elective courses may have been approved since publication of this bulletin. The 
program coordinator maintains a complete list of all approved elective courses. For course 
descriptions, see the relevant department's listings in this publication. 



ITALIAN STUDIES 



170 



I. Literature 

CLA 264. Greek and Roman Comedy. (3h) 

COM 370. Special Topics. (3h) (when topic is Three Italian Masters) 
HMN 213. Studies in European Literature. (3h) 
(appropriate topics and approval) 

214. Contemporary Fiction. (3h) ; 
(appropriate topics and approval) 

216. Romance Literature. (3h) 

217. European Drama. (3h) (appropriate topics and approval) 
230. Women Writers in Contemporary Italy. (3h) 

361, 362. Dante I and II. (1.5h,1.5h) 
ITA 212. Language and Cultures of Italy and Italian in the World. (3h) 

215. Introduction to Italian Literature II. (3h) 

(or any Italian course above 215) First Year Seminar 

325. Italian Neorealism in Films and Novels. (3h) 

326. Comedy in Italian Cinema. (3h) 
I 327. Modem Italian Cinema. (3h) 

330. Cinematic Adaptation and Literary Inspiration. (3h) 

II. Fine Arts 

ART 245. Roman Art. (3h) 

268. High Renaissance and Mannerist Art. (3h) 
2693. Venetian Renaissance Art. (3h) (offered in Venice) 
396K. Art History Seminar. (3h) (when topic is Three Italian Masters.) 
HMN 382. Italian Cinema and Society. (3h) 

383. Italian Fascism in Novels and Films. (3h) 
MUS 181. Music History I. (3h) 
182. Music History II. (3h) 
220. Seminar in Music History. (3h) 

III. History and the Social Sciences 

HST 222. The Renaissance and Reformation. (3h) 

2253. History of Venice. (3h) (offered in Venice) 

2263. Venetian Society and Cultiire. (3h) (offered in Venice) 

398. Individual Study. (l-3h) (if directed toward Italy) 

Students may also take appropriate courses in anthropology, economics, political science, psy- 
chology, religion, and sociology in the Venice program, and appropriate individual study topics 
in these departments. To graduate with a Certificate in Italian Studies, students must contact 
the registrar's office during the spring semester of the senior year to request that a transcript 
copy be sent to the Department of Romance Languages for approval. 



171 



ITALIAN STUDIES 



Journalism (JOU) 

(Minor) 

Coordinator Associate Professor of Journalism Wayne King 
Lecturers Justin Catanoso, Micliael Horn 
Visiting Instructor Mary Martin Niepold 

The minor in journalism consists of fifteen hours, including JOU 270, 276, and either 272 or 280. 
In addition to the required fifteen hours, minors in journalism are strongly advised to take 
ECN 150 and 221. The remaining courses must be selected from among the following. Addi- 
tional elective courses may have been approved since publication of this bulletin. The program 
coordinator maintains a complete list of all approved elective courses. For course descriptions, 
see the relevant department's listings in this publication. 

Journalism Courses 

270. Introduction to Journalism. (3h) Fundamentals of news writing, news judgment, and news 
gathering, Lncluding computer-assisted reporting and research. Intensive in-class writing. 

272. Editing. (3h) Laboratory course in copyediting, headline writing, typography, and make- 
up; practice on video display terminal. P — ^JOU 270. 

273. Writing for Radio-TV-Film. (3h) Introduction to writing for radio, television, and film. 
Emphasis is on informational and persuasive writing (news, features, public service announce- 
ments, commercials, political armouncements, news analyses, commentaries, and editorials). 

274. Media Production: Studio. (3h) Introduction to the production of audio and video media 
projects. Multiple camera studio production emphasized. Lecture /laboratory. 

275. Introduction to Mass Communication. (3h) Historical survey of mass media and an exami- 
nation of major contemporary media issues. Also listed as COM 245. 

276. Advanced Journalism. (3h) Intensive practice in writing various types of newspaper stories, 
including the feature article. Limited to students planning careers in journalism. P — ]OU 270 
or POI. 

277. Politics and the Mass Media. (3h) Exploration of the relationship between the political 
system and the mass media. Two broad concerns are the regulation of the mass media and the 
impact of media on political processes and events. Also listed as POL 217. 

278. History of Journalism. (3h) Study of the development of American journalism and its 
English origins, with attention to broad principles of mass communication from its beginnings 
through the Internet. 

280. Journalism, Ethics, and Law. (3h) Explores ethical problems confronting journalists, includ- 
ing such things as the public's right to know, invasion of privacy, censorship, coverage of 
politics and elections, objectivity, and race, gender, and bias in news reporting, against a back- 
ground of laws pertaining to areas such as libel and national security. 

282. Advanced Reporting. (3h) Explores and practices the methods and resources used by 
professional journalists to cover specialty beats and produce in-depth news and feature stories. 
Emphasis is placed on source development, story identification, public records research, and 
interviewing techniques. P — ]OU 270 or POI. 



JOURNALISM 172 



283. Introduction to Professional Writing. (3h) A hands-on course in writing across a number of 
disciplines — Web site copy, brochures, public relations, corporate statements, and marketing 
proposals. The course partners with a local nonprofit organization for the length of the semester 
and provides writing solutions, including Web site copy, for that organization. Local experts 
visit to address specific skills. Also listed as ESE 203. P — ^JOU 270. 

284. Advanced Expository Writing. (3h) Training and practice in writing expository prose at a 
level appropriate for publication in various print media, primarily magazines. Also listed as 
ENG 399. P— JOU 270 or POL 

286. Writing for Public Relations and Advertising. (L5h, 3h) Principles and techniques of public 
relations and applied advertising. Students use case studies to develop public relations and 
advertising strategies. Also listed as COM 117. P — POL 

298. Internship. (1.5h) Assists students in gaining practical experience in news-related enter- 
prises, under faculty supervision. 

299. Individual Study. (1.5h-3h) Independent study with faculty guidance. By prearrangement. 

Electives for Journalism 

ACC 111. Introductory Financial Accounting. (3h) 
COM 245. Introduction to Mass Communication. (3h) 
ECN 150. Introduction to Economics. (3h) 

221. Public Finance. (3h) 
JOU 272. or 280. Editing. (3h) or Journalism, Ethics, and Law. (3h) 
(whichever was not chosen as a required course) 

278. History of Journalism. (3h) 

282. Advanced Reporting. (3h) 

283. Introduction to Professional Writing. (3h) 

284. Writing for Publication. (3h) 

286. Writing for Public Relations and Advertising. (3h) 
POL 217. Politics and the Mass Media. (3h) 



Languages Across the Curriculum (LAC) 

Coordinator Charles E. Taylor Professor of Romance Languages Candelas Gala 

Languages Across the Curriculum (LAC) is a strategy to integrate foreign language use 
throughout the curriculum. It facilitates the collaboration of faculty by bridging disciplin- 
ary boundaries, and it promotes the internationalization of course offerings. LAC encourages 
multicultural understanding and an appreciation of the place of different disciplines in a global 
context. It recognizes the importance of multilingualism in today's society. Faculty and students 
learn how a discipline they have first studied in their native English is approached by different 
cultures and different linguistic codes. 

Faculty members determine the most appropriate LAC model and level for their courses. For 
more information about the various models for LAC implementation, visit www.wfu.edu/ 
academics / romancelanguages / related / lac.htm. 



173 



LANGUAGES ACROSS THE CURRICULUM 



Latin-American Studies (LAS) 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 

Director Reynolds Professor Luis Roniger 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages Mary Friedman 

Associate Professor of Political Science Peter Siavelis 

The minor in Latin- American studies provides an opportunity for students to undertake a 
multidisciplinary study of the history, geography, economics, politics, and culture of Latin 
America and the Caribbean. It consists of a total of fifteen hours; three of these (but no more) 
may also count toward the student's major. Candidates for the minor are required to take LAS 
210, Introduction to Latin-American Studies, and choose electives amounting to twelve hours 
of coursework on Latin America. No more than six of these twelve hours may be in a single 
discipline. 

Candidates should demonstrate proficiency in Spanish or Portuguese either by completing 
Spanish courses through the 213 level or by undergoing an oral proficiency interview with a 
member of the faculty of the Department of Romance Languages. 

Five-Year BA/MA Degree Program Option. Students who choose to minor in Latin-American 
studies have the opportimity to pursue a joint BA/MA program in conjunction with the Center 
for Latin- American Studies at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. This program allows 
outstanding students interested in Latin America to begin work toward an interdisciplinary 
master's degree in Latin- American studies while still undergraduates at Wake Forest, and to 
complete both degrees within a five-year period. The bachelor of arts degree is awarded by 
Wake Forest, while the master's degree is awarded by Georgetown. Interested students should 
contact the director of Latin- American studies or the five-year degree program coordinator. 

210. Introduction to Latin-American Studies. (3h) Introduction to the historical, economic, cul- 
tural, and social issues that shape Latin America. Also listed as ANT 210. (CD) 

220C. Afro-Cuban Cultural Expressions. (3h) Also Usted as SPN 371C. Offered in Havana. (CD) 

310. Special Topics in Latin-American Studies. (3h) Selected topics in Latin-American studies; 
topics vary from year to year. 

398. Individual Study. (3h) Reading, research, or internship course designed to meet the needs 
and interests of selected students, to be carried out under the supervision of a faculty member 
in the Latin-American studies minor. P — POL 

Students may choose from the following list of electives when designing their minor. See the 
relevant department listings for course descriptions. Additional elective courses may have been 
approved since publication of this bulletin. The program director maintains a complete list of 
all approved elective courses. Visit www.wfu.edu/las for current offerings. 

Electives for Latin-American Studies 

ANT 313. Tradition, Continuity and Struggle: Mexico and Central America. (3h) 
383, 384. Field Research in Cultural Anthropology. (3h, 3h) 
385, 386. Special Problems Seminar. (3h, 3h) if related to Latin America 
BIO 349S. Tropical Biodiversity. (4h) 



LATIN-AMERICAN STUDIES 



174 



ECN 251. International Trade. (3h) 

252. International Finance. (3h) (if related to Latin America) 

258. Economic Growth and Development. (3h) 
HST 273. History of Mexico. (3h) 

275. Modern Latin America. (3h) 

31L Special Topics in History. (3h) (if related to Latin America) 

374. Protest and Rebellion in Latin America. (3h) 
MUS 210. Survey of La tin- American Music. (3h) 
POL 236. Government and Politics in Latin America. (3h) 

240. Human Rights in Latin America. (3h) 

242. Topics in Comparative Politics. (3h) (if related to Latin America) 

257. Interamerican Relations. (3h) 

290. Senior Seminar in Political Science. (4h) (if related to Latin America.) 
Suggested to LAS minors who major in political science. 
PTG 113. Intensive Elementary Portuguese. (4h) 
SPN 318. Literary and Cultural Studies of Spanish America. (3h) 

319. Grammar and Composition. (4h) 

319L. Grammar and Composition for Heritage Speakers of Spanish. (4h) 

323. Advanced Grammar and Composition. (3h) 

351. Transatlantic Renaissance. (3h) 

360. Colonial Spanish America. (3h) 

361. Cultural and Literary Identity in Latin America: From Colonial 
to Postcolonial Voices. (3h) 

362. Romantic Nationalism, Avant-garde Nihilism, 
and the Deconstruction of Utopia. (3h) 

363. Imagined "White"Nations: Race and Color in Latin America. (3h) 

364. Transgressing Borders: Identity in Latin American 
and U.S. Latino Cultures. (3h) 

365. Twentieth-Century Spanish- American Theatre. (3h) 

366. Latin- American Cinema and Ideology. (3h) 

367. The Social Canvas of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Pablo Neruda. (3h) 

368. Spanish- American Short Story. (3h) 

369. Spanish- American Novel. (3h) 
370C. Cuban Literature. (3h) 

371C. Afro-Cuban Cultural Expressions. (3h) 

372. Spanish- American Theatre: From Page to Stage. (3h) 

379. Special Topics in Spanish American Literature and Culture. (3h). 

387. Introduction to Spanish for Business. (3h) 



175 



LATIN-AMERICAN STUDIES 



Linguistics (LIN) 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 

Coordinator Professor of Romance Languages (Spanish) iVl. Stanley Whitley 

The interdisciplinary minor in linguistics requires LIN 150, Introduction to Linguistics, and 
twelve additional hours. Students minoring in linguistics are strongly encouraged to study 
foreign languages, achieving proficiency in at least one, and social and behavioral sciences. The 
minor may be usefully combined with a major in a foreign language, English, anthropology (or 
other social science), philosophy, or communication. 

The twelve hours in addition to LIN 150 may be chosen from the following three groups: 
linguistics courses, historical linguistics, and related topics. It is strongly recommended that at 
least one course be from historical linguistics. 

Students intending to minor in linguistics should consult the coordinator of linguistics in 
the Department of Romance Languages, preferably during their sophomore year. Students may 
choose from the approved list of electives when designing their minor. For course descriptions, 
see the relevant department's listings in this publication. Additional elective courses may have 
been approved since publication of this bulletin. The program coordinator maintains a com- 
plete list of all elective courses that fulfill the minor. 

Linguistics Courses 

1 50. Introduction to Linguistics. (3h) The social phenomenon of language: how it originated and 
developed, how it is learned and used, its relationship to other kinds of behavior; types of lan- 
guage (oral, written, signed) and language families; analysis of linguistic data; and social issues 
of language use. Also listed as ANT 150. (CD) 

301. Semantics and Language in Communication. (3h) Study of how meaning is created by sign 
processes. Topics studied include language theory, semiotics, speech act theory, and pragmatics. 
Also listed as COM 301. 

310. Sociolinguistics and Dialectology. (3h) Study of variation in language: effects of regional 
background, social class, ethnic group, gender, and setting; social attitudes toward language; 
outcomes of linguistic conflicts in the community; evolution of research methods for investigat- 
ing language differences and the diffusion of change. P — LIN 150 or POL 

330. Introduction to Psycholinguistics and Language Acquisition. (3h) Psychological and linguis- 
tic study of the mental processes underlying the acquisition and use of language; how children 
acquire the structure of language and how adults make use of linguistic systems. 

333. Language and Gender. (3h) Uses an anthropological perspective to examine relationships 
between language structure, language use, persons, and social categories. Also listed as ANT 333. 

337.TESOL Linguistics. (3h) An introduction to the theoretical and practical linguistics resources 
and skills for teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) within the United States 
or abroad. Also listed as EDU 337. P — LIN 150 or ENG 304; knowledge of a second language is 
recommended. 



LINGUISTICS 



176 



340. Topics in Linguistics. (3h) Interdisciplinary study of selected topics, such as morphology, 
phonology /phonetics, syntax, historical linguistics, history of linguistic theory, semiotics, and 
ethnolinguistics, issues in Asian linguistics, language and gender. May be repeated for credit if 
topic varies. P— LIN 150 or POI. 

351. Comparative Communication. (1.5h, 3h) Comparison of communicative and linguistic pro- 
cesses in one or more national cultures with those of the United States. Also listed as COM 351. 
(CD) 

351 A Japan (CD) 351D Multiple Countries (CD) 

351B Russia (CD) 351E China (CD) 

351C Great Britain (CD) 

375. Philosophy of Language. (3h) Study of such philosophical issues about language as truth 
and meaning, reference and description, proper names, indexicals, modality, tense, the semantic 
paradoxes, and the differences between languages and other sorts of sign systems. Also listed 
as PHI 375. P— POI. 

383. Language Engineering: Localization & Terminology. (3h) Introduction to the process of 
making a product linguistically and culturally appropriate to the target locale, and to computer- 
assisted terminology management. Surveys applications in translation technology. Taught in 
English. P— POI. 

398, 399. Individual Study. (l-3h, l-3h) Designed to meet the needs of selected students, to 
be carried out under the supervision of a faculty member in the linguistics minor program. 
P— LIN 150 and POI. 

SIL 101, 102. Self Instructional Language. (3h, 3h) Students wishing to learn a language not of- 
fered at Wake Forest may arrange to study the language in consultation with a native speaker. 
Does not count toward the linguistics minor without approval from the coordinator. P — POI. 

Electlves for Linguistics 

Historical Linguistics 

ENG 304. History of the English Language. (3h) 
RUS 332. The History of the Russian Language. (3h) 
SPN 321. The Rise of Spanish. (3h) 

Related Topics 

ANT 355. Language and Culture. (3h) 

ENG 390. The Structure of English. (3h) - . 

FRH 322. French Phonetics. (3h) 

RUS 330. The Structure of Russian. (3h) 

SPN 322. Spanish Pronunciation and Dialect Variation. (3h) 

324. Contrastive Spanish /English Grammar and Stylistics. (3h) 



177 



LINGUISTICS 



Mathematics (MTH) 

Chair Stephen B. Robinson 

Reynolds Professor Robert J. Plemmons 

Professors Edward E. Allen, Richard D. Carmichael, FredricT. Howard, Ellen E. Kirkman, 

James Kuzmanovich, J. Gaylord May, James L Norris III, Stephen B. Robinson 

Sterge Faculty Fellow and Associate Professor Miaohua Jiang 

Associate Professors Kenneth S. Berenhaut, Hugh N. Howards 

Sterge Faculty Fellows and Assistant Professors Sarah Raynor, Gregory Warrington 

Assistant Professor R. Jason Parsley 

Visiting Assistant Professors Caria D. Cotwright, Christopher Dometrius 

Instructors Janice Blackburn, Jule M. Connolly, David C. Wilson 

Adjunct Instructor Cynthia K. Suerken . 

A major in mathematics can be achieved by satisfying the requirements listed for either the 
bachelor of arts or bachelor of science. Lower division students are urged to consult a member 
of the departmental faculty before enrolling in courses other than those satisfying Division V 
requirements. 

The bachelor of arts in mathematics requires MTH 112, 113, 121, 211 or 311, and 321 with at least 
five additional three-hour courses numbered higher than 109 (excluding 381), at least two of 
which must be numbered above 300. 

The bachelor of arts in mathematics with a concentration in statistics requires MTH 112, 113, 121, 
211 or 311, 321, 357, 358, 359, and either 256 or both 109 and another three-hour course num- 
bered 200 or above (excluding 381). 

The bachelor of science in mathematics requires MTH 112, 113, 121, 311, 321, 391, and 392 with at 
least six additional three-hour courses numbered higher than 109 (excluding 381), at least three 
of which must be numbered above 300. 

The bachelor of science in mathematics with a concentration in statistics requires MTH 112, 113, 
121, 311, 321, 357, 358, 359, 391, 392; one additional three-hour course numbered 300 or above 
(excluding 381); and 256 or both 109 and another three-hour course numbered 200 or above 
(excluding 381). Additionally, the research and paper prepared for 391 and 392 must be on a 
topic related to statistics. 

A minor in mathematics requires MTH 112, either 113 or 121, and four other courses of at least 
three hours each numbered higher than MTH 105, two of which must be numbered above 200. 
Credit is allowed for either MTH 107 or 109, but not both. Neither MTH 301, 302, 303, or 304 
can count as a course for this minor, but any pair may be so counted. Credit is not allowed for 
both MTH 113 and 301; for both MTH 121 and 302; or for both MTH 303 and 317. 

A minor in statistics requires five courses chosen from MTH 109, 117, 121, 211, 311, 256, 357, 358, 
or 359; ANT 380; BIO 380; BUS 201, 202; ECN 215; HES 262, 360; PSY 311, 312; SOC 371, 372; 
at least two of which must be chosen from MTH 357, 358, 359. Additionally, no more than one 
course can be chosen from ANT 380; BIO 380; BUS 201; HES 262; MTH 109; PSY 311; or SOC 371 
to satisfy this minor. 



MATHEMATICS 



178 



A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in courses which comprise a major or minor in the 
department is required for graduation with any major or minor which the department offers. 
Students may not earn both a major and a minor in the department. 

The department regularly schedules activities in mathematics for students that enhance the 
course offerings. Examples are participation in the annual Putnam examination and the COMAP 
contest in mathematical modeling; meetings of the mathematics club; seminars and courses 
which build upon the regularly scheduled course offerings; and student research with faculty. 

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematical Economics. The Department of Mathematics 
and the Department of Economics offer a joint major leading to a bachelor of science degree in 
mathematical economics. This interdisciplinary program offers the student an opportunity to 
apply mathematical methods to the development of economic theory, models, and quantitative 
analysis. The major has the following course requirements: MTH 112, 113, 121, 254, 255; ECN 
150, 205, 207, 210, 211, 215, 218; and three additional (3h) courses chosen with the approval of 
the program advisers. Students selecting the joint major must receive permission from both the 
Department of Mathematics and the Department of Economics. 

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematical Business. The Department of Mathematics 
and the Wayne Calloway School of Business and Accountancy offer a joint major leading to a 
bachelor of science degree in mathematical business. This interdisciplinary program, consisting 
of no more than forty-eight hours, prepares students for careers in business with a strong back- 
ground in mathematics. The major has the following course requirements: MTH 253, 256, 301 
(or 113), 302 (or 121), 353; ACC 221; BUS 211, 221, 231, 241, 251, 261, 292; and a minimum of two 
additional (3h) courses chosen from among mathematics and business, not both courses chosen 
from business, with the mathematics courses being chosen from three-hour courses at the 300 
level or higher, excluding 381. The following courses are prerequisites for admission into this 
major: MTH 112, ACC 111, BUS 100, and ECN 150. CSC 111, 112, and MTH 251 are sta-ongly rec- 
ommended electives. Students electing this joint major must receive permission from both the 
Department of Mathematics and the Wayne Calloway School of Business and Accountancy. To 
graduate from Wake Forest University with a major in mathematical business, the student must 
satisfy the requirements for graduation of both the Department of Mathematics and the Wajme 
Calloway School of Business and Accountancy. Refer to the description in this bulletin for the 
admission, continuation, and graduation requirements of the Calloway School. 

Honors. Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in mathematics or the joint majors. To be graduated with the designation 
"Honors in Mathematics," "Honors in Mathematical Business," or "Honors in Mathematical 
Economics," students must satisfactorily complete a senior research paper. To graduate with 
"Honors in Mathematics" or "Honors in Mathematical Business," majors must have a mini- 
mum grade point average of 3.5 in the major and 3.0 in all college coursework. For additional 
information, members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

Students who are enrolled at Wake Forest may not take courses in mathematics at other institu- 
tions to satisfy divisional requirements. 

105. Fundamentals of Algebra and Trigonometry. (1.5h, 2.5h, or 3h) Review of the essentials 
of algebra and trigonometry. Admission by permission only (generally, a student must have 
taken fewer than three years of high school mathematics to be eligible for admission). Not to be 
counted toward the major or minor in mathematics. 



179 



MATHEMATICS 



107. Explorations in Mathematics. (4h) Introduction to mathematical reasoning and problem 
solving. Topics vary by instructor and may include one or more of the following: knot theory, 
Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, set theory, cryptography, discrete models, number 
theory, discrete mathematics, chaos theory, probability, and MAPLE prograrmning. (D, QR) 

109. Elementary Probability and Statistics. (4h) Probability and distribution functions, means and 
variances, and sampling distributions. (D, QR) 

1 1 1. Calculus with Analytic Geometry I. (4h) Functions, trigonometric fimctions, limits, continu- 
ity, differentiation, applications of derivatives, introduction to integration, the fundamental 
theorem of calculus. (D, QR) 

112. Calculus with Analytic Geometry II. (4h) Techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, 
improper integrals, transcendental functions, sequences, Taylor 's formula, and infinite series, 
including power series. (D, QR) 

113. Multivariable Calculus. (4h) The calculus of vector functions, including geometry of Euclid- 
ean space, differentiation, extrema, line integrals, multiple integrals, and Green's, Stokes', and 
divergence theorems. Credit not allowed for both 113 and 301. (D, QR) 

117. Discrete Mathematics. (4h) Introduction to various topics in discrete mathematics applica- 
ble to computer science including sets, relations. Boolean algebra, propositional logic, functions, 
computability, proof techniques, graph theory, and elementary combinatorics. (D, QR) 

121. Linear Algebra I. (3h) Vectors and vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices, deter- 
minants, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Credit not allowed for both 121 and 302. (D, QR) 

165. Problem-Solving Seminar. (Ih) Weekly seminar designed for students who wish to partici- 
pate in mathematical competition such as the annual Putnam examination. Not to be counted 
toward any major or minor offered by the department. May be repeated for credit. Pass/Fail 
only. 

21 1 . Advanced Calculus. (3h) Rigorous proof-oriented development of important ideas in calcu- 
lus. Limits and continuity, sequences and series, pointwise and uniform convergence, deriva- 
tives and integrals. Credit not allowed for both 211 and 311. (D) 

243. Codes and Cryptography. (3h) Essential concepts in coding theory and cryptography. 
Congruences, cryptosystems, public key, Huffman codes, information theory, and other coding 
methods. (D) 

251. Ordinary Differential Equations. (3h) Linear equations with constant coefficients, linear 
equations with variable coefficients, and existence and uniqueness theorems for first order 
equations. P— MTH 112. (D, QR) 

253. Operations Research. (3h) Mathematical models and optimization techniques. Studies in 
allocation, simulation, queuing, scheduling, and network analysis. P — MTH 111. (D, QR) 

254. Optimization Theory. (1.5h) Unconstrained and constrained optimization problems; La- 
grange multiplier methods; sufficient conditions involving bordered Hessians; inequality con- 
straints; Kuhn-Tucker conditions; applications primarily to problems in economics. P — MTH 
113 and 121. 

255. Dynamical Systems. (1.5h) Introduction to optimal control, including the Pontryagin 
maximum principle, and systems of nonlinear differential equations, particularly phase space 



MATHEMATICS 



180 



methods. Applications to problems in economics, including optimal management of renewable 
resources. P— MTH 113 and 121. 

256. Statistical Methods. (3h) Study of statistical methods that have proved useful in many dif- 
ferent disciplines. These methods include tests of model assumptions, regression, general linear 
models, nonparametric alternatives, and analysis of data collected over time. Knowledge of 
matrix algebra is desirable but not necessary. (D, QR) 

301. Vector Analysis. (1.5h) Vector functions, partial derivatives, line and multiple integrals. 
Green's theorem, Stokes' theorem, divergence theorem. Not to be counted toward any major 
offered by the department except for the major in mathematical business. Credit not allowed for 
both 113 and 301. P— MTH 112. 

302. Matrix Algebra. (1.5h) Matrices, determinants, solutions of linear equations, special matri- 
ces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices. Not to be counted toward any major offered by 
the department except for the major in mathematical business. Credit not allowed for both 121 
and 302. 

303. Complex Variables. (1.5h) Topics in analytic function theory, Cauchy's theorem, Taylor and 
Laurent series, residues. Not to be counted toward any major offered by the department. Credit 
not allowed for both 303 and 317. P— MTH 112. 

304. Applied Partial Differential Equations. (1.5h) The separation of variables technique for the 
solution of the wave, heat, Laplace, and other partial differential equations with the related 
study of special functions and Fourier series. Not to be counted toward any major offered by 
the department. P— MTH 251. 

31 1, 312. Introductory Real Analysis I, II. (3h, 3h) Limits and continuity in metric spaces, sequenc- 
es and series, differentiation and Riemann-Stieltjes integration, uniform convergence, power 
series and Fourier series, differentiation of vector functions, implicit and inverse function theo- 
rems. Credit not allowed for both 211 and 311. (D) 

317. Complex Analysis I. (3h) Analytic fvmctions, Cauchy's theorem and its consequences, power 
series, and residue calculus. Credit not allowed for both 303 and 317. P — MTH 113. (D) 

321 . Modern Algebra I. (3h) Introduction to modern abstract algebra through the study of groups, 
rings, integral domains, and fields. P — MTH 121. (D) 

322. Modern Algebra II. (3h) Continuation of modern abstract algebra through the study of ad- 
ditional properties of groups, rings, and fields. P — MTH 321. (D) 

324. Linear Algebra II. (3h) Thorough treatment of vector spaces and linear transformations over 
an arbitrary field, canonical forms, inner product spaces, and linear groups. P — MTH 121 and 
321. (D) • 

326. Numerical Linear Algebra. (3h) Numerical methods for solving matrix and related problems 
in science and engineering. Topics include systems of linear equations, least squares methods, 
and eigenvalue computations. Emphasis given to parallel matrix computations. Begirming 
knowledge of a programming language, such as Pascal, FORTRAN, or C, is required. Credit not 
allowed for both 326 and CSC 352. P— MTH 112 and MTH 121 or 302. (D) 

331. Geometry. (3h) Introduction to axiomatic geometry including a comparison of Euclidean 
and non-Euclidean geometries. (D) 



181 



MATHEMATICS 



334. Differential Geometry. (3h) Introduction to the theory of curves and surfaces in two and 
three dimensional space, including such topics as curvature, geodesies, and minimal surfaces. 
P— MTH 113. (D) 

345, 346. Elementary Theory of Numbers I, II. (3h, 3h) Properties of integers, including congru- 
ences, primitive roots, quadratic residues, perfect numbers, Pythagorean triples, sums of 
squares, continued fractions, Fermat's Last Theorem, and the Prime Number Theorem. (D) 

347. Graph Theory. (3h) Paths, circuits, trees, planar graphs, spanning trees, graph coloring, 
perfect graphs, Ramsey theory, directed graphs, enumeration of graphs, and graph theoretic 
algorithms. (D) 

348, 349. Combinatorial Analysis I, II. (3h, 3h) Enumeration techniques, generating functions, 
recurrence formulas, the principle of inclusion and exclusion, Polya theory, graph theory, com- 
binatorial algorithms, partially ordered sets, designs, Ramsey theory, symmetric fimctions, and 
Schur functions. (D) 

352. Partial Differential Equations. (3h) Detailed study of partial differential equations, including 
the heat, wave, and Laplace equations, using methods such as separation of variables, charac- 
teristics. Green's fimctions, and the maximum principle. P — MTH 113 and 251. (D) 

353. Mathematical Models. (3h) Development and application of probabilistic and deterministic 
models. Emphasis given to constructing models which represent systems in the social, behav- 
ioral, and management sciences. (D) 

355. Introduction to Numerical Methods. (3h) Numerical computations on modem computer 
architectures; floating point arithmetic and round-off error. Programming in a scientific /engi- 
neering language such as MATLAB, C, or FORTRAN. Algorithms and computer techniques 
for the solution of problems such as roots of functions, approximation, integration, systems of 
linear equations and least squares methods. Credit not allowed for both MTH 355 and CSC 355. 
P— MTH 112, MTH 121 or 302, and CSC 111. (D) 

357, 358. Mathematical Statistics I, II. (3h, 3h) Probability distributions, mathematical expecta- 
tion, sampling distributions, estimation and testing of hypotheses, regression, correlation, 
and analysis of variance. MTH 357 prepares students for Actuarial Exam #1. C — MTH 112 or 
P— POL (D) 

359. Multivariate Statistics. (3h) Multivariate and generalized linear methods for classification, 
modeling, discrimination, and analysis. P — MTH 112, MTH 121 or 302, and MTH 256. (D) 

361 . Selected Topics. (1.5h, 2.5h, or 3h) Topics in mathematics not considered in regular courses 
or which continue study begim in regular courses. Content varies. 

381. Individual Study. (1.5h, 2.5h, or 3h) Independent study directed by a faculty adviser. By 
prearrangement. 

391 . Senior Seminar Preparation. (Ih) Independent study or research directed by a faculty ad- 
viser by prearrangement with the adviser. 

392. Senior Seminar Presentation. (Ih) Preparation of a paper, followed by a one-hour oral pre- 
sentation based upon work in MTH 391. 



MATHEMATICS 



182 



Medieval Studies 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 
Coordinators Professors of English Gillian Overing and Gale Sigal 

The interdisciplinary minor in medieval studies requires eighteen hours, chosen from at least 
three different departments. Courses from the student's major may count in the minor. Students 
are encouraged, but not required, to attend the six-week Summer Medieval Program at Oxford 
University in England, for which they receive 4.5 hours (two courses) which count toward the 
minor. (For details about application to the Oxford program, and possible financial aid, consult 
Gale Sigal in the English department.) 

Courses may be chosen from the following list. Additional elective courses may have been 
approved since publication of this bulletin. The program coordinators maintain a complete list 
of all approved elective courses. For course descriptions, see the relevant department's listings 
in this publication. 

Electives for Medieval Studies 

ART 252. Romanesque Art. (3h) 

253. The Gothic Cathedral. (3h) 

254. Luxury Arts in the Middle Ages. (3h) 
267. Early Italian Renaissance Art. (3h) 

396. Art History Seminar: b. Medieval Art. (1.5h, 3h) 
ENG 305. Old English Language and Literature. (3h) 

310. The Medieval World. (3h) 

311. The Legend of Arthur. (3h) 

312. Medieval Poetry. (3h) 
315. Chaucer. (3h) 

320. British Drama to 1642. (3h) 
FRH 370. Seminar in French and Francophone Studies. (3h) 

(Periodically offered in medieval studies) 
GER 349. German Literature before 1700. (3h) 
HST 206. The Early Middle Ages. (3h) 

207. The High Middle Ages Through the Renaissance. (3h) 
242. The Middle East before 1500. (3h) 
311. Special Topics in History, (when topic is Jerusalem) (3h) 
HMN 320. Perspectives on the Middle Ages. (3h) 

361. Dante L(1.5h) 

362. Dante II. (1.5h) 

PHI 237. Medieval Philosophy. (3h) 

POL 274. Religion and Politics in Medieval Thought. (3h) 

REL 367. The Mystics of the Church. (3h) 

372. History of Christian Thought (3h) 
SPN 331. Medieval Spain: A Cultural and Literary Perspective. (3h) 
THE 260. History of Western Theatre I (Begiimings to 1642). (3h) 

Students intending to minor in medieval studies should consult one of the coordinators, prefer- 
ably during the sophomore year. 



183 



MEDIEVAL STUDIES 



Middle East and South Asia Studies 

(Minor) 

Coordinator Professor of Political Science Charles H. Kennedy 

The Middle East and South Asia studies minor provides students with an opportunity to en- 
gage in a multidisciplinary study of the history, politics, literature, peoples, and cultures of the 
Middle East and South Asia. To fulfill the minor, students must complete eighteen hours from 
an approved list of courses. The most recent courses approved are listed below. 

Additional elective courses may have been approved since publication of this bulletin. The 
program coordinator maintains a complete list of all approved elective courses. For course 
descriptions, see the relevant department's listings in this publication. Some courses relevant to 
the minor are not taught on a regular basis; others are offered by visiting or temporary faculty. 

Electives for Middle East and South Asia Studies 

ANT 334. Peoples and Cultures of South Asia. (3h) 

383., 384. Field Research in Cultural Anthropology, 
(when topic is appropriate) (3h, 3h) 
Arabic 111, 112. Elementary Arabic. (3h) 
153. Intermediate Arabic. (4h) 
ART 104. Topics in World Art. (when topic is appropriate) (3h) 
ENG 358. Postcolonial Literature. (3h) 

359. Studies in Postcolonial Literature. (3h) 
HST 210. Colloquium in Historical Diversity, (when topic is appropriate) (3h) 

242. The Middle East before 1500. (3h) 

243. The Middle East since 1500. (3h) 

311. Special Topics in History, (when topic is appropriate) (3h) 
HMN 2248. Cross-cultural Encounters in Morocco. (3h) 
POL 242. Topics in Comparative Politics, (when topic is appropriate) (3h) 

246. Politics and Policies in South Asia. (3h) 

247. Islam and Politics. (3h) 

252. Topics in International Politics (when topic is appropriate) (3h) 
259. The Arab-Israeli Conflict. (3h) 
263. U.S. Foreign Policy in the Middle East. (3h) 
274. Religion and Politics in Medieval Thought. (3h) 
290. Senior Seminar in Political Science, (when topic is appropriate) (4h) 
REL 362. Islam. (3h) 



MIDDLE EAST AND SOUTH ASIA STUDIES ^34 



Military Science (MIL) 

Professor Lieutenant Colonel M. Keith Callahan 

Assistant Professor John H. Stoneburg IV 

Executive Officer Darrell L. Sydnor 

Adjunct Instructor Donald J. Moser 

Completion of Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps (AROTC) requirements and recommen- 
dation for appointment by the professor of military science may result in commissioning as a 
second lieutenant in the active or reserve force components of the Army of the United States, as 
determined by the Secretary of the Army. 

The AROTC program is composed of the basic course and the advanced course. The basic 
course consists of four courses (121, 122, 123, and 124), sometimes with either 117 or 118 taken 
each semester as a corequisite. No military obligation is incurred by enrollment in the basic 
course, except by Army ROTC Scholarship cadets. The basic course may be completed, partially 
or fully, by various alternative methods (i.e., through credit for specific types of Junior ROTC or 
other military training, as determined by the professor of military science, or through comple- 
tion of a six-week summer Leader's Training Course). 

The advanced course consists of four courses (225, 226, 227, and 228), with either 117 or 118 
taken each semester as a corequisite, and a five-week Leader Development and Assessment 
Course, usually attended during the summer between the junior and senior years. Army ROTC 
scholarships are available to qualified applicants (both those already enrolled in the AROTC 
program and those not yet enrolled) through annual competition. 

114. Leadership. (1.5h) Examination of the fundamentals contributing to the development of a 
personal style of leadership with emphasis on the dimensions of junior executive management; 
specifically in the areas of business, politics, sports, and the military. 

1 17, 1 18. Leadership Laboratory. (O.Oh) Basic military skills instruction designed to technically 
and tactically qualify the student for assumption of an officer leadership position at the small- 
unit level. Either MIL 117 (fall) or 118 (spring) is required each semester for contracted AROTC 
cadets (including those conditionally contracted), advance designee scholarship winners, and 
non-contracted AROTC cadets taking their third and fourth military science courses. Pass/ 
Fail only. C — Any other military science core course. P — POI of military science, except when 
required as explained above. 

121. Introduction to Army ROTC and the U.S. Army. (1.5h) Introduction to the Army Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps and to the U.S. Army, exploring roles, organization, customs and 
h-aditions. C— MIL 117. 

122. Introduction to Problem Solving, Decision Making, and Leadership. (3h) Introduction to the 
"life skills" of problem solving, decision making, and leadership. Designed to help students be 
more effective leaders and managers, whether they serve in the military or lead in civilian life. 
Topics addressed include problem solving, critical thinking, problem solving methods, leader- 
ship theory, foUowership, group cohesion, goal setting, and feedback mechanisms. Seminar 
format emphasizes student discussions and practical exercises. P — MIL 121 or POI. C — MIL 118. 

123. Introduction to U.S. Army Leadership Skill. (3h) Introduction to the Army tactical concepts 
such as map reading, land navigation and general operations with a focus on the Army leader- 
ship model exploring the sixteen leadership dimensions. C — MIL 117. 



185 



MILITARY SCIENCE 



124. Leadership in the U.S. Army. (3h) Theoretical and practical leadership instruction. Examines 
communication and leadership concepts such as written and oral communication, effective 
listening, assertiveness, personality, adult development, motivation, and organizational culture 
and change. Lessons maximize student participation, inspire intellectual curiosity, and clarify 
practical application. Concludes with a major leadership and problem-solving case study. After 
completion, students are well-grounded in fundamental leadership principles and are better 
prepared to apply such principles to a wide variety of life experiences. P — MIL 121, 122 and 
123, or POL C— MIL 118. 

225. Military Operations. (3h) Instruction and case studies that build leadership competencies 
and military skills in preparation for future responsibilities as Army officers. Specific instruc- 
tion in the principles of war, decision-making processes, planning models, and risk assessment. 
Advanced leadership instruction focuses on motivational theory, the role and actions of leaders, 
and organizational communications. P — MIL 121 through 124 (or equivalent credit as deter- 
mined by the professor of military science). C — MIL 117. 

226. Advanced Military Operations. (3h) Instruction and case studies that build upon the leader- 
ship competencies and military skills attained in MIL 225 in preparation for future responsibili- 
ties as Army officers. Specific instruction is given in individual leader development, planning 
and execution of small unit operations, individual and team development, and the Army as a 
career choice. P — MIL 121 through 124 (or equivalent credit as determined by the professor of 
military science) and MIL 225. C— MIL 118. 

227. Leadership and Management in the U.S. Army I. (3h) Theory and practice of military leader- 
ship. Emphasis on the Uniform Code of Military Justice, the Manual for Courts-Martial, the 
Law of Land Warfare and the Army's personnel, training, and logistical management systems. 
P — MIL 121 through 124 (or equivalent credit as determined by the professor of military 
science) and MIL 225 and 226. C— MIL 117. 

228. Leadership and Management in the U.S. Army II. (3h) Continuation of MIL 227 with em- 
phasis on the transition from cadet to officer. P — MIL 121 through 124 (or equivalent credit as 
determined by the professor of military science) and MIL 225 through 227. C — MIL 118. 

229. American Military History. (3h) The American military experience with emphasis on the 
ideas and activities contributing to the development of the United States' unique military 
establishment. Particular emphasis on civilian control of the military. Credit not allowed for 
both MIL 229 and HST 369. P— POL 



MILITARY SCIENCE j^gg 



Music (MUS) 

Chair Stewart Carter 

Composer-in-Residence and Professor Dan Locklair 

Professors Susan Harden Berwick, Stewart Carter, Louis Goldstein, Peter Kairoff, 

David B. Levy, Teresa Radomski 

Director of Choral Ensembles and Associate Professor Brian Gorelick 

Associate Professors Jacqui Carrasco, Richard E. Heard 

Director of Bands C. Kevin Bowen 

Director of Orchestra David Hagy 

Senior Lecturers Patricia Dixon, Kathryn Levy 

Lecturer Joanne Inkman 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Lawrence Dillon 

Adjunct Instructors John Paul Antonelli, Banna Deal 

Lecturer Morten Solvik (Vienna) 

The Department of Music offers two majors, one in music performance, requiring thirty-eight 
hoiirs, and a second in music in hberal arts, requiring forty hours. Students who choose one of 
these majors may not choose the other as a second major. Both majors include a basic curricu- 
lum of music theory (MUS 171, 172, 173, 174, sixteen hours) and music history (MUS 181, 182, 
183, nine hours), and four semesters of MUS 100. 

Major in Music in Liberal Arts. In addition to the basic curriculum, the major in music in liberal 
arts requires three hours of individual instruction (MUS 161 or 162), three hours of ensembles 
(excluding MUS 128 and 129), taken in three semesters; seven hours of elective courses in 
music— excluding ensembles and MUS 101, 104, 109, 131, 161-162, 165-168, 175, 177, 262— and a 
performance proficiency examination. The major in music in liberal arts must complete a senior 
project (MUS 397 or 398). To undertake the senior project, a student must have a grade point 
average of 2.0 in courses in the major. 

Major in Music Performance. To be admitted to the major in music performance, a student must 
first successfully complete MUS 171 and then pass an audition before the entire music faculty. 
The audition should be performed during the sophomore year. Students who audition are 
required to (1) demonstrate technical skill (scales, arpeggios, etudes), (2) perform standard rep- 
ertoire, and (3) sight-read. All three of these areas must be deemed strong enough by a major- 
ity vote of the faculty to be accepted as a major in music performance. In addition to the basic 
curriculum, the major in music performance requires six hours of individual instruction above 
the 100 level (MUS 262 and either 362 or 363), which requires as a prerequisite the successful 
completion of an audition; four hours of ensembles (excluding MUS 119, 128, and 129), taken 
in four semesters; and three hours of elective courses in music, excluding ensembles and MUS 
101, 104, 109, 131, 161-162, 165-168, 175, 177, 262. The major in music performance must present 
a senior recital. To tmdertake the senior recital, a student must have a grade point average of 2.0 
in courses in the major. 

Students considering a major in music performance or music in liberal arts are urged to begin 
their musical studies during the first year and should consult the chair of the department as 
soon as possible after entering the University. 



187 



Honors. Highly qualified majors in music performance or music in liberal arts may be invited 
by the music faculty to apply for admission to honors in music. To be graduated with the desig- 
nation "Honors in Music," a candidate must have an overall grade point average of at least 3.0, 
and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in courses in the major, be selected for this honor by the 
music faculty, and successfully complete either MUS 363 or 398. More information is available 
from the music department. 

A minor in music requires nineteen hours: MUS 171, 172; one course from MUS 181, 182, 183; 
two hours of ensemble (excluding MUS 128, 129), taken in two semesters; two hours of individ- 
ual instruction; three semesters of MUS 100; and four hours of elective courses in music, three 
of which must be in music in liberal arts, excluding MUS 100, 101, 104, and 109. Each minor is 
assigned an adviser in the music department and is encouraged to begin individual lessons, 
MUS 171, and MUS 100 as early as possible. 

Regarding ensemble requirements for the majors and minor in music, students who are singers 
must fulfill the ensemble requirement by enrolling in MUS 114, 115 and/or 116. Students who 
play a band or orchestral instrument must fulfill the ensemble requirement by performing on 
their primary instrument in MUS 112, 113, 118, and/or 121. Performers on keyboard instru- 
ments are strongly encouraged to enroll in one of the above ensembles, but may also fulfill the 
ensemble requirement through participation in chamber music (MUS 120). 

Music in Liberal Arts 

100. Recitals. (Oh) Recitals, concerts, and guest lectures sponsored by the Department of Music 
and the Secrest Artists Series. (Specific attendance requirements are established at the beginning 
of each semester.) Four semesters are required of music majors; three semesters are required of 
music minors. Pass /Fail only. 

101. Introduction to Western Music. (3h) Basic theoretical concepts and musical terminology. Sur- 
vey of musical styles, composers, and selected works from the Middle Ages through the present 
day. May not count toward the majors or minor in music. (D) 

104. Basic Music Reading and Skills. (1.5h) Study of the fundamentals of music theory including 
key signatures, scales, intervals, chords, and basic sight-singing and ear-training skills. De- 
signed for shadents wishing to participate in University ensembles and those wishing to pursue 
vocal, instrumental, and compositional instruction. May not count toward the majors or minor 
in music. 

106. Electronic Music Lab. (1.5h) Foundations of MIDI protocol, with particular attention to the 
study and application of sequencers, notational programs, and synthesizers. Development of 
skills in written notation through use of computerized programs. Taught in the Music Com- 
puter Lab. P— MUS 101, 104, or POI. 

109. Introduction to the Music of World Cultures. (3h) Survey of music in selected societies 
around the world. Topics selected from the following areas of concentration: India, East Asia, 
sub-Saharan Africa, western Europe, Latin America, and vernacular music of the Urvited States 
(including jazz). May not count toward the majors or minor in music. Credit cannot be received 
for both MUS 109 and 209. (CD, D) 

130. African-American Art Song. (3h) Survey of the art songs of African- American composers of 
the nineteenth and twentieth century. Emphasis on song for solo voice and piano, with some 
discussion of works for voice and orchestra or chamber ensemble. P — POI. (CD) 



188 



MUSIC 



131. The World of Musical Instruments. (3h) Historical survey of musical instruments by families. 
Instruments of Western art music, selected world cultures, and vernacular music of the U.S., as 
well as electronic instruments. Emphasis on the cultural, sociological, and technological as well 
as the musical aspects of instruments. Credit cannot be received for both MUS 131 and 231. (D) 

171. Music Theory I. (4h) Music fundamentals (key signatures, scales, modes, intervals, chords), 
simple part-writing, sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard harmony. Prerequisite for the audi- 
tion in music performance. Designed for music majors and minors. Offered in fall. 

172. Music Theory II. (4h) Seventh chords, secondary chords, altered chords, part-writing, basic 
counterpoint, basic musical forms, sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard harmony. Offered in 
spring.?— MUS 171. 

173. Music Theory III. (4h) Altered chords, continuation of part-writing, eighteenth and nine- 
teenth century forms, ear training, sight-singing, dictation, rhythmic skills, and keyboard 
harmony. Offered in fall. P~MUS 172. 

174. Music Theory IV. (4h) Expanded harmony and techniques from Impressionism to the pres- 
ent. New concepts of style and form. Ear training, sight-singing, dictation, rhythmic skills, and 
keyboard harmony. Offered in spring. P — MUS 173. 

181. Music History I. (3h) History of western art music from the ancient Greeks to 1750. It is 
recommended that students take MUS 171 before enrolling in MUS 181. Reading knowledge of 
music is essential. Offered in fall. (D) 

182. Music History II. (3h) History of western art music from 1750 to World War I. It is recom- 
mended that students take MUS 171 and 181 before enrolling in MUS 182. Reading knowledge 
of music is essential. Offered in spring. (D) 

183. Music History III. (3h) History of western art music from the beginning of the twentieth 
century to the present day and its associations with other cultures and disciplines. It is recom- 
mended that students take MUS 171, 181, and 182 before enrolling in MUS 183. Reading knowl- 
edge of music is essential. Offered in fall. (D) 

203. History of Jazz. (3h) Survey of American jazz from its origin to the present. (D) 

207. American Music. (3h) Study of the musical sources of American culture and the six streams 
of music in the U.S.: folk and ethnic musics, offsprings of the rural South (country music, blues, 
rock), jazz and its forerunners, popular sacred music, popular secular music, and art music. 
(CD, D) 

208. Women and Music. (3h) Historical overview of women musicians in society. (CD, D) 

209. Music of World Cultures. (3h) Survey of music in selected societies around the world. Topics 
selected from the following areas of concentration: India, East Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, west- 
em Europe, Latin America, and vernacular music of the United States (including jazz). Students 
complete a project or projects on the technical or theoretical aspects of the music of world 
cultures. Designed for music majors and minors. Credit cannot be received for both 

MUS 109 and 209. P— MUS 172 or POL (CD, D) 

210. Survey of Latin-American Music. (3h) Survey of art, folk, and popular musical styles in Latin 
America and their impact on music of other cultures. Divided into three areas of study: the 
Caribbean, Central America, and South America. (CD, D) 



MUSIC ;|^g9 



212. Music in the Church. (3h) Function of church musicians and the relationship of their work to 
the church program. Offers to musician and non-musician alike historical overview, hymnody 
survey and other church music-related topics through class and guest lectures and practical 
seminars. Offered fall semester of odd years. P — POI. 

213. Beethoven. (3h) Compositional process, analysis, criticism, and performance practices in 
selected works by Ludwig van Beethoven. P — MUS 101 or POI. (D) 

21 5. Philosophy of Music. (3h) Survey of philosophical writings about music. Musical aesthetics; 
social, religious, and political concerns. 

220. Seminar in Music History. (3h) Intensive study of a selected topic in music history. 
P— MUS 174, 181, 182, 183, or POI. 

231. The World of Musical Instruments. (3h) Historical survey of musical instruments by families. 
Instruments of Western art music, selected world cultures, and vernacular music of the U.S., as 
well as electronic instruments. Emphasis on the cultural, sociological, and technological as well 
as the musical aspects of instruments. Students complete a project or projects on the technical 
or theoretical aspects of instruments. Designed for music majors or minors. Credit cannot be 
received for both MUS 131 and 231. P— MUS 171 or POI. (D) 

272. Performance and Analysis. (1.5h) Practical analysis for use in research and performance 
preparation. P— MUS 174 or POI. 

273. Composition. (Ih or 1.5h) Individual instruction in the craft of musical composition. May 
be repeated for credit. P — POI. 

280. Orchestration. (3h) Study of the orchestral and wind band instruments, how composers 
have used them throughout history, and the development of practical scoring and manuscript 
skills. Offered in spring. P— MUS 174, 182, 183, or POI. 

282. Conducting. (3h) Study of choral and instrumental conducting techniques. P — MUS 174 
or POI. 

284. Music Literature Seminar. (3h) Survey of repertoire, including an examination of teaching 
materials in the student's special area of interest. (D) 

a. Orchestral Literature d. Guitar Literature 

b. Choral Literature e. Vocal Literature 

c. Piano Literature f Opera 

285. Special Topics in Music. (l-3h) Intensive study of a selected subject chosen by faculty prior 
to the term in which the course is offered. May be repeated if course content differs. P — POI. 

307. American Foundations. (3h) Interdisciplinary study of American art, music, literature, and 
social history with particular reference to the art collection at Reynolda House Museum of 
American Art. Lectures, discussions, field trips, including a tour of New York City museums. 
Term project in American music. Also listed as ART 331, HST 349, and HON 393, 394. Offered at 
Reynolda House in summer only. 

Independent Study, Senior Project, and Honors Project 

298. Independent Study. (1.5h, 3h) Project in an area of study not otherwise available in the 
department. By pre-arrangement with department chair. 



190 



MUSIC 



397. Senior Project. (3h) Writing and public presentation of a major composition, research paper, 
music analysis, or conducting endeavor, according to criteria on file in the department. A stu- 
dent may not receive credit for both MUS 397 and 398. By prearrangement. 

398, Senior Honors Project. (3h) Writing and public presentation of a major composition, 
research paper, music analysis, or conducting endeavor, according to criteria on file in the 
department. A student may not receive credit for both MUS 397 and 398. P — Faculty selection 
for Honors in Music. 

Ensemble 

Departmental ensembles are open to all students on the basis of one hour per semester of par- 
ticipation in each ensemble, except as noted. Neither MUS 128 nor MUS 129 may count for the 
music majors or minor. All classes in this section may be repeated for credit. 

111. Opera Workshop. Study, staging, and performance of standard and contemporary operatic 
works. P— POL 

112. Collegium Musicum Instrumental. Ensemble stressing the performance practices and the 
performance of music of the medieval. Renaissance, and Baroque eras. 

113. Orchestra. Study and performance of orchestral works from the classical and contemporary 
repertoire. P — Audition. 

114. Collegium Musicum Vocal. Ensemble stressing the performance practices and the perfor- 
mance of music of the medieval. Renaissance, and Baroque eras. P — Audition. 

115. Concert Choir. Select touring choir of forty-five voices which performs a variety of choral 
literature from all periods. P — Audition. 

116. Choral Union. A large, mixed chorus which performs a variety of choral literature from all 
periods. P — Audition. 

118. Wind Ensemble. Study and performance of music for mixed chamber ensemble of winds, 
brass, and percussion. P — Audition. 

119. Symphonic Band. (Ih) Study and performance of music for symphonic band. Meets once 
weekly for ninety minutes. Performs on campus. 

120. Small Chamber Ensemble. Study and performance of music for small ensemble. Performers 
are strongly urged to participate in a larger ensemble as well. P — POI. 

a. percussion ensemble e. brass 

b. flute choir /.woodwind 

c. string g. guitar 

d. saxophone h. mixed 

121. Jazz Ensemble. Study and performance of written and improvised jazz for a twenty- 
member ensemble. 

1 28. Athletic Band I. Performs at most football games and men's and women's home basketball 
games. Meets twice weekly. Regular performances on and off campus. Offered in fall. 

1 29. Athletic Band II. (0.5h) Performs at men's and women's home basketball games, and at 
the spring football game. Class held once weekly. Meets from the beginning of the semester to 
spring break. P— MUS 128 or POI. 

MUSIC Y^i 



Performance Study 



Courses in individual instruction are open to students with the permission of the instructor on 
a space available-basis. Students in individual instruction who do not have basic knowledge of 
notation and rhythm are advised to enroll in MUS 104 either prior to or in conjunction with in- 
dividual instruction. (See the fee section of this bulletin for specific information regarding cost.) 
All classes in this section may be repeated for credit unless noted. 

108. Alexander Technique for Musical Performers. (0.5h) Educational process that uses verbal and 
tactile feedback to teach improved use of the student's body by identifying and changing poor 
and inefficient habits that cause stress, fatigue, and pain in the musical performer. Designed to 
teach the performer to minimize physical effort and maximize expression. Meets two hours per 
week. Pass/Fail only. 

122. Music Theatre Practicum. (Ih) For musicians who perform in a departmentally-sponsored 
theatrical production (when their performance is not as a member of a departmental ensemble). 
May not be counted toward the majors or minor in music. Credit may be earned in a given se- 
mester for either MUS 122 or THE 283, but not both. Course may be repeated for no more than 
four hours. Pass /Fail only. P — POI. 

123. Woodwind Doubling. (Ih) Practical skills for woodwind instrumentalists who participate in 
musical theatre productions for which expertise on more than one instrument is required. 

161. Individual Instruction. (0.5h) Technical studies and repertoire of progressive difficulty 
selected to meet the needs and abilities of the student. One half-hour lesson per week. Does 
not fulfill the individual instruction requirements for the major in music performance. May be 
repeated for credit. P — POI. 



a. violin 

b. viola 

c. cello 

d. bass 

e. flute 

f. oboe 

g. clarinet 



h. bassoon 
i. saxophone 
j. trumpet 
k. French horn 
I. trombone 
m. baritone 
n. tuba 



0. organ 
p. piano 
cj. percussion 
r. guitar 
s. harp 



u. accompanying 
V. voice 
IV. recorder 
X. viola da gamba 
y. harpsichord 



t. electric bass z. jazz improvisation 



162. Individual Instruction. (Ih) One one-hour lesson per week. Does not fulfill the individual in- 
struction requirements for the major in music performance. May be repeated for credit. P — POI. 

165j. Brass Rudiments. (0.5h) Introduction to the fundamentals of playing brass instruments. 
Designed for students with musical experience as well as begirmers with no prior musical train- 
ing. Offered in spring. P — POI. 

165p. Class Piano. (0.5h) Scales, chords, inversions, and appropriate repertoire, with emphasis 
on sight-reading, harmonization, and simple transposition. Designed for the beginning piano 
student. 

1 65q. Class Percussion. (0.5h) Introduction to the fundamentals of playing percussion instru- 
ments. Includes an introduction to reading music as well as basic techniques on instruments of 
the percussion family. P — POI. 



192 



MUSIC 



165r. Class Guitar I. (0.5h) For beginner students. Introduction to finger style guitar techniques: 
strumming, plucking, arpeggios and damping. Reading and playing from musical notation. 
Nylon string guitar is required. 

166r. Class Guitar II. (0.5h) Continuation of finger style guitar techniques with emphasis on 
chordal progressions, scales, accompanying patterns and sight-reading. Nylon string guitar is 
required. P — MUS 165r. 

165v. Class Voice I. (0.5h) Introduction to the fundamental principles of singing, concepts of 
breath control, tone, and resonance. P — POL 

166v. Class Voice II. (0.5h) Continuation of fundamental vocal techniques. P — MUS 165v or POI. 

166p. Class Piano II. (0.5h) Continuation of fundamental piano techniques. P — MUS 165p or POI. 

167v. Theatrical Singing I: Class Voice. (0.5h) Basic techniques of singing, breath control, phona- 
tion, and resonance, with emphasis on theatrical projection. Study and performance of musical 
theatre repertoire. (One hour per week.) P — POI. 

168v, Theatrical Singing II: Class Voice. (0.5h) Continuation of theatrical singing techniques with 
increased study and performance of musical theatre repertoire. P — MUS 167v or POI. (One 
hour per week.) 

1 75v. Advanced Voice Class. (Ih) Development of advanced vocal technique and repertoire. Lim- 
ited to eight students. Two hours per week; may be repeated. P — MUS 166v or POI. 

177v. Advanced Theatrical Singing. (Ih) Development of advanced theatrical singing technique 
and performance of musical theatre repertoire. Limited to eight students. Two hours per week; 
may be repeated. P— MUS 168v or POI. 

1 90. Diction for Singers. (1.5h) Study of articulation in singing, with emphasis on modification of 
English; pronunciation of Italian, German, and French. Development of articulatory and aural 
skills with use of the international phonetic alphabet. Individual performance and coaching in 
class. (Two hours per week.) May not be repeated for credit. 

262. Individual Instruction. (1.5h) One one-hour lesson per week. Fulfills the individual instruc- 
tion requirements for the major in music performance. May be repeated for credit. P — Two 
hours of MUS 161 and/or 162, plus successful completion of the audition for the major in musi- 
cal performance, and POI. 

362. Senior Recital. (3h) Preparation and public performance of a recital. Fulfills the individual 
instruction requirements for the major in music performance. To be taken only during the se- 
nior year. A student may not receive credit for both MUS 362 and 363. A student may not enroll 
in MUS 262 and 362 in the same semester. May not be repeated for credit. P — Two semesters of 
MUS 262 and POI. 

363. Senior Honors Recital. (3h) Preparation and public performance of a recital at the honors 
level. Fulfills the individual instruction requirements for the major in music performance. To be 
taken only during the senior year. A student may not receive credit for both MUS 362 and 363. 
A student may not enroll in MUS 262 and 363 in the same semester. May not be repeated for 
credit. P — Two semesters of MUS 262, POI, and faculty selection for honors in music performance. 



193 



Neuroscience (NEW 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 

Coordinator Professor of Biology Wayne L. Silver 

The neuroscience minor provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the nervous 
system. Neuroscientists study how we learn, process and remember information from the 
molecular to the philosophical level, and examine subjects ranging from the molecular pharma- 
cology of brain function to the mind-body problem. 

The minor requires a minimum of seventeen hours, nine of which must include NEU 200, 
201, 300, 391 described below. At least one semester of research in neuroscience is required 
for the minor (NEU 391). The research can be conducted on the Reynolda Campus or with 
investigators at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine. The research project must be 
approved by a member of the neuroscience minor faculty. Eight hours must come from the 
elective courses listed below. One of the elective courses must come from outside the student's 
major department. 

Additional elective courses may have been approved since publication of this bulletin. The 
program coordinator maintains a complete list of all approved elective courses. For course 
descriptions, see the relevant department's listings in this publication. 

200. Introduction to Neuroscience. (3h) Interdisciplinary course taught by faculty representing 
several fields. Topics include neurophysiology, sensory biology, motor mechanisms, neurophar- 
macology, cognitive neuroscience, perception, neural networks, and the philosophy of mind. 

201. Neuroscience Laboratory. (Ih) Examines principles of neuroscience ranging from the mo- 
lecular and cellular to the behavioral and cognitive. Lab — three hours. C — NEU 200. 

300. Neuroscience Seminar. (3h) Consideration of current neuroscience topics. Presentations of 
current research by faculty on the Reynolda Campus or the Wake Forest University School of 
Medicine. Readings from the primary literature accompany the presentations. P — NEU 200. 

391. Research in Neuroscience. (2h) Supervised independent laboratory investigation in neuro- 
science. 

392, 393, 394. Research in Neuroscience. (2h) Continued supervised independent laboratory 
investigation in neuroscience. Not to be counted toward the minor. P — NEU 200. 

Electives for Neuroscience 

BIO 323. Animal Behavior. (4h) 

324. Hormones and Behavior. (3h) 

325. Chronobiology. (3h) 
346. Neurobiology. (4h) 

351. Vertebrate Physiology. (4h) 

352. Developmental Neuroscience (4h) 
354. Vertebrate Endocrinology. (3h) 
364. Sensory Biology. (4h) 



194 



NEUROSCIENCE 



CSC 371. Artificial Intelligence. (3h) 

HES 312. Exercise and Health Psychology. (3h) 

350. Human Physiology. (3h) 
PHI 365. Philosophy, Mental Health, and Mental Disorder. (3h) 

374. Philosophy of Mind. (3h) 
PHY 307. Biophysics. (3h) 
PSY 320. Physiological Psychology. (3h) 

322. Psychopharmacology. (3h) 

323. Animal Behavior. (3h) 

326. Learning Theory and Research. (3h) 

329. Perception. (3h) 

331. Cognition. (3h) 

333. Motivation of Behavior. (3h) 

(Note that many of these courses have prerequisites, in some cases including introductory 
biology, psychology, or chemistry.) 

Philosophy (PHI) 

Chair Ralph Kennedy 

A,C. Reid Professor George Graham 

Professors Thomas K. Hearn Jr., Ralph Kennedy, Charles M. Lewis 

Associate Professor Win-chiat Lee 

Assistant Professors Adrian Bardon, Stavroula Glezakos, Christian Miller, PatrickToner 

Lecturers Hannah M. Hardgrave, Clark Thompson 

Adjunct Professor Adriano Raima 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Avram Hiller 

Visiting Professor Gilead Bar-Elli 

Visiting Instructor Nancy Lawrence 

Philosophy examines such topics as consciousness, knowledge, justice, free-will, good and evil, 
and the nature of religious experience and belief. The great philosophers have defended com- 
prehensive views that illuminate these topics in imaginative and powerful ways. The study of 
these views and of the reasoning offered in their support is valuable in itself; it is also valuable 
as a means of developing analytical, critical, and imaginative skills useful in the study of most 
other subjects, in the pursuit of careers as varied as law, business, science, education, and the 
arts, and in effective participation in civic life. 

The major in philosophy requires twenty-seven hours. These must include three hours in An- 
cient Greek philosophy (232, 331, or 332), three hours in Modem philosophy (241, 341, or 342), 
three hours chosen from 360, 361, 362, 363, 364, or 365, and three hours chosen from 370, 372, 
373, 374, 375, 376, or 377. Only one of 220 and 221 (Logic and Symbolic Logic) may be counted 
towards the major. No more than six hours of 100-level courses may be cotmted towards the 
major. No more than three hours of independent study may be counted towards satisfaction of 
the major requirements, and at least twenty-one hours of the major must be completed at Wake 
Forest; exceptions require approval by the department chair. 

Majors intending to do graduate study in philosophy are strongly advised to take the fol- 

PHILOSOPHY 295 



lowing courses: Ethics (360), Symbolic Logic (221), and at least one of Epistemology (376) or 
Metaphysics (377). Such majors should work closely with their major adviser as they consider 
their additional course choices. 

The minor in philosophy requires fifteen hours. At least nine of these hours must be earned in 
courses taken at Wake Forest at the 200-level or higher. Only one of 220 and 221 (Logic and 
Symbolic Logic) may be counted towards the minor. Students interested in minoring in philoso- 
phy should consult with the department about choosing an appropriate sequence of courses. 

Honors. Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to participate in the honors pro- 
gram in philosophy. Completion of fifteen hours in philosophy courses is prerequisite to begin- 
ning work in the honors program. Graduation with Honors in Philosophy requires successful 
completion of Honors I and II (391 and 392), a grade point average at the time of graduation of 
at least 3.3 in philosophy and 3.0 overall, and completion and successful defense of an honors 
thesis in an oral examination conducted by at least two members of the department. The hours 
earned in 391 and 392 do not count towards the twenty-seven hours required of all majors. 

Any three-hour philosophy course numbered 221 or lower counts towards satisfying the Divi- 
sion I requirement. Courses taken elsewhere after a student has enrolled at Wake Forest Univer- 
sity will not count towards satisfying the Division I requirement in philosophy. 

111. Basic Problems of Philosophy. (3h) Examination of the basic concepts of several representa- 
tive philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of knowledge, persons, God, mind, 
and matter. (D) 

112. Introduction to Philosophical Ideas. 3h) How and why does philosophy engage religious 
belief and common sense? How and why do modern skepticism, naturalism, and existentialism 
abandon the purposive world of Plato and Aristotle? How do contemporary concepts of self 
and world relate to these opposing conceptions of life, love, and meaning? (D) 

113. Knowledge and Reality. (3h) Examination of three interconnected philosophic problems: the 
nature of existence; the distinction between truth and falsity; and the question of what it means 
to know. (D) 

114. Philosophy of Human Nature. (3h) A study of selected topics bearing on human nature, such 
as free will and determinism, the relation of mind and body, personal identity and personhood, 
and immortality. (D) 

1 1 5. Introduction to Philosophy of Religion. (3h) A study of some cential issues in the philosophy 
of religion, such as arguments for and against the existence of God; faith and reason; the divine 
attributes; the nature and existence of the soul; the possibility of immortality; and religious 
diversity. (D) 

160. Introduction to Moral and Political Philosophy. (3h) Examination of basic concepts and prob- 
lems in moral and political thought, including questions of right and wrong, virtue, equality, 
justice, individual rights, and the common good. (D) 

161. Medical Ethics. (3h) Study of moral problems in the practice of medicine, including in- 
formed consent, experimentation on human subjects, tiuthtelling, confidentiality, abortion, and 
the allocation of scarce medical resources. (D) 



196 



PHILOSOPHY 



163. Environmental Ethics. (3h) Examination of ethical issues concerning the environment as 
they arise in individual lives and public policy. Issues are discussed in the context of funda- 
mental questions regarding the adequacy of traditional philosophical frameworks for thinking 
about the relationship between humans and the nonhuman world and the value and moral 
status of the nonhuman world. (D) 

164. Contemporary Moral Problems. (3h) A study of pressing ethical issues in contemporary life, 
such as abortion, euthanasia, animal rights, affirmative action, marriage, cloning, pornography, 
and capital punishment. (D) 

220. Logic. (3h) Elementary study of the laws of valid inference, recognition of fallacies, and 
logical analysis. (D) 

221 . Symbolic Logic. (3h) Basic concepts and techniques of first-order logic; applications of first- 
order logic to arguments expressed in English; some discussion of such topics as the unsolv- 
ability of the decision problem for first-order logic, the completeness of first-order logic, and 
Godel's incompleteness theorem. (D) 

232. Ancient Greek Philosophy. (3h) A study of the central figures in early Greek philosophy, 
beginning with the Presocratics, focusing primarily on Plato and Aristotle, and concluding with 
a brief survey of some Hellenistic philosophers. P — One PHI course or POI. 

237. Medieval Philosophy. (3h) A survey of some major philosophers from Augustine to Suarez, 
including Anselm, Averroes, Maimonides, Avicenna, Aquinas, Scotus and Ockham. P — One 
PHI course or POI. 

241 . Modern Philosophy. (3h) A study of the works of influential seventeenth- and eighteenth- 
century European philosophers such as Descartes, Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, and Hume, with a 
concentration on theories of knowledge and metaphysics. P — One PHI course or POI. 

331. Plato. (3h) Detailed analysis of selected dialogues, covering Plato's most important con- 
tributions to moral and political philosophy, theory of knowledge, metaphysics, and theology. 
P— One PHI course or POI. 

332. Aristotle. (3h) Study of the major texts, with emphasis on metaphysics, ethics, and theory of 
knowledge. P — One PHI course (232 or 331 strongly recommended) or POI. 

341. Kant, (3h) A study of Kant's principal contributions to metaphysics and the theory of 
knowledge. P — One PHI course (241 strongly recommended) or POI. 

342. Topics in Modern Philosophy, (3h) Treatment of selected figures and/or themes in seven- 
teenth- and eighteenth-century European philosophy. P — One PHI course (241 strongly recom- 
mended) or POI. 

350. The Main Streams of Chinese Philosophy and Religion. (3h) Introduction to the most im- 
portant traditions in Chinese philosophy and religion: Confucianism, Daoism (Taoism), and 
Chinese Buddhism or Chinese Chan (Zen) Buddhism. Also listed as REL 380. 

352. Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche. (3h) Examination of selected sources embodying the 
basic concepts of Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche, especially as they relate to each other 
in terms of influence, development, and opposition. P — One PHI course (241 strongly recom- 
mended) or POI. 



PHILOSOPHY 



197 



354. Wittgenstein. (3h) A study of the work of Ludwig Wittgenstein on such topics as the picttire 
theory of meaning, truth, skepticism, private languages, thinking, feeling, the mystical, and the 
ethical. P — One PHI course (221 strongly recommended) or POL 

355. Contemporary Philosophy. (3h) Study of the principal works of several representative twen- 
tieth-century philosophers. P — One PHI course (221 strongly recommended) or POI. 

360. Ethics. (3h) Systematic examination of central ethical theories in the Western philosophical 
tradition. Such theories include Kantian deontology, utilitarianism, Aristotelian virtue ethics, 
and divine command theory. P — One PHI course or POI. 

361. Topics in Ethics. (1.5h, 3h) P— One PHI course or POI. 

362. Social and Political Philosophy. (3h) A systematic examination of the work of selected 
contemporary and traditional philosophers on topics such as the state, the family, distributive 
justice, property, liberty, and the common good. P — One PHI course or POI. 

363. Philosophy of Law. (3h) Inquiry into the nature of law and its relation to morality. Class- 
room discussions of readings from the works of classical and modern authors focus on issues 
of contemporary concern involving questions of legal principle, personal liberty, human rights, 
responsibility, justice, and punishment. P — One PHI course or POI. 

364. Freedom, Action, and Responsibility. (3h) Study of the nature of human freedom and related 
matters in the philosophy of action, metaphysics, and moral philosophy. P — One PHI course 

or POI. 

365. Philosophy, Mental Health, and Mental Disorder. (3h) Examination of a wide range of philo- 
sophical problems associated with the distinction between mental health and illness, such as: 
personal responsibility, self-identity, and rationality. Special attention is given to moral dilem- 
mas posed by psychiatric classification and treatment and to clinical cases. P — One PHI course 
or POI. 

370. Philosophy and Christianity. (3h) Examination of the philosophical foundations of Christian 
thought and belief. Christian concepts of God and life everlasting, tiinity, incarnation, atone- 
ment, prayer, sin, evil and obligation. P — One PHI course or POI. 

372. Philosophy of Religion. (3h) Analysis of the logic of religious language and belief, including 
an examination of religious experience, mysticism, revelation, and argixments for the nature 
and existence of God. P — One PHI course or POI. 

373. Philosophy of Science. (3h) Systematic and critical examination of major views concerning 
the methods of scientific inquiry, and the bases, goals, and implications of the scientific conclu- 
sions which result from such inquiry. P — One PHI course or POI. 

374. Philosophy of Mind. (3h) Selection from the following topics: the mind-body problem; 
personal identity; the unity of consciousness; minds and machines; the nature of experience; 
action, intention, and the will. P — One PHI course or POI. 

375. Philosophy of Language. (3h) Study of such philosophical issues about language as truth 
and meaning, reference and description, proper names, indexicals, modality, tense, the semanti- 
cal paradoxes, and the differences between languages and other sorts of sign-systems. Also 
listed as LIN 375. P — One PHI course (221 stiongly recommended) or POI. 



198 



PHILOSOPHY 



376. Epistemology. (3h) The sources, scope and structure of human knowledge. Topics include: 
skepticism; perception, memory, and reason; the definition of knowledge; the nature of justifica- 
tion; theories of truth. P — One PHI course or POL 

377. Metaphysics. (3h) A survey of such issues as the nature and existence of properties, pos- 
sibility and necessity, time and persistence, causation, freedom and determinism, and dualism 
versus materialism about the human person. P — One PHI course or POI. 

385. Seminar. (1.5h, 3h) Offered by members of the faculty on specialized topics of their choice. 
With permission, may be repeated for credit. P — POI. 

391. Honors I. (1.5h) Directed study and research in preparation for writing an honors thesis. 
P — Admission to the honors program in philosophy. 

392. Honors II. (1.5h) Completion of the honors thesis begun in PHI 391. Graduation with honors 
in philosophy requires successful defense of the honors thesis in an oral examination conducted 
by at least two members of the department. P — PHI 391. 

395. Independent Study. (1.5h, 3h) 



Physics (PHY) 

Chair George Eric Matthews 

Reynolds Professor of Computational Biophysics Jacquelyn S. Fetrow 

Reynolds Professor Richard T. Williams 

Professors Paul R. Anderson, Keith D. Bonin, Natalie A. W. Holzwarth, William C. Kerr, 

Daniel Kim-Shapiro, George Eric Matthews 

Research Associate Professor Kamil Burak Ocer 

Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Fellow and Associate Professor Gregory B. Cook 

Associate Professors Eric D. Carlson, David L Carroll 

Assistant Professors Martin Guthold, Jed Macosko, Fred Salsbury 

Adjunct Professor Mark W. Roberson 

Adjunct Associate Professor John D. Bourland, Peter Santago 

Adjunct Assistant Professors Janna Levin, Timothy E. Miller 

Visiting Assistant Professor Forrest Charnock 

The program for each student majoring in physics is developed through consultation with the 
student's major adviser and may lead to either a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science degree. 
The bachelor of arts degree requires a minimum of basic physics courses and allows a wide 
selection of electives related to the student's interests in other disciplines, such as medicine, law, 
and business. The bachelor of science degree is designed for students planning careers in physics. 

The bachelor of arts degree in physics requires twenty-five hours in physics and must include 
the following courses: 111 or 113, 114, 215, 230, 262, 265, and 266. The remaining six hours may 
be satisfied with any other 300-level courses in the department except 381 and 382. MTH 251 
also is required. Depending on what other physics courses the student takes, additional math- 
ematics courses may be required; e.g., MTH 301 is a prerequisite for PHY 339. 

The bachelor of science degree in physics requires thirty-eight hours in physics and must include 
the following courses: 111 or 113, 114, 215, 230, 262, 265, 266, 301, 302, 337, 339, 340, 343, 344, 

PHYSICS ;^99 



and 351. The remaining hours may be satisfied with any other 300-level course in the depart- 
ment. In addition, MTH 251, 301, 302, and either 304 or 352 are required; MTH 303 and CSC 111 
are strongly recommended. 

The bachelor of arts degree in physics with concentration in biophysics and biochemistry requires 
27.5 hours in physics and must include the following courses: 111 or 113, 114, 215, 230, 262, 265, 
266, and two of the following: 307/325, 320/323, 351. A student must take PHY 381 or 382 for a 
minimum of 1.5 hours. Also required are MTH 251; CHM 111/lllL, 122/122L, 230; two of the 
three courses BIO 112, 213, 214; one of the four courses BIO 370, BIO 371, CHM 370, CHM 371. 

While the physics major can be started in the sophomore year, students are encouraged to take 
PHY 113 and 114 and MTH 111 and 112 in the first year. If this sequence is followed, the physics 
major may be completed with considerable flexibility in exercising various options, such as the 
five-year BS/MS program. If physics is not taken in the first year, the degree requirements in 
physics may still be completed by the end of the senior year if a beginning course is taken in the 
sophomore year. A candidate for the 3-2 engineering program would also complete three years 
of the bachelor of science physics major program prior to transfer. (Consult the chair of the 
department for additional information on these five-year programs.) 

No student may be a candidate for a degree with a major in physics with a grade less than C 
in General Physics without special permission of the department. 

Honors. Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
honors program in physics through the major adviser. To be graduated with the designation 
"Honors in Physics," students must pass PHY 381, write a paper on the results of the research 
in that course, pass an oral exam on the research and related topics given by a committee of 
three physics faculty members, and obtain a grade point average of at least 3.5 in physics and 
3.0 overall. 

A minor in physics requires seventeen hours, which must include the courses 111 or 113, 114, 
215, and 262. Students interested in the minor should advise the faculty member responsible for 
advising physics majors. (Inquire in Olin Physical Laboratory, Room 100.) 

Physics courses satisfying Division V requirements must be taken at Wake Forest. Satisfactory 
completion of the laboratory work is required for a passing grade in all courses with a laboratory. 

1 05. Descriptive Astronomy. (3h) Introductory study of the universe, from the solar system to the 
galaxies. No lab. 

1 09. Astronomy. (4h) Introductory study of the universe consisting of descriptive astronomy, the 
historical development of astronomical theories, and astrophysics. Knowledge of basic algebra 
and trigonometry is required. Lab — two hours. (D) 

110. Introductory Physics. (4h) Conceptual, non-calculus one-semester survey of the essentials 
of physics, including mechanics, wave motion, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, and 
modern physics. Not recommended for premedical, mathematics, or science students. Credit 
allowed for only one of 110, 111, and 113. Lab — two hours. (D, QR) 

111. Mechanics, Waves, and Heat. (4h) Introduction to mechanics, wave motion, thermodynam- 
ics, and sound. Extensive use of algebra and trigonometry. Credit allowed for only one of 110, 
111, and 113. Lab— two hours. (QR) 



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PHYSICS 



113. General Physics I. (4h) Essentials of mechanics, wave motion, heat, and sound treated with 
some use of calculus. Recommended for science, mathematics, and premedical students. Credit 
allowed for only one of 110, 111, and 113. Lab — two hours. C — MTH 111 or equivalent. (D, QR) 

114. General Physics II. (4h) Essentials of electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics 
treated with some calculus. Recommended for science, mathematics, and premedical students. 
Lab— two hours. P— MTH 111 and PHY 111 or 113. (D, QR) 

120. Physics and Chemistry of the Environment. (4h) Covers the basic physical and chemical pro- 
cesses in the earth's atmosphere, biosphere, and the oceans. It consists of two parts: 1) chemical 
processes in the environment such as element cycles and the chemistry of pollutants in air and 
water and, 2) physical aspects of the environment such as solar energy and the atmosphere, and 
the physics of weather and climate. Lab — three hours. Also listed as CHM 120. (D, QR) 

215. Elementary Modern Physics. (3h) Development of twentieth-century physics and an intro- 
duction to quantum ideas. P— PHY 114 and MTH 111. C— PHY 265. (QR) 

230. Electronics. (3h) Introduction to the theory and application of transistors and electronic 
circuits. Lab— three hours. P— PHY 114. (QR) 

262. Mechanics. (3h) Study of the equations of motion describing several kinds of physical sys- 
tems: velocity-dependent forces; damped and forced simple harmonic motion; orbital motion; 
inertial and non-inertial reference frames; and relativistic mechanics. Includes extensive use of 
computers. P— PHY 113 and MTH 111 or equivalent. (QR) 

265, 266. Intermediate Laboratory. (Ih, Ih) Experiments on mechanics, modern physics, elec- 
tronics, and computer simulations. C— PHY 215 (for PHY 265); PHY 262 (for PHY 266). 
P— PHY 265 (for PHY 266). 

301, 302. Physics Seminar. (Oh, Oh) Discussion of contemporary research, usually with visiting 
scientists. Attendance required of junior and senior physics majors. 

307. Biophysics. (3h) Introduction to the structure, dynamic behavior, and function of DNA and 
proteins, and a survey of membrane biophysics. The physical principles of structure determina- 
tion by X-ray, ^sIMR, and optical methods are emphasized. Also listed as BIO 307. P — PHY 113, 
114 as well as BIO 112 or 214 or POL 

310. Extragalactic Astronomy and Cosmology. (3h) Topics include galactic structure, models for 
galaxies and galaxy formation, the large scale structure of the universe, the big bang model of 
the universe, physical processes such as nucleosynthesis in the early universe, and observa- 
tional cosmology. P— PHY 114, 215. 

320. The Physics of Macromolecules. (3h) Physics of large biologically important molecules, es- 
pecially proteins and nucleic acids. Topics include the physical basis of biomolecular structure, 
the energetics and statistical mechanics of biomolecular dynamics, and the electrostatics and 
solvation of biomolecules. Designed for students with biochemistry, chemistry, or physics back- 
grounds. P— PHY 351 or BIO 214 or CHM 341, PHY 113, 114, or POL 

323. Computational Biophysics Laboratory. (Ih) Application of techniques in molecular model- 
ing, including energy minimization, molecular dynamics simulation, and conformational analy- 
sis. C— PHY 320 or POL 



201 



325. Biophysical Methods Laboratory. (Ih) Experiments using various biophysical techniques 
such as electron paramagnetic resonance, atomic force microscopy, stopped-flow absorption 
spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction, and gel electrophoresis. C — PHY 307. 

337. Analytical Mechanics. (1.5h) The Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of mechanics 
with applications. Taught in the first half of the fall semester. P — PHY 262, MTH 251. 

339, 340. Electricity and Magnetism. (1.5h, 3h) Electrostatics, magnetostatics, dielectric and mag- 
netic materials. Maxwell's equations and applications to radiation, relativistic formulation. 
PHY 339 is taught in the second half of the fall semester, following PHY 337. PHY 340 is taught 
in the spring semester. These should be taken in sequence. P — PHY 114, MTH 251 and 301. 

341. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. (3h) Introduction to classical and statistical 
thermodynamics and distribution functions. Also listed as CHM 341. P — PHY 215 and 
MTH 111 and 112. . ^, 

343, 344. Quantum Physics. (3h, 3h) Application of the elementary principles of quantum 
mechanics to atomic, molecular, solid state, and nuclear physics. P — PHY 215 and MTH 251. 

352. Physical Optics and Optical Design. (4h) Interaction of light with materials; diffraction and 
coherent optics; ray trace methods of optical design. Lab — three hours. P — PHY 114, 215. 

354. Introduction to Solid State Physics. (3h) Survey of the structure, composition, physical prop- 
erties, and technological applications of condensed matter. P — PHY 343. 

361. Biophysics Seminar. (Ih) Seminal and current publications in biophysics are studied. Each 
week a member of the class makes an oral presentation on a chosen publication and leads the 
ensuing discussion. 

381, 382. Research. (1.5h/3h, 1.5h/3h) Library, conference, computation, and laboratory work 
performed on an individual basis. 

385. Bioinformatics. (3h) Introduction to bioinformatics and the language of computer program- 
ming and algorithm development in the field of biomedical research. Also listed as CSC 385. 
P — Introductory courses in biology, chemistry, and molecular biology or biochemistry or POL 

391, 392. Special Topics in Physics. (lh-4h) Courses in selected topics in physics. May be repeated 
if course content differs. 



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Political Science (POL) 

ChairKathy B.Smith 

Reynolds Professor of Latin-American Studies Luis Roniger 

Worrell Professor of Anglo-American Studies David Coates 

^Professors Katy J. Harriger, Charles H. Kennedy, Wei-chin Lee, Kathy B. Smith 

Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Fellow and Associate Professor Peter M. Siavelis 

Associate Professors John J. Dinan, David P. Weinstein, Helga A. Welsh, Pia Wood 

Assistant Professors Michaelle L. Browers, Pete Furia, Sarah Lischer, Bryan Shelly 

Adjunct Professor Richard D. Sears 

Senior Lecturer Yomi Durotoye 

Visiting Assistant Professor Tom Brister 

Visiting Instructors Alisa Kessel, Owen Yeates 

In its broadest conception, the aim of the study of political science is to understand the way in 
which policy for a society is formulated and executed and to understand the moral standards 
by which policy is or ought to be set. This center of interest is often described alternatively as 
the study of power, of government, of the state, or of human relations in their political context. 
For teaching purposes, the study of political science has been divided by the department into 
the following fields: (1) American politics, (2) comparative politics, (3) political theory, and 
(4) international politics. Introductory courses in these fields provide broad and flexible ap- 
proaches to studying political life. 

The major in political science consists of thirty-one hours, of which, in all but exceptional cases, 
at least twenty-one hours must be completed at Wake Forest. Where students take political 
science courses abroad, they have to be in Wake Forest approved programs and /or must have 
been certified by the department chair. The required courses for the major include the fol- 
lowing: (a) at least one non-seminar course in each of the four fields of political science listed 
above; (b) a course in political science methods (POL 280) normally taken in the junior year; and 
(c) one political science seminar course (POL 290) normally taken in the senior year. 

No more than six hours may be taken toward the major from introductory courses (100- 
level courses). Majors may not take the introductory courses during their senior year. Highly 
motivated students who would like to further expand or apply their study beyond the normal 
course of offerings can undertake internships, individual studies, or directed readings if they 
fulfill the minimum overall GPA requirements of 3.0. No more than three hours for any one or 
any combination of the following courses may be counted toward the major: POL 287, 288, or 
289. Transfer hours toward the major are awarded on an individual case-by-case basis at the 
discretion of the department chair. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in all courses com- 
pleted in political science at Wake Forest is required for graduation with the major. 

The senior seminar provides an opportunity for majors to experience something comparable 
to a graduate seminar. As such, it is conducted more by discussion than by lecture and enables 
students to read and reflect upon advanced scholarly material. The seminar also offers students 
the opportunity in their final year to create a research paper of greater length and sophistication 
than is customary and to develop the research and writing skills appropriate to the task. 

Honors. Students who write an outstanding seminar paper may be nominated for "Honors in 
Political Science" if they have a 3.3 overall grade point average and a 3.6 political science grade 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



203 



point average. In addition, the candidate's seminar paper must be defended before the depart- 
mental honors committee. For additional information department faculty members should be 
consulted. 

Five-Year BA/MA Degree. Political science majors who minor in Latin- American studies also 
have the opportunity to pursue a five-year cooperative BA/MA degree program at Georgetown 
University in Washington, DC. 

The minor in political science consists of eighteen hours. Fifteen of the hours must be taken at 
Wake Forest. No more than six hours may be taken toward the minor from introductory courses 
(100-level courses). Highly motivated students who would like to further expand or apply their 
study beyond the normal course of offerings can undertake internships, individual studies, 
or directed readings if they fulfill the minimum GFA requirements of 3.0. No more than three 
hours for any one or any combination of the following courses may be counted toward the mi- 
nor: POL 287, 288, or 289. Transfer hours toward the minor are awarded on an individual case- 
by-case basis at the discretion of the chair. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in all courses 
completed in political science at Wake Forest is required for graduation with the minor. 

A student who selects political science to fulfill the Division IV requirement must take one of 
the following courses: POL 113, 114, 115, or 116. Students who are not majors in political science 
may take upper-level courses as electives without having had lower-level courses, vmless a 
prerequisite is specified. 

American Politics 

113. American Government and Politics. (3h) The nature of politics, political principles, and 
political institutions, with emphasis on their application to the U.S. (D) 

210. Topics in U.S. Politics and Policy. (Ih or 3h) Intensive study of one or more major problems 
in contemporary U.S. politics and policy. Course may be retaken for credit if topic varies. 

21 1 . Political Parties, Voters, and Elections. (3h) Examination of party competition, party orga- 
nizations, the electorate and electoral activities of parties, and the responsibilities of parties for 
governing. 

212. U.S. Policymaking in the Twenty-first Century. (3h) Examines the contemporary U.S. policy- 
making process. Special attention to ways issues become important and contributions of differ- 
ent political actors, institutions, and ideologies in the passage or rejection of policy proposals. 
Considers a range of social, economic, and regulatory policies. 

215. Citizen and Community. (3h) Examination of the role and responsibilities of citizens in 
democratic policymaking. Includes discussion of democratic theory, emphasis on a policy issue 
of national importance (i.e. poverty, crime, environment), and involvement of students in proj- 
ects that examine the dimension of the issue in their community. Service-learning course. j 

216. U.S. Social Welfare Policy. (3h) Analysis of U.S. social policymaking and policy outcomes on) 
issues such as welfare, education, health care, and Social Security, with emphasis on historical 
development and cross-national comparison. i 

217. Politics and the Mass Media. (3h) Exploration of the relationship between the political 
system and the mass media. Two broad concerns are the regulation of the mass media and the 
impact of media on political processes and events. Also listed as JOU 277. 



204 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



218. Congress and Policymaking. (3h) Examination of the composition, authority structures, 
external influences, and procedures of Congress with emphasis on their implications for policy- 
making in the U.S. 

219. Political Participation. (3h) Examination of political participation in the U.S., with emphasis 
on electoral and non-electoral avenues through which individuals and groups wield influence 
in politics and government, including voting, interest groups, and social movements. Service- 
learning course. 

220. The American Presidency. (3h) Emphasis on the office and the role; contributions by con- 
temporary presidents considered in perspective. 

221. State Politics. (3h) Examination of institutions, processes, and policies at the state level, 
with emphasis on the different patterns of governance in the various states and the conse- 
quences of the recent revitalization of state governments. 

222. Urban Politics. (3h) Political structures and processes in American cities and suburbs as 
they relate to the social, economic, and political problems of the metropolis. Service-learning 
course. (CD) 

223. Blacks in American Politics. (3h) Survey of selected topics, including black political partici- 
pation, political organizations, political leadership, and political issues. Shows the relationship 
of these phenomena to American political institutions and processes as a whole. 

225. American Constitutional Law: Separation of Powers and the Federal System. (3h) Analysis of 
Supreme Court decisions affecting the three branches of the national government and federal/ 
state relations. 

226. American Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties. (3h) Judicial interpretations of First Amend- 
ment freedoms, racial equality, and the rights of the criminally accused. Not open to first-year 
students. 

227. Politics, Law, and Courts. (3h) Analysis of the nature and role of law in American society 
and the structure and procedure of American courts. Questions of judicial organization, person- 
nel, and decision making, as well as the impact of law and court decisions on the social order, 
are explored at local, state, and national levels. 

228. The Politics of Public Education. (3h) Introduces students to some of the most popular and 
contentious contemporary education policy debates and discusses what the U.S. school system 
tells us about the country's fundamental political commitments. 

229. Women and Politics. (3h) Examines classical and contemporary arguments regarding the 
participation of women in politics, as well as current policy issues and changes in women's 
political participation. 

Comparative Politics 

114. Comparative Government and Politics. (3h) Analysis of political institutions, processes, and 
policy issues in selected countries. Case studies are drawn from Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin 
America. (CD, D) 

231. Western European Politics. (3h) Comparative analysis of political institutions, processes, 
and policy issues in selected West European countries. Special attention is given to case studies 
involving Great Britain, France, Germany, Italy and to the process of European integration. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



205 



232. Politics in Russia and Eastern Europe. (3h) Analysis of the political, economic, and social pat- 
terns of the region, emphasizing the internal dynamics of the political and economic transition 
processes currently underway. 

233. The Politics of Modern Germany. (3h) Study of the historical legacy, political behavior, and 
governmental institutions of contemporary Germany (newly unified Germany). 

234. United Kingdom Politics in a Global Age. (3h) Introduces the nature and content of contem- 
porary United Kingdom politics by placing those politics in a wider analysis of United King- 
dom history, society, and international positions. (CD) 

235. European Integration. (3h) Combines different approaches to the study of Europe by 
examining European integration — as highlighted by the development of the European Union — 
through the lenses of history, politics, culture, and economics. 

236. Government and Politics in Latin America. (3h) Comparative analysis of the institutions and 
processes of politics in the Latin American region. (CD) 

237. Comparative Public Policy in Selected Industrialized Democracies. (3h) Analysis of public 
policy choices involving such matters as health care, education, environment, and immigration 
in Western Europe and the U.S. 

238. Comparative Economic Development and Political Change. (3h) Overview of the relationship 
between economic development, socio-structural change, and politics since the creation of the 
international capitalist system in the sixteenth century. Organized around case studies of in- 
dustrialized democracies, evolving Communist systems and command economies, and "Third 
World" countries. 

239. State, Economy, and International Competitiveness. (3h) Introduces a range of important 
case studies of national economic performance and does so in such a manner as to illustrate the 
role of public policy in economic performance in a number of leading industrial economies (the 
U.S., United Kingdom, Germany, Sweden, and Japan). 

240. Human Rights in Latin America. (3h) Looks at the policy dilemmas that both restored and 
new democracies face when dealing with past human rights violations and how they engage in 
restructuring the domain of human rights in a changed global environment. Case studies focus 
primarily on Latin America within a comparative framework. (CD) 

242. Topics in Comparative Politics. (Ih or 3h) Intensive study of one or more major problems in 
contemporary comparative politics. Course may be retaken for credit if topic varies. 

244. Politics and Literature. (3h) Examination of how literature can extend knowledge of politics 
and political systems. Considers the insights of selected novelists. 

245. Ethnonationalism. (3h) Concerned with the role of ethnicity in world politics. Focuses on 
both theoretical and substantive issues relating to: (a) nature of ethnicity and ethnic group iden- 
tity; (b) sources of ethnic conflict; (c) politics of ethnic conflict; (d) policy management of ethnic 
conflict; and (e) international intervention in ethnic conflict. 

246. Politics and Policies in South Asia. (3h) Survey of major issues relevant to politics and policy 
in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. (CD) 

247. Islam and Politics. (3h) Explores the interrelationship of Islam and politics in the contem- 
porary world. Deals with Islam as a political ideology which shapes the structure of political 



206 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



institutions and behavior. Looks at Islam in practice by examining the interaction between 
Islam and the political systems of Iran, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and others. (CD) 

248. Chinese Politics. (3h) Survey of the political institutions and processes in China (People's 
Republic of China and Republic of China). Emphasizes group conflict, elites, ideology, as well 
as current policy changes in the process of modernization. 

International Politics 

116. International Politics. (3h) Survey of the forces that shape relations among states and some 
of the major problems of contemporary international politics. (CD, D) 

251. The Politics of Forced Migration. (3h) Addresses major questions about forced migration in 
international politics, such as: What causes people to flee their homes? What are the effects of 
forced displacement on the host communities? How should considerations of human rights and 
international law affect our understanding of forced migration? 

252. Topics in International Politics. (Ih or 3h) Intensive study of one or more major problems of 
contemporary international politics. Course may be retaken for credit if topic varies. 

253. International Political Economy. (3h) Analyzes major issues in the global political economy 
including theoretical approaches to understanding the tension between politics and econom- 
ics, monetary and trade policy, North-South relations, environmentalism, human rights and 
democratization. 

254. U.S. Foreign Policy: Contemporary Issues. (3h) Examines the most pressing issues in U.S. for- 
eign policy today, with attention to the historical and institutional context in which U.S. foreign 
policy is determined. 

255. Group Identity in International Relations. (3h) Examines the impact on international politics 
of nationalism, supranationalism, and globalism, with attention to the origins of group identi- 
ties and to contemporary trends. 

256. International Security. (3h) Explores various theoretical approaches to security studies and 
contemporary security issues, with special attention to domestic variables, the use of force, 
strategic culture, weapons of mass destruction, the political economy of national security, and 
terrorism. 

257. Interamerican Relations. (3h) Examines the history and contemporary challenges of rela- 
tions among the nations of the Americas, including intervention and sovereignty, migration, 
drugs, economic relations, and contemporary foreign policy. 

259. The Arab-Israeli Conflict. (3h) Analysis of factors influencing the relationship between Israel 
and its neighbors relative to fundamental aspects of U.S., Israeli, Palestinian, and Arab states 
policies. 

260. U.S. and East Asia. (3h) Analytical survey of U.S. interaction with East Asia, with emphasis 
on the strategic security and the political economy of the region. (CD) 

261. International Law. (3h) Analyzes major issues in public international law including sources 
of international law, state sovereignty, territorial jurisdiction, treaties, peaceful settlement of 
disputes, human rights, and the relationship between international law and domestic law. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 207 



262. International Organizations. (3h) Survey of the philosophy, principles, organizational struc- 
ture, and decision-making procedures of international organizations. In addition to the United 
Nations system, this course analyzes various international organizations in issues such as col- 
lective security, trade, economic development, human rights protection, and the environment. 

263. U.S. Foreign Policy in the Middle East. (3h) Critical analysis of U.S. foreign policy with respect 
to the Middle East since the second World War. Utilizes a case study method of instruction. 

264. Moral Dilemmas in International Politics. (3h) Examines moral dilemmas in international 
politics with reference to theories and cases. Topics include just war doctrine, responsibility of 
rich countries toward poor countries, exportability of capitalism and democracy, and legitimacy 
of humanitarian intervention. 

266. Civil Wars: Causes and Consequences. (3h) Examines and assesses competing theories of 
civil war, including economic, ethnic, religious, and ideological explanations. Addresses dilem- 
mas raised by civil war such as the spread of HIV /AIDS, the proliferation of private security 
companies, and the abuse of humanitarian aid. 

267. America in Vietnam: Myth and Reality. (3h) Analysis of American policy toward Vietnam, 
with special emphasis on the period of 1954-75. Focus is on the relationship between American 
policies and the problems posed by Vietnamese and American cultures. 

268. International Conflict Resolution. (3h) Explores various approaches to conflict resolution 
through readings, case studies, and simulations. Issues include negotiation and mediation, 
dealing with war criminals, tradeoffs between justice and peace, and the role of the interna- 
tional community. 

Political Theory 

115. Political Theory. (3h) Introduction to the cential concepts (democracy, liberty, equality, and 
power) and ideologies (liberalism, conservatism, and socialism) as they have been formulated 
within some of the main schools of political thought. (D) 

269. Topics in Political Theory. (Ih or 3h) Intensive study of one or more major topics in political 
theory. Course may be retaken for credit if topic varies. 

270. Ethics and Politics. (3h) Investigation of the relationship between ethical reasoning and 
political theory. Representative philosophers include Hume, Kant, Nietzsche, Mill, Sidgwick, 
Green, Ayer, Hare, and Mclntyre. 

271 . Classical Political Thought. (3h) Examination of the nature and goals of classical political 
theorizing, with attention to its origins in ancient Athens and its diffusion through Rome. 
Representative writers include Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero. 

272. Democratic Theory. (3h) Examination of the theoretical underpinnings of democracy 
and some of the critiques of those foundations. Focus is on understanding some of the major 
theories of democracy and on how key democratic concepts are defined differently within these 
various tiaditions. 

273. Marx, Marxism and the Aftermath of Marxism. (3h) Examination of Marx's indebtedness to 
Hegel, his early humanistic writings, and the vicissitudes of twentieth century vulgar Marxism 
and neo-Marxism in the works of Lenin, Lukacs, Korsch, Horkeimer, Marcuse, and Sartre. 



208 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



274. Religion and Politics in Medieval Thought. (3h) Investigation of the medieval encounter 
between philosophy and revealed religion (Islam, Judaism, and Christianity). Topics include the 
nature of political community and its role in cultivating virtue; relations between knowledge 
and power, and between politics and salvation; and the origins of modern ideas of law and 
freedom. 

275. American Political Thought. (3h) Examination of the republican, civic humanistic tradition 
vs. the liberal, juridical tradition in American political thought from the founding to the pres- 
ent. Readings from Locke, Sidney, the Federalists and anti-Federalists, Spencer, Dewey, Rawls, 
and Sandel. 

276. Modern Political Thought. (3h) Political thought from Machiavelli to the present, including 
such topics as moral and natural rights, positive and negative freedom, social conh-act theory, 
alienation and citizenship. Selected writings from Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, Marx, 
and Rawls. 

277. Feminist Political Thought. (3h) Introduction to feminist thought and its implications for the 
study and practice of political theory. Topics include feminist critiques of the Western political 
tradition and schools of feminist political theory. (CD) 

279. Varieties of Philosophical Liberalism. (3h) Study of twentieth-century philosophical liberal- 
ism such as libertarianism, utilitarianism, liberal utilitarianism, Kantian liberalism and com- 
murdtariarusm with special focus on rival conceptions of freedom and on utilitarianism and its 
critics. 



Seminars and Additional Courses 

280. Political Science Methods. (3h) Overview of the methods currently prominent in studying 
politics. Attention is given to the relationships between theory, method, and findings by focus- 
ing on the need to make empirical observation systematic. (QR) 

282. Gandhi. (3h) Explores the life, political philosophy, and the method of non-violent coercion 
(satyagraha) of Gandhi. Students define and implement group projects designed to promote 
change within the context of Gandhian methodology. Service-learning course. 

287. Individual Study. (2h or 3h) Intensive research leading to the completion of an analytical 
paper conducted under the direction of a faculty member. Students initiate the project and 
secure the permission of an appropriate instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of six 
hours, orJy three of which may count toward the major. P— POL 

288. Directed Reading. (2h or 3h) Concentrated reading in an area of study not otherwise 
available. Students initiate the project and secure the permission of an appropriate instructor. 
P— POL 

289. Internship in Politics. (2h or 3h) Field work in a public or private setting with related read- 
ings and an analytical paper under the direction of a faculty member. Students initiate the 
project and secure the permission of an appropriate instructor. Normally one course in an 
appropriate subfield is taken prior to the internship. P— POL 

290. Senior Seminar in Political Science. (4h) Readings and research on selected topics. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



209 



Psychology (PSY) 

Chair Dale Dagenbach 

William L Poteat Professor of Psychology Deborah L. Best 

Professors Robert C. Beck, Terry D. Blumenthal, Dale Dagenbach, 

Catherine E. Seta, Carol A. Shively 

Lee Faculty Fellow and Associate Professor Batja Mesquita 

Ollen R. Nalley Associate Professor William W. Fleeson 

Associate Professors Christy M. Buchanan, Janine M. Jennings, James A. Schirillo, 

Cecilia H. Solano, Eric R. Stone 

Assistant Professors R. Michael Furr, Lisa Kiang, Wayne E. Pratt 

Adjunct Professors Jay R. Kaplan, W. Jack Rejeski Jr., Frank B. Wood 

Adjunct Associate Professor C. Drew Edwards 

Adjunct Assistant Professors Phillip G. Batten, Julia Jackson-Newsom, 

Ann Peiffer, William W. Sloan Jr. 

Adjunct Instructors Stephen W. Davis, Tina M. Miyake 

Visiting Assistant Professors Janet Boseovski, Nicholas L Carnagey, 

Ashleigh D. Haire, Alycia K. Silman 

Psychology 151 is a prerequisite to all courses of a higher number. Courses numbered below 
151 do not count toward Division IV requirements or toward the major in psychology. Psy- 
chology 151 and all higher numbered courses except for PSY 270, 280, 282, and 392 count 
toward Division FV requirements. Psychology 310, 311, 312, or special permission of the 
instructor is prerequisite for some 300-level courses. See individual course descriptions for 
specific information. 

The major in psychology: It is recommended that students who are considering psychology as a 
major take PSY 151 in their first year and PSY 311 no later than their junior year. Furthermore, 
students should take at least one course in addition to PSY 151 before taking PSY 311. An aver- 
age of C or higher in psychology courses is required at the time the major is elected. The major 
in psychology requires the completion of a minimum of thirty-two hours in psychology, includ- 
ing 151, 311, 312, and 392. Students who have successfully completed 383 are not required to 
complete 392. In addition, the major student must complete at least one course from each of 
the two following groups: Group A: 320, 326, 329, 331, 333, 338; Group B: 341, 351, 355, 362, and 
374. No more than forty-two hours in psychology may be counted toward the graduation re- 
quirements of 120 hours. No more than three hours of directed study (PSY 280) or independent 
research (PSY 282) may be counted toward the thirty-two hours required for the major; up to a 
maximum of five hours may be counted with more than thirty-five hours in the major. 

No more than nine hours will be accepted for courses taken at other schools to be counted | 
toward the major. Courses taken at commimity colleges or college courses taught on high ' 

school campuses are not accepted for transfer credit. With the exception of PSY 151, specific 
courses required for the major must be taken at Wake Forest. The guidelines regarding transfer 
and credit approval may be modified in rare and special circumstances at the discretion of the 
psychology department chair. 

I 
The minor in psychology requires fifteen hours in psychology including: 151; either 310 or 311; 

and at least two of the following courses— 241, 245, 255, 260, 268, 320, 323, 326, 329, 331, 333, 



210 



PSYCHOLOGY 



338, 362 and 374. No more than six hours will be accepted for courses taken at other schools to 
be counted toward the minor. 

A minimum grade average of C on all courses attempted in psychology is required for 
graduation with either a major or minor in psychology. 

Honors. Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to participate in the honors 
program in psychology. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Psychology," the 
student must complete satisfactorily a special sequence of courses (381, 383), pass an oral or 
written examination, and earn an overall GPA of 3.2 with an average of 3.5 on work in psychol- 
ogy. In addition, the honors student normally has a non-credit research apprenticeship with a 
faculty member. For more detailed information, members of the departmental faculty should be 
consulted. (Students satisfactorily completing PSY 383 are not required to complete PSY 392.) 

100. Learning to Learn. (3h) Workshop designed primarily for first- and second-year students 
who wish to improve their academic skills through the application of basic principles of learn- 
ing, memory, organization, etc. Third- and fourth-year students by permission of the instructor 
only. Pass /Fail only. 

151. Introductory Psychology. (3h) Systematic survey of psychology as the scientific study of 
behavior. Prerequisite to all courses of a higher number. (D) 

239. Altered States of Consciousness. (3h) Examination of altered states of consciousness with 
special reference to sleep and dreams, meditation, hypnosis, and drugs. P — PSY 151. (D) 

241 . Developmental Psychology. (3h) Survey of physical, emotional, cognitive, and social devel- 
opment in humans from conception to death. P — PSY 151. (D) 

245. Survey of Abnormal Behavior. (3h) Study of problem behaviors such as depression, alco- 
hohsm, antisocial personality, the schizophrenias, and pathogenic personality patterns, with 
emphasis on causes, prevention, and the relationships of these disorders to normal lifestyles. 
P— PSY 151. (D) 

250. Psychology Abroad. (3h) Study of psychology in foreign countries. Content and travel plans 
vary from year to year depending upon interests of faculty and students. Usually offered in 
summer. P— PSY 151. (D) 

255. Personality. (3h) Survey of theory and research on the structure and function of human 
personality, with attention to the relationship to cognition, emotion, motivation, and behavior. 
P— PSY 151. (D) 

260. Social Psychology. (3h) Survey of the field, including theories of social behavior, interper- 
sonal attraction, attitudes and attitude change, and group behavior. P — PSY 151. (D) 

265. Human Sexuality. (3h) Exploration of the psychological and physiological aspects of human 
sexuality, with attention to sexual mores, sexual deviances, sexual dysfunction, and sex-related 
roles. P— PSY 151. (D) 

268. Industrial/Organization Psychology. (3h) Psychological principles and methods applied to 
problems commonly encountered in business and industry. P — PSY 151. (D) 

270. Topics in Psychology. (1.5h). Focused in-depth review of current theory and research on a 
selected topic in the field. P— PSY 151. 



PSYCHOLOGY 211 



280. Directed Study. (l-3h) Student research performed under faculty supervision. P — PSY 151 
and approval of faculty member prior to registration. 

282. Independent Research. (l-3h) Independent reading or research conducted under faculty 
supervision. P — PSY 151 and approval of faculty member prior to registration. Pass/Fail only. 

310. Methods in Psychological Research. (4h) Introduction to statistics and research design for 
students minoring in psychology. P — PSY 151 (D, QR) 

311,312. Research Methods in Psychology. (4h, 4h) Introduction to the design and statistical 
analysis of psychological research. Lab — twice weekly. P — PSY 151 (D, QR) 

313. History and Systems of Psychology. (3h) The development of psychological thought and 
research from ancient Greece to the present. P — Two PSY courses beyond 151 or POL (D) 

315. Vienna Psychologists. (3h) Examines the roots of psychological theory in Vienna in the late 
nineteenth and early tv\^entieth century. Focus is on how the thinking and practice of influential 
Viennese psychologists were affected by historical, political, and social contexts. Psychologists 
studied include Sigmund Freud, Adler, Fankl, Anna Freud, and Erikson. (D) 

320. Physiological Psychology. (3h) Neurophysiological and neuroanatomical explanations of 
behavior. P— PSY 310 or 311 or POL (D) 

322. Psychopharmacology. (3h) Survey of the influences of a wide range of psychoactive drugs, 
both legal and illegal, on human physiology, cognition, and behavior. P — PSY 151. (D) 

323. Animal Behavior. (3h) A survey of laboratory and field research on animal behavior. 
P— PSY 310 or 311 or POL (D) 

326. Learning Theory and Research. (3h) Theory and current research in learning, with emphasis 
on applications of learning principles for behavior modification and comparisons across spe- 
cies. P— PSY 310 or 312. C— PSY 312. (D) 

329. Perception. (3h) Survey of theory and research findings on various sensory systems (vision, 
hearing, touch, taste). P— PSY 310 or 312. (D) 

331. Cognition. (3h) Current theory and research in cognitive processes. Emphasis on memory, 
attention, visual and auditory information processing, concept identification /formation, and 
language. P— PSY 310 or 312. C— PSY 312. (D) 

333. Motivation of Behavior. (3h) Survey of basic motivational concepts and related evidence. 
P— PSY 310 or 312. C— PSY 312. (D) 

335. Fundamentals of Human Motivation. (3h) Description and analysis of some fundamental 
motivational phenomena, with special reference to human problems; includes reward and 
punishment, conflict anxiety, affection, needs for achievement and power, aggression, creativity, 
and curiosity. P— PSY 151. (D) 

338. Emotion. (3h) Survey of theory methods and research in the area of emotion. Developmen- 
tal, cultural, social-psychological, physiological, personality, and clinical perspectives on emo- 
tions are given. P— PSY 310 or 311. (D) 

341. Research in Developmental Psychology. (3h) Methodological issues and selected research in 
developmental psychology. Research projects required. P — PSY 310 or 312. C — PSY 312. (D) 



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PSYCHOLOGY 



344. Abnormal Psychology. (3h) Descriptive analysis of the major types of abnormal behavior 
with attention to organic, psychological, and cultural causes and major modes of therapy. 
Offered in the summer. P— PSY 151. (D) 

346. Psychological Disorders of Childhood. (3h) Survey of problems including conduct disorders, 
attention deficits disorders, depression, and autism. Emphasis on causes, prevention, treatment, 
and the relationships of disorders to normal child development and family life. P — PSY 245 or 
344 or POL (D) 

351. Personality Research. (3h) The application of a variety of research procedures to the study 
of human personality. Research projects required. P — PSY 310 or 311. (D) 

355. Research in Social Psychology. (3h) Methodological issues and selected research in the study 
of the human as a social animal. Research projects required. P — PSY 310 or 311. (D) 

357. Cross-Cultural Psychology. (3h) Examination of differences in psychological processes (e.g., 
attitudes, perception, mental health, organizational behavior) associated with cultural variation. 
P— PSY 151. (CD, D) 

359. Psychology of Gender. (3h) Exploration of the psychological similarities and differences 
between human males and females, including consideration of social, cognitive, motivational, 
biological, and developmental determinants of behavior. P — PSY 151. (CD, D) 

362. Psychological Testing, (3h) Overview of the development and nature of psychological tests 
with applications to school counseling, business, and clinical practice. Students have the op- 
portunity to take a variety of psychological tests. P — PSY 310 or 311. (D) 

363. Survey of Clinical Psychology. (3h) Overview of the field of clinical psychology. P — PSY 245 
and senior standing or POI. (D) 

364. Prejudice, Discrimination, Racism, and Heterosexism. (3h) Comparison of various socio- 
cultural/ ethnic /sexual groups' similarities and differences in the initiation, maintenance, and 
treatment of prejudice, discrimination, racism, and heterosexism, with an emphasis on past and 
current trends in the U.S. P— PSY 151 or POI. (CD, D) 

367. Effectiveness in Parent/Child Relations. (3h) Survey of popular approaches to child-rearing, 
with examination of the research literature on parent /child interaction and actual training in 
parental skills. P— PSY 151. (D) 

374. Judgment and Decision Making. (3h) Theoretical and empirical examination of how people 
make decisions and judgments about their lives and the world, and how these processes can be 
improved. P— PSY 310 or 311. (D) 

381 . Honors Seminar. (3h) Seminar on selected problems in psychology. Intended primarily for 
students in the departmental honors program. P — PSY 311 and POI. (D) 

383. Honors Research. (3h) Seminar in selected issues in research design, followed by indepen- 
dent empirical research under the supervision of a member of the departmental faculty. 
P— PSY 311 and POI. (D) 

392. Contemporary Issues in Psychology. (1.5h) Seminar treatment of current theory and research 
in several areas of psychology. Required for senior majors. P — PSY 311, P or C — PSY 312, and 
senior standing. 



PSYCHOLOGY 213 



Religion (REL) 

Chair Stephen B. Boyd 

Albritton Professor of the Bible Fred L. Horton Jr. 

Easley Professor of Religion Stephen B. Boyd 

Professors John E. Collins, Kenneth G. Hoglund, Charles A. Kimball 

Associate Professor Mary F. Foskett 

Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Fellow and Associate Professor James Ford 

Associate Professor Simeon llesanmi 

Assistant Professors Lynn Neal, Jarrod Whitaker 

* Adjunct Professor Bill J. Leonard 

Adjunct Associate Professor Mark Jensen 
Visiting Assistant Professors Megan Moore, Elaine Swartzentruber 

The study of religion is a way of organizing academic inquiry into how human beings and hu- 
man cultures express and experience their religious needs, beliefs, and values. It involves the 
study of both specific religious traditions and the general nature of religion as a phenomenon 
of human life. Using cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approaches, religious studies inves- 
tigate and interpret systems of religious belief, the history of religious traditions, the function 
of religion in society, and forms of religious expression such as ritual, symbols, sacred narra- 
tive, scripture, practices, theological and philosophical reflection. Students of religion, whether 
adherents of a religion or of no religion, gain tools to understand, compare, and engage the 
phenomenon of religion and its role in human life and culture. 

A major in religion requires a minimum of twenty-seven hours, of which twenty-one must be 
in courses above the 100-level. Students must take one course from each of three areas (Biblical 
Studies; Religion, History cind Society; World Religions) as designated by the course groupings 
below. In addition, students must take one of the following courses that focus on methodologi- 
cal approaches to the study of religion: 300, 304, 318, 330, 350, 351, 387. Majors interested in 
graduate studies are strongly encouraged to take REL 300 for this requirement. 

A minor in religion requires fifteen hours, nine of which must be above the 100-level and one 
course from the area of World Religions. The department provides advisers for students pursu- 
ing a minor. 

Honors. Highly qualified majors are encouraged to apply for admission to the honors program. 
Students who wish to pursue this ophon should refer to the honors guidelines, available by 
selecting the undergraduate tab at www.wfu.edu/religion, for an overview of requirements 
and procedures. Upon completion of all requirements, the candidate may graduate with 
"Honors in Religion." 

General Courses 

101 . Introduction to Religion. (3h) Study of meaning and value as expressed in religious thought, 
experience, and practice. Focus varies with instructor. (D) 

102. Introduction to the Bible. (3h) Study of the forms, settings, contents, and themes of the Old 
and New Testaments. Focus varies with instructor. (D) 



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RELIGION 



103. Introduction to the Christian Tradition. (3h) Study of Christian experience, thought, and 
practice. Focus varies with instructor. (D) 

104. Introduction to Asian Religions. (3h) Study of thought and practice within the major 
religious traditions of South and East Asia, generally including Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, 
Confucianism, and Taoism. Focus may vary with instructor. (CD, D) 

282. Honors in Religion. (3h) Conference course including directed reading and the writing of a 
research project. (Group I-III with department approval) 

286, 287. Directed Reading. (l-3h) A project in an area of study not otherwise available in the 
department. May be repeated for credit. (Group I-III with department approval) P — POL 

300. Approaches to the Study of Religion. (3h) Explores the history of and methodological re- 
sources for the study of religion. Focus may vary according to the instructor, but the emphasis is 
on the ways religion has been defined, studied, and interpreted over the last several centuries. 

304. Myth, Ritual, and Symbolism. (3h) Explores how people envision and manipulate the su- 
pernatural in cross-cultural perspective. Emphasizes functional aspects of religious beliefs and 
practices. Also listed as ANT 336. P— ANT 111 or 112 or 113 or 114, or POI. (CD) 

350. Psychology of Religion. (3h) Examination of the psychological elements in the origin, devel- 
opment, and expression of religious experience. 

351 . Sociology of Religion. (3h) Introduction to the sociological analysis of religion, including 
religious beliefs and experiences, the cultural context of religion, varieties of religious organiza- 
tion, religious change and social change. Also listed as SOC 301. 

390. Special Topics in Religion. (1.5h-3h) Religion topics of special interest. May be repeated for 
credit. Group I-III with department approval. P — POI. 

391-394. Reserved for Special Topics. Group I-III with department approval. 

396-399. Reserved for Inter-religious Dialogue. Group I-III with department approval. 

Group I — Biblical Studies 

261 . Foundations of Traditional Judaism. (1.5h) Study of rabbinic and medieval Judaism, empha- 
sizing the post-biblical codification of Jewish thought in the Mishnah, Talmud, and Midrash. 

285. Seminar in Early Christian Studies. (3h) Designed specially to meet the needs of students 
earning the interdisciplinary minor in early Christian studies, but is not limited to them. Ex- 
plores, from various points of view, the culture of the Mediterranean world from which Christi- 
anity was bom and grew: literature and art, history and economics, religions, and philosophies. 
May be repeated for credit. Also listed as CLA 285. 

308. Sacred Scripture in the Traditions of Abraham. (3h) Comparative study of sacred texts in 
Judaism, Christianity, and Islam with attention to the issues of authority, fiinction and 
interpretation. 

310. The Prophetic Literature. (3h) Examination of the development and theological contents of 
the literary products of Israel's prophetic movement. 

311. The Psalms. (1 .5h, 3h) Study of Hebrew poetry in English translation with special attention 
to its tjrpes, its literary and rhetorical characteristics, and its importance for our understanding 

RELIGION 215 



of the religion and culture of ancient Israel. (The first half of the course may be taken for 
1.5 hours and is a prerequisite for the second half.) 

3 1 2. The Critical Study of thie Pentateuch. (3h) Study of the five traditional books of Moses (the 
Torah) and the various lines of analysis that modem Biblical critics have used to interpret their 
composition and role in the development of Israelite theological thought. 

313. Near Eastern Archaeology. (3h) Survey of twentieth-century archaeology in the Near East 
with attention to its importance for Biblical studies. 

314. Ancient Israel and Her Neighbors. (1.5h) Study of ancient Near Eastern archeology with 
emphasis on Israel's relationships with surrounding peoples. 

315. 316. Field Research in Biblical Archaeology. (3h, 3h) Study of the religion and culture of the 
ancient Near East through the excavation and interpretation of an ancient site. 

317. Wisdom Literature. (3h) Examination of the development, literary characteristics, and theo- 
logical contents of the works of ancient Israel's sages. 

318. Feminist and Contemporary Interpretations of the New Testament. (3h) Study of feminist 
and contemporary approaches to the New Testament in light of the history of New Testament 
interpretation and a range of contemporary concerns and interpretive contexts. 

319.Visionsof the End: Jewish and Christian Apocalyptic. (3h) Reading and study of Daniel, Rev- 
elation, and certain non-Biblical apocalyptic texts. 

320. The Search for Jesus. (3h) Study of issues, assumptions, evidence, and debate that shapes 
the continuing quest for the historical Jesus. 

321. Introduction to the New Testament. (3h) Intensive introduction to the literature of the ca- 
nonical New Testament along with methodologies for its study. 

322. The General Epistles. (3h) Exegetical study of two or more of the general Epistles, with 
emphasis on the setting of the Epistles in the life of the early church. 

323. The Parables of Jesus. (3h) Examination of the historical, social, cultural, and theological 
significance of the parables of Jesus as recorded in the Synoptic Gospels. 

324. Early Christian Literature. (3h) Examination of various literatures and perspectives of the 
first three centuries of the Christian movement. 

326. Early Christian Theologians: Paul. (3h) Introduction to the Pauline interpretation of Christi- 
anity and its place in the life of the early church. 

327. The Story of Jesus. (3h) Reading, critical study, and interpretation of one of the canonical 
Gospels. 

Group II — Religion, History, and Society 

210. Jerusalem in History and Tradition. (3h) Examination of the ways meaning and religious 
significance have been imparted to Jerusalem far beyond its significance in world history. 

262. Contemporary Judaism. (1.5h) Survey of Judaism today, including influences of the Enlight- 
enment, Hasidism, Zionism, the Holocaust, and feminism. 



216 



RELIGION 



263. Contemporary Catholicism. (1.5h) Introduction to recent thought and practice in the Roman 
Catholic Church. 

266. Religious Sects and Cults. (3h) Examination of certain religious sects in America, including 
such groups as Jehovah's Witnesses, communal groups, and contemporary movements. 

277. Faith and Imagination. (3h) Study of modern writers, including C.S. Levs^is and J.R.R. 
Tolkien, who seek to retell the Christian story in imaginative terms. 

301 . Myth. (3h) Study of the approaches to the interpretation of myth, with a focus on the mean- 
ing and values implicit in the myths of contemporary culture. 

303. Religion and Science. (3h) Examination of the ways in which religion and science have con- 
flicted with, criticized, and complemented one another in the history of Western thought, with 
an emphasis on the issues raised by the contemporary dialogue. 

325. Theology and Contemporary Literature. (3h) Exploration of religious themes in a variety of 
contemporary literature such as Salinger, Walker and Silko with attention given to the intersec- 
tions and differences between theological and literary writing. 

330. Comparative Religious Ethics. (3h) Comparative study of the moral values and socio-ethical 
positions in the major religious traditions of the world, with particular focus on their various 
methods of reasoning and sources of authority. 

331 . Christian Ethics and Social Justice. (3h) kiquiry from a Christian perspective into different 
theoretical and practical responses to issues of justice in society. 

332. Religion and Public Life. (3h) Examination of alternative historical paradigms within specific 
religious traditions and the implications of those paradigms for the public activity of their ad- 
herents. Traditions and topics, including religious leadership, social entrepreneurship, and the 
separation of church and state, may vary with instructor. 

335. Religious Ethics and the Problem of War. (3h) Examination of the causes and characteristics 
of war, various religious responses to it, and approaches to peacemaking, with attention to 
selected contemporary issues. 

336. Religious Traditions and Human Rights. (3h) Study of relationships and tensions between 
religious traditions and human rights, with illustiations from historical and contemporary 
issues and movements. , 

338. Religion, Ethics, and Politics. (3h) Examination of ethical issues in religion and politics using 
materials from a variety of sources and historical periods. 

340. Men's Studies and Religion. (3h) Examination of the ways in which masculine sex-role 
expectations and male experiences have both shaped religious ideas, symbols, rituals, institu- 
tions, and forms of spirituality and have been shaped by them. Attention is given to the ways in 
which race, class, and sexual orientation affect those dynamics. 

341 . Civil Rights and Black Consciousness Movements. (3h) Social and religious history of the 
African- American struggle for citizenship rights and freedom from World War II to the present. 
Also listed as HST 376. (CD) 

345. The African-American Religious Experience. (3h) Exploration of the religious dimensions of 
African- American life from its African antecedents to contemporary figures and movements. 
(CD) 



RELIGION 



217 



346. Pentecostalism in Global Perspective. (3h) Examination of the history, theology, and prac- 
tices of Pentecostalism, the fastest growing Christian movement worldwide. Focus is on origins 
among poor whites and recently freed African Americans and the expansion in South America, 
Asia, and Africa. 

347. The Emerging Church in the Two-Thirds World. (3h) Investigation of contemporary Christian 
communities in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and Latin America with special attention to theo- 
logical, political, and economic activities. (CD) 

348. Reconciling Race. (3h) Comparative history of twentieth-century racial oppression, black 
rebellion, and religious reconciliation. Also listed as HST 378. (CD) 

354. Religious Development of the Individual. (3h) Study of growth and development from 
infancy through adulthood with emphasis on the role of the home and the church in religious 
education. 

365. History of Religions in America. (3h) Study of American religions from colonial times until 
the present. 

366. Gender and Religion. (3h) Examination of the historical and contemporary interaction 
between religion and sex roles, sexism, and sexuality. 

367. The Mystics of the Church. (3h) Historical study of the lives and thought of selected Chris- 
tian mystics with special attention to their religious experience. 

368. Protestant and Catholic Reformations. (3h) Study of the origin and development of Refor- 
mation theology and ecclesiology. 

369. Radical Christian Movements. (3h) Study of selected radical movements in the Christian 
tradition and their relation to contemporary issues. 

370. Women and Christianity. (3h) Study of the roles and contributions of women within Chris- 
tian traditions throughout history and analysis of the mechanisms of their oppression and 
liberation within those traditions. 

371. Theology and Sexual Embodiment. (3h) Survey of theological responses to human sexuality 
with emphasis on contemporary issues. 

372. History of Christian Thought. (3h) Study of recurring patterns in Christian thought across 
time and cultures and some of the implications of those patterns in representative ancient and 
modem Christian figures. 

373. Cinema and the Sacred. (3h) Investigation of select theological and religious themes in 
contemporary film. 

374. Contemporary Christian Thought. (3h) Examination of the major issues and personalities in 
modem theology. 

375. Theological Perspectives on Ecology. (3h) An examination of historical, theological and 
ethical perspectives on the relationship between humanity and nature. The focus will be on 
Christian sources with attention given to contemporary ecofeminists, ecopsychologists, and 
ecotheologians. 

376. Christian Literary Classics. (3h) Study of Christian texts which are masterpieces of literature 
as well as faith, including works by Augustine, Dante, Pascal, Bunyan, Milton, and Newman. 



218 



RELIGION 



377. The Problem of Evil from Job to Shakespeare. (3h) Comparative analysis of the source and 
remedy of evil in Job, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Plato, Dante, and Shakespeare. 

379. Feminist and Liberation Theologies. (3h) Exploration of social, pohtical, and religious con- 
texts that have given rise to contemporary theological understandings of salvation as freedom 
from conditions of oppression, poverty and exploitation. 

395. Seminar in Jewish-Christian Relations. (3h) Study of Jewish-Christian relations in historical, 
social, political, and religious context. Focus varies with instructor. 

Group III — World Religions 

265. Culture and Religion in Contemporary Native America. (3h) Interdisciplinary survey of 
American Indian culture, including the arts and literature, religions, and historical changes. 
Special emphasis is placed on the impact of the Conquista, encounters with Northern Atlantic 
societies, and contemporary developments. Also listed as HMN 285. (CD) 

273. World Religions in Dialogue. (3h) Team-taught course exploring issues and problems that 
arise from the interaction between religion, society, and culture worldwide. Choice of themes 
and religious traditions may vary in accordance with the instructors' areas of specialization and 
expertise. 

302. Mysticism. (3h) Study of mysticism from a multi-religious perspective with emphasis on the 
psychological and sociological aspects of the phenomenon. 

339. Religion, Society, and Power in Africa. (3h) Interdisciplinary study of the growth transforma- 
tions of Africa's major religious traditions (Christianity, Islam, and the indigenous religions) 
and of their relations with secular social changes. 

359. Hinduism in America. (3h) Study of the meanings, values, and practices associated with the 
religions of Hinduism in dialogue with the dominant culture of America. 

360. World Religions. (3h) Examination of the ideas and practices of major religious traditions in 
their historical and cultural contexts. Focus varies with instructor. (CD) 

361 . The Buddhist World of Thought and Practice. (3h) Survey of the development of Buddhism 
from India to Southeast Asia, China, Tibet, Japan, and the West, focusing on the tiansformation 
of Buddhist teachings and practices in these different social and cultural contexts. (CD) 

362. Islam. (3h) Examination of the origins and development of Islam. Attention is given to the 
formation of Islamic faith and practice, as well as contemporary manifestations of Islam in Asia, 
Africa, and North America. 

363. The Religions of Japan. (3h) Study of the central religious traditions of Japan from pre- 
history to the present, including Shinto, Buddhism, Zen Buddhism, Christianity, and 
Confucianism. (CD) 

364. Conceptions of the Afterlife. (3h) Examination of the variety of answers given to the ques- 
tion: "What happens after death?" Attention is given to the views of Jews, Christians, Muslims, 
Hindus, and Buddhists and the ways their views relate to life in this world. 

380. The Main Streams of Chinese Philosophy and Religion. (3h) Intioduction to the most im- 
portant traditions in Chinese philosophy and religion: Confucianism, Daosim (Taoism), and 
Chinese Buddhism or Chinese Chan (Zen) Buddhism. Also listed as PHI 350. 



RELIGION 



219 



381 . Zen Buddhism. (3h) Examination of the origins and development of Zen Buddhism from 
China (Ch'an) to Japan and contemporary America. Attention is given to Zen doctrine and 
practice in the context of the broader Buddhist tradition. 

382. Religion and Culture in China. (3h) Thematic study of Chinese religious culture focusing on 
history, ritual, scripture, and popular practice. Additional topics include cosmology, ancestor 
veneration, shamanism, divination, and the role of women. (CD) 

383. The Quran. (3h) Introduction to the history, content, and main approaches to the sacred 
book of Islam. Focus is on the early centuries of Islam and major developments in the twentieth 
and twenty-first centuries. 

384. Muhammad: Prophet and Paradigm. (3h) Exploration of the issues, assumptions, evidence, 
and debates that frame the various ways Muslims and non-Muslims understand the prophet of 
Islam. 

385. Hindu Religious Traditions. (3h) Examination of the principal themes of traditional Hindu- 
ism with concentration on historical and cultural developments of various traditions placed 
under the heading "Hinduism." 

386. Indian Epics in Performance. (3h) Examines the two Indian epics, the Mahabharata and 
Ramayana, while considering comparative issues of oral transmission, aesthetic theory, and 
epic performance. 

387. Magic, Ritual, & Power in Indian Culture. (3h) While paying special attention to academic 
theories of magic, this course considers magic in India, especially the Atharvaveda. 

Near Eastern Languages and Literature (NLL) 

Up to three hours from NLL courses 200 or above may be counted toward the major. No NLL 
course may count toward the minor. 

111,112. Elementary Hebrew. (3h, 3h) A course for beginners in the classical Hebrew of the Bible 
with emphasis on the basic principles of grammar and the reading of biblical texts. Both semes- 
ters must be completed. 

1 1IM. Elementary Arabic in an Immersion Setting. (6h) Five-week introduction to Modem Stan- 
dard Arabic. Taught during the summer in Fez, Morocco. 

1 1 3M. Colloquial Moroccan Arabic in an Immersion Setting. (3h) Five-week course presents the 
rudiments of the spoken dialect with emphasis on developing the necessary structures for ev- 
eryday interactions with native speakers. Can be taught with or without recourse to the Arabic 
script depending on student interest. Students wishing to register must complete an applica- 
tion early in the preceding spring semester in the Center for International Studies and must be 
admitted to the course. Taught during the summer in Fez, Morocco. 

153. Intermediate Hebrew. (3h) Intensive work in Hebrew grammar and syntax. Based upon the 
reading of selected texts. Readings emphasize post-biblical Hebrew. P — Hebrew 111, 112 or the 
equivalent. 

21 1 . Hebrew Literature. (3h) Reading and discussion of significant Biblical Hebrew texts. 
P— Hebrew 153. 



220 



RELIGION 



212. Hebrew Literature II. (3h) Reading and discussion of significant Biblical and post-Biblical 
texts. On request. P — Hebrew 153. 

301. Introduction to Semitic Languages. (3h) Con^parative study of the history and structure of 
the languages of the Semitic family. On request. 

302. Akkadian I. (3h) Analysis of the phonology, morphology, and syntax of the East Semitic 
languages of the ancient Near East as they relate to the larger family of Semitic languages. On 
request. 

303. Akkadian II. (3h) Continuation of Akkadian I (NLL 302) with emphasis on building exper- 
tise in vocabulary and syntax through the reading of texts from the Middle Babylonian period. 
On request. 

310. Intermediate Readings in Classical Hebrew. (Ih) Analysis of selected texts designed to ex- 
pand the student's facility with Hebrew. May be repeated for credit. 

311. Aramaic. (3h) The principles of Aramaic morphology, grammar, and syntax based on read- 
ings from the Bible and other ancient Near Eastern texts. On request. P — NLL 112 or POL 

314. Readings from the Rabbis. (3h) Texts in Hebrew and Aramaic from the Talmud and 
Midrash. On request. P— NLL 311 or POL 

315. Syriac. (3h) Study of the grammar, syntax, and scripts of Syriac based on the reading of 
selected texts. On request. P — NLL 311 or POL 

321, 322. Introduction to Middle Egyptian I and II. (3h, 3h) The phonology, morphology, and 
grammar of Middle Egyptian. On request. 

325. Coptic. (3h) The phonology, morphology, and grammar of Sahidic Coptic with special em- 
phasis on the texts from Nag Hammadi. Some knowledge of Greek is helpful. On request. 

Sanskrit Languages and Literature (SKT) 

No SKT course may count toward the major or minor in religion. 

111-112. Introduction to Sanskrit. (3h, 3h) Two-semester sequence designed to introduce stu- 
dents to classical Sanskrit with emphasis on the basic principles of grammar, sjmtax, historical 
linguistics, and the reading of classical Indian texts. On request. 



RELIGION 221 



Romance Languages 

Chair Byron Wells 

Charles E. Taylor Professor of Romance Languages Candelas S. Gala 

Professors Antonio C. Vitti, Byron R.Wells, M. Stanley Whitley 

Associate Professors Jane W. Albrecht, Sarah E. Barbour, Mary L Friedman, Ola Furmanek, 

Luis Gonzalez, Linda S. Howe, Judy K. Kem, Soledad Miguel-Prendes, Roberta Morosini, 

Stephen Murphy, Mari'a Teresa Sanhueza, Kendall Tarte 
Assistant Professors Irma Alarcon, Margaret Ewalt, J. Michael Fulton, Anne E. Hardcastle, 

Kathryn Mayers, Stephanie Pellet 
Visiting Assistant Professors Elisabeth Barron, Corrado Corradini, Vera Castro, Ana Leon-Tavora, 

Patricia Swier, Alicia Vitti, Itza Zavala-Garrett, 

Lecturers Elizabeth Mazza Anthony, Elisabeth d'Empaire Wilbert 

Instructors Jorge Aviles-Diz, Karina Bautista, Justin Bennett, Celia Garzon-Arrabal, Renee Gutierrez, 

Rebekah Morris, Veronique M. McNelly, Claudia Ospina, Jenny Puckett, Encarna Turner 

The department offers programs leading to majors in French and Spanish, minors in French, 
Italian, and Spanish, and certificates in Spanish and French for business, and in Spanish transla- 
tion and Spanish interpreting. The requirements for completion of each degree program are 
those in effect in the bulletin year when the declaration of the major, minor, and certificate 
occurs. 

The major in French Studies requires a minimum of twenty-seven hours of French courses num- 
bered above 212 or 213. FRH 216, 315, 319, 370, one of the genre courses (363, 364, or 365), and 
four other courses are required. Students are advised and encouraged to take related courses 
in other areas of the University curriculum, such as HST 217, 218, and 317, and HMN 222. 
Students must achieve at least a C grade in each course in the major. In order to count for the 
major, 319 must be taken at Wake Forest. Credit towards the major cannot be received for both 
320 and 3202. 

The minor in French Studies requires a minimum of eighteen hours of French courses numbered 
above 212 or 213. FRH 216, 315, 319 and three other courses are required. With departmental 
approval, equivalent courses may be selected from the Dijon program, and certain other substi- 
tutions may be made. In order to count for the minor, 319 must be taken at Wake Forest. Credit 
towards the minor cannot be received for both 320 and 3202. 

The major in Spanish requires a minimum of twenty-seven hours of Spanish courses numbered 
above 213. SPN 317 or SPA 217, SPN 318 or SPA 218, SPN 319 or 319L or SPA 219 or 219L or 
SPA 2199, plus three advanced courses in literature, of which one must be in Spanish literature 
and one in Spanish-American literature, and three electives are required. Students must achieve 
at least a C grade in each course in the major. In order to count for the major, SPN 319 or SPA 
219 must be taken at Wake Forest or in Salamanca. 

The minor in Spanish requires a minimum of eighteen hours in Spanish courses numbered 
above 213. SPN 317 or SPA 217, SPN 318 or SPA 218, SPN 319 or 319L or SPA 219 or 219L or 
SPA 2199 and one advanced course in literature are required. With departmental approval, 
equivalent courses may be selected from the programs in Salamanca, Queretaro, or Havana, 
and certain other substitutions may be made. 



222 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



The minor in Italian language and culture requires fifteen hours in Italian above ITA 153. It 
includes ITA 213, 216, 319, 320, and 324 or their equivalents. Students must achieve at least a C 
grade in each course in the minor. 

Certificate in Spanish for Business requires SPN 319 or SPN 319L or SPA 219 or SPA 219L; SPN 
387 or SPA 329; SPN 388 or SPA 330, 381, and one additional course above 213 in any area of 
Hispanic literature or culture. SPN 389 or SPA 385; or SPA 3859 are strongly recommended. SPN 
3871 or SPA 3289 may be substituted for either SPN 387 or SPA 329; or SPN 388 or SPA 330. 

Certificate in Spanish for Medical Professions requires fifteen hours above 213. It includes SPN 
319 or 319L; or SPA 219 or 219L; SPN 316 or SPA 220, SPN 385 or SPA 327, 382, and one addi- 
tional course above 213. 

Certificate in Spanish Translation/Localization (STL) teaches strategies of Spanish into English 
translation and introduces students to various software language applications; includes an 
internship in a professional translation environment (384). Hours: 13-15. Requirements include 
SPN 324 or SPA 380 and 381; LIN 383; and either SPN 387 or SPA 329 or 382. 

Certificate in Spanish Interpreting (SI) teaches strategies for different types of Spanish /English 
interpreting; includes an internship (384). Hours: 10-12. Requirements include one literature 
course above 213, 382, 384, and any one of the follovi^ing: SPN 387 or SPA 329; or SPN 324 or 
SPA 380 or 381; or LIN 383. 

Certificate in French for Business requires FRH 319, 321, 329, 330, and one additional course in 
French above 212 or 213. 

All majors, minors, and certificate students are strongly urged to take advantage of the depart- 
ment's study abroad programs. 

Transfer credit for courses approved as 500 will count toward the major or minor. Courses 
approved as SPN 500S will fulfill an advanced Peninsular literature requirement for the major 
or minor. Courses approved as SPN 500A will fulfill an advanced Latin- American literature 
requirement for the major or minor. Courses approved as SPN 500E will count as an elective for 
the major or minor. Transfer credit approved as 520 will not count toward the major or minor. 

Honors. The honors designation in Romance Languages is a recognition of outstanding scholar- 
ship in the field, as evidenced by academic achievement, critical thinking, and intellectual 
initiative. Highly qualified majors selected by the Romance Languages faculty are invited to 
participate in the honors program, which candidates undertake in addition to the requirements 
for the major. 

The honors program requires completion of SPN 398 or SPA 390 or FRH 390 (Directed Read- 
ing, 1.5h) and SPN 399 or SPA 391 or FRH 391 (Directed Research, 3h). Directed Reading, nor- 
mally taken during a student's last semester, includes reading and discussion of a number of 
texts on the selected topic, and a written exam covering these texts. At the end of fall semester, 
the student submits an annotated bibliography and an abstract of the honors thesis. Directed 
Research, taken during the student's final semester, consists of writing the thesis following a 
schedule established by the director and the student. At the end of this course, the honors stu- 
dent defends the thesis orally before appropriate faculty who collectively may confer honors. 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



223 



Intensive Summer Language Institute (ISLI) 

Purpose: ISLI is a language immersion program. It offers a curriculum that enables students to 
achieve the necessary proficiencies in the Spanish language at the beginning-intermediate level 
and be better prepared to perform in subsequent courses in which they may enroll. 

Intensive Summer Language Institute (ISLI) on the Wake Forest Campus: ISLI on campus offers 
SPN 153S. Intensive Begirming and Intermediate Spanish in an Immersion Setting. (8h). This is 
an accelerated five-vv^eek course in an immersion setting that is offered in the first summer term. 
Class size is reduced for individualized instruction. Requirements include daily classes, six 
hours per day; one-hour daily lunches v^ith instructors in the target language; two-hour extra 
curricular activities two evenings per week; two Saturday mornings; housing in the language 
designated residence hall (optional); and a pledge to speak the target language. 

Intensive Summer Language Institute (ISLI) in Italy: (8h) Wake Forest conducts a six-week immer- 
sion program in elementary or intermediate Italian during a special summer term, five weeks in 
Casa Artom in Venice and one week in another Italian location. Students enroll in either 
ITA nSV or 153V. 

Information on courses offered as part of the Intensive Summer Language Institute is included 
in the course listings. 

French (FRH) 

111,112. Elementary French. (3h, 3h) Two-semester sequence designed to help students under- 
stand and speak French and also learn to read and write French at the elementary level. Labs 
required. 

113. Intensive Elementary French. (4h) Review of the material from 111-112 in one semester, in- 
tended for students whose preparation for 153 is inadequate. Credit not given for both 113 and 
111 or 112. Labs required. By placement or faculty recommendation. 

1 13F. Intensive Elementary French in an Immersion Setting. (8h) Six-week intensive course de- 
signed for students with a maximum of one semester of previous study in French, taught dur- 
ing the summer in France or a francophone country. Students wishing to register must complete 
an application early in the preceding spring semester in the Department of Romance Languages 
and must be admitted to the course. Credit is not given for both FRH 113F and 112. 

153. Intermediate French. (4h) Intermediate-level course covering the structure of the language, 
developing students' reading, writing, and conversation skills and preparing them for oral and 
written discussion of readings in FRH 212 and 213. Note that 153 and other 153 marked courses 
(153F, 154) are mutually exclusive. Labs required. P — FRH 111-112, or 113, or placement. 

1 53F. Intermediate French in an Immersion Setting. (6h) Five-week course taught during the 
summer in France or a francophone country. Covers the language and cultures of the franco- 
phone world. No student may receive credit for both 153 and 153F. Students wishing to register 
must complete an application for the summer study-abroad program to be admitted. 
P— FRH 112, 113 or POL 

1 54. Accelerated Intermediate French. (3h) Intensive, intermediate-level course intended for 
students with a stronger background than required of 153 students. Offers the opportunity to 
develop reading, writing, and conversation skills and prepare for oral and written discussion of 
readings in FRH 212 and 213. Labs required. P — POI or placement. 



224 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



196. French Across the Curriculum. (1.5h) Coursework in French done as an adjunct to specially- 
designated courses throughout the college curriculum. May be taken for grade or Pass/Fail. 
P— POL 

197. French for Reading Knowledge. (1.5) Review of essential French grammar usage, vocabulary 
and processing strategies for reading types of literary, social science, and technical publications 
for content. Designed for students interested mainly in strengthening reading proficiency in the 
language, and aimed at preparing students to take the graduate reading exam administered at 
the end of the course. Offered only in the first half of the semester. Pass/Fail only. P — Intermediate 
French, or its equivalent, and placement exam. Undergraduate credit given. 

198. Internship in French Language. (1.5h or 3h) Under faculty direction, a student undertakes 
a language project in conjunction with an off-campus service commitment or internship. In- 
cludes, but is not limited to, vocabulary building, keeping a journal, and reading professional 
material. Pass/Fail only. P— FRH 319 or POI. 

212. Exploring the French and Francophone World. (3h) Exploration of significant cultural 
expressions from the French and francophone world. Emphasis both on the development of 
competence in speaking, reading and writing French and on understanding how particular 
French-speaking societies have defined themselves. Students cannot receive credit for 212, 213, 
and 213H. P— FRH 153 or equivalent. 

213. Encounters: French and Francophone Literature and Culture. (3h) Encounters with significant 
literary expressions from the French-speaking world. Emphasis on the advancement of compe- 
tence in speaking, reading and writing and on the analysis of literature in its cultural contexts. 
Highly recommended for prospective majors and minors. Students cannot receive credit for 
212, 213, and 213H. P— 153 or equivalent. 

21 3H. Encounters: French and Francophone Literature and Culture (Honors). (3h) In the honors 
section of the course, texts covered are much the same as those presented in other FRH 213 sec- 
tions, but coursework focuses more intensely on developing effective reading strategies and on 
improving written and oral expression in the language. Intended for students with a stronger 
background in French (shown, for example, by a 3, 4, or 5 on the AP French Language Exam, 
by a high Wake Forest placement exam score, or by completion of FRH 154). Students cannot 
receive credit for 212, 213, and 213H. P— FRH 153 and POI. 

216. Studies in French and Francophone Literature and Culture. (3h) Study of the ways in which 
various aspects of French and francophone cultures appear in different literary genres over 
certain periods of time. Emphasis is on reading and discussion of selected representative texts. 
May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Required for major. P — FRH 212 or 213 or POI. (CD) 

21 7F. Conversation, Culture, and Literature. (8h) Six-week course taught in the summer in France 
or a francophone country. Includes both language study and literary texts. Students wishing to 
register must complete an application early in the preceding spring semester in the Department 
of Romance Languages and must be admitted to the course. P — FRH 212, 213 or equivalent. 

315. Introduction to French and Francophone Studies. (3h) Orientation in French and franco- 
phone cultures through their historical development and their various forms. Includes the 
study of literary, historical, and social texts, and possibly films, art, and music. Required for 
major. (A student taking 3152 as part of the Dijon program would receive credit for this course. 
Please see the description of the Dijon program for details.) (CD) 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



225 



319. Composition and Review of Grammar. (4h) Systematic review of the fundamental principles 
of comparative grammar, with practical training in writing idiomatic French. Required for 
major. P — FRH 200-level course or equivalent. 

320. French Conversation. (3h) A language course based on cultural materials. Designed to 
perfect aural skills and oral proficiency by systematically increasing vocabulary and reinforcing 
command of specific grammatical points. Short written works are assigned. Includes a regularly 
scheduled language lab one hour per week. P — FRH 200-level course or equivalent. 

321. Introduction to Translation. (3h) Introduction to translation strategies through theory and 
practice. Emphasis is on translation of a broad variety of texts, including different literary and 
journalistic modes. Attention is given to accuracy in vocabulary, structures, forms, and to cul- 
tural concerns. P— FRH 319 or POI. 

322. French Phonetics. (3h) Study of the principles of standard French pronunciation, with 
emphasis on their practical application as well as on their theoretical basis. P — 200-level course 
or equivalent. 

323. Advanced Grammar and Stylistics. (3h) Review and application of grammatical structures 
for the refinement of writing techniques. Emphasis is on the use of French in a variety of 
discourse types. Attention is given to accuracy and fluency of usage in the written language. 
P— FRH 319 or equivalent or POI. 

329. Introduction to Business French. (3h) Introduction to the use of French in business. Empha- 
sizes oral and written practices, reading, and French business culture, as well as a comprehen- 
sive analysis of different business topics and areas. P — FRH 319 or POI. 

330. Advanced Business French. (3h) Development of advanced skills in French for business. 
Emphasis is on oral and written business presentations, reading comprehension of case studies 
related to the French business world, and cross-cultural awareness. P — FRH 329 or POI. 

360. Cinema and Society. (3h) Study of French and francophone cultures through cinema. 
Readings and films may include film as artifact, film theory, and film history. P — FRH 216, 315 
or POI. (CD) 

363. Trends in French and Francophone Poetry. (3h) Study of the development of the poetic genre 
with analysis and interpretation of works from each period. P — FRH 216, 315 or POI. 

364. French and Francophone Prose Fiction. (3h) Broad survey of prose fiction in French, with 
critical study of representative works from a variety of periods. P — FRH 216, 315 or POI. 

365. French and Francophone Drama. (3h) Study of the chief trends in dramatic art in French, 
with reading and discussion of representative plays from selected periods: Baroque, Classicism, 
and Romanticism, among others. P — FRH 216, 315 or POI. 

370. Seminar in French and Francophone Studies. (3h) In-depth study of particular aspects of 
selected literary and cultural works from different genres and /or periods. Topics vary from 
semester to semester. Required for major. Can be repeated for credit. P — FRH 216, 315 or POI. 
(CD) 

375. Special Topics. (1.5h or 3h) Selected themes and approaches to French and francophone lit- 
erature transcending boundaries of time and genre. Topics to be chosen by staff in consultation 
with majors prior to the term the course is offered. May be repeated once for credit. P — FRH 
216, 315 or POI. 



226 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



381. French Independent Study. (1.5h-3h) P— POD. 

390. Directed Reading. (1.5h) Required for departmental honors in French studies. 

391. Directed Research. (3h) Extensive reading and/or research to meet individual needs. 
Required for departmental honors in French studies. P — POD. 

Semester in France 

The department sponsors a semester in Dijon, France, the site of a well-established French 
university. Students go as a group in the fall semester, accompanied by a departmental faculty 
member. Majors in all disciplines are eligible. Juniors are given preference, but v^ell-qualified 
sophomores are also considered. Applicants should have completed the basic foreign language 
requirement (FRH 212, 213 or equivalent), or should do so before going to Dijon. They are 
encouraged — but not required — to take one course or more above the level, preferably FRH 319 
(Composition and Review of Grammar). 

Students are placed in language courses according to their level of ability in French, as 
ascertained by a test given at Dijon. Courses are taught by native French professors. The 
resident director supervises academic, residential, and extracurricular affairs and has general 
oversight of independent study projects. 

3152. Studies in French Language and Culture. (6h) Familiarization with the language and 
culture of France and its people. Courses in conversational and idiomatic French, practice in 
writing, participation in French family life, lectures on selected topics, and excursions to points 
of historical and cultural significance. Satisfies FRH 315 requirement for major or minor. 

3202. Advanced Oral and Written French. (3h) Study of grammar, composition, pronunciation, 
and phonetics, with extensive practice in oral and written French. 

3242. Contemporary France. (3h) Study of present-day France, including aspects of geography 
and consideration of social, political, and educational factors in French life today 

3402. Independent Study. (1.5h-3h) One of several fields; scholar's journal and research paper. 
Supervision by the director of the semester in France. Work may be supplemented by lectures 
on the subject given at the Universite de Bourgogne Faculte des Lettres et Sciences Humaines. 

3742. Special Topics in French Literature. (1.5h) Selected topics in French literature; topics vary 
from year to year. 

ART 271 2. Studies in French Art. (3h) Lectures and field tiips in French painting, sculpture, and 
architecture, concentiating on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Counts for the major in 
French studies. 

Italian (ITA) 

111,112. Elementary Italian. (3h, 3h) A course for beginners, covering grammar essentials and 
emphasizing speaking, writing, and the reading of elementary texts. Lab required. These two 
courses count for students in the Venice program. 

113. Intensive Elementary Italian. (4h) Intensive course for beginners, emphasizing the structure 
of the language and oral practice. Recommended for students in the Venice program and for 
language minors. Credit not given for both ITA 113 and ITA 111 or 112. Lab required. Lecture. 
By placement or faculty recommendation. Offered every semester. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 227 



1 13V. Intensive Elementary Italian in an Immersion Setting. (8h) Six-week intensive course in Ital- 
ian taught during the summer in Venice, Italy, designed for students with a maximum of one 
semester of previous study in Italian. Covers language and culture. Students wishing to register 
must complete an application early in the spring semester in the Department of Romance Lan- 
guages and be admitted to the course. Credit not given for both ITA 113V and ITA 112. Offered 
only in the summer. 

153. Intermediate Italian. (4h) Continuation of 113 with emphasis on speaking, developing 
students' reading, writing skills and preparing them for oral and written discussion of literary 
texts in ITA 215. Lab required. P— ITA 113. 

154. Intermediate Italian. (3h) Intermediate-level course intended for students who have taken 
the 111-112 sequence. Offers the opportunity to develop further their reading, writing and 
conversation skills and prepare for oral and written discussion of literary texts in ITA 215. Lab 
required. P— ITA 111-112. 

196. Italian Across the Curriculum. (1.5h) Coursework in Italian done as an adjunct to specially- 
designated courses throughout the college curriculum. May be taken for grade or Pass/Fail. 
P— POL 

197. Italian for Reading Knowledge. (1.5h) Review of essential Italian grammar, usage, vocabu- 
lary, and processing strategies for reading various types of literary, social science, and technical 
publications for content. Designed for students interested in strengthening reading proficiency 
in the language and aimed at preparing students to take the graduate reading exam adminis- 
tered at the end of the course. Undergraduate credit given. Offered in the first half of the semester. 
P — Intermediate Italian or equivalent and placement exam. 

212. The Languages and Cultures of Italy and Italian in the World. Continued language study 
through exploration of significant cultural expression from the multifaceted Italian world. 
Students cannot receive credit for both 212 and 213. 

213. Introduction to Italian Literature. (3h) Reading of selected texts in Italian. Satisfies basic 
requirement in foreign language. P — ITA 153 or equivalent. 

216. Literary and Cultural Studies of Italy. (3h) Study of selected texts, cultural trends, and intel- 
lectual movements. Intended for students interested in continuing Italian beyond the basic 
requirements. P— ITA 212, 213 or POL 

319. Grammar and Composition. (3h) Review of the basics of structure and vocabulary; detailed 
examination of syntax and idiomatic expressions; practice in translation of texts of diverse 
styles and from varied sources; and free composition. P — ITA 212, 213 or 216 or equivalent. 

320. Advanced Conversation and Composition. (3h) Practice in speaking and writing Italian, 
stressing correctness of sentence structure, and emphasis on phonetics, pronunciation, fluency, 
and vocabulary for everyday situations. P — ITA 212, 213 or 216. 

324. Italian Regional Cultures. (3h) The course focuses on different aspects of regional cultures in 
Italy. Emphasis is placed on local lifestyles, literatures, and cinematography. Regional cultures 
and historic background are analyzed and compared through class demonstrations and cultural 
artifacts. P— ITA 216 or POL 

325. Italian Neorealism in Films and Novels. (3h) Designed to provide an understanding of the 
history, philosophy, politics, artistic movements and civic renaissance of postwar Italian life. By 



228 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



discussing the most important films, novels, short stories, essays, poetry and discussions of the 
time, students discover and learn about Neorealism. P — ITA 216 or POI. 

326. Comedy in Italian Cinema. (3h) Study of modern Italian society through the analysis of films 
from the 1950s to the present. Taught in Italian. P— ITA 216 or POI. 

327. Modern Italian Cinema. (3h) Study of the major developments of modern Italian cinema. 
Full-length feature films by Federico Fellini, Ettore Scola, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Bernardo Berto- 
lucci, Marco Bellocchio, Gianni Amelio, Nanni Moretti, Gabriele Moretti Salvatores, Guiseppe 
Tomatore, Massimo Troisi, Roberto Benigni, and other Italian filmmakers are studied and 
discussed from different perspectives. P — ITA 216 or POI. 

328. Dante's Divine Comedy. (3h) Introduction to Italian medieval literature and culture through 
a selected, critical reading of Dante's masterpiece and other medieval texts. Introduces students 
to the intellectual and social context of the Italian Middle Ages by relating the texts to the cul- 
tural, political, social, and philosophical concerns of the period. P — ITA 216 or POI. 

329. introduction to Renaissance Literature and Culture. (3h) Examination of the culture of the 
Italian Renaissance. Topics include the ideal of the artist, the ideal of the courtier, the epic genre, 
the political debates in Florence, the figure of the artist /scientist Leonardo da Vinci, the figure 
of the navigator, and daily life in Italian cities studied from different social classes and perspec- 
tives. P— ITA 216 or POI. 

330. Cinematic Adaptation and Literary Inspiration. (3h) Students examine cinematic adaptations 
of literary works by reading closely the literary texts and viev^ing their visual counterparts. 
Students investigate the strategies of adaptation, as w^ell as the criteria by which films based on 
novels can be evaluated as works of art in their own right. P — ITA 216 or POI. 

331 . Boccaccio and the Italian Novella. (3h) An examination of the birth and development of the 
Italian Novella tradition from the Novellino to Luigi Da Porto's La Giulietta. P — ITA 216 or POI. 

332. Italian Theatre in the Renaissance. (3h) Study of selected Italian Renaissance plays and the 
theatrical space. P— ITA 216 or POI. 

333. Modern Italian Theatre. (3h) Study of Representative Modem Italian Plays from Goldoni to 
Dario Fo. P— ITA 216 or POI. 

334. Italian Communism as a Subculture. (3h) Loved, feared and reviled: the Italian communist 
experience in cinema, literature and theatre. P — ITA 216 or POI. 

335. Italian Women Writers. (3h) A study of representative novels by women writers from Italy 
and the Italian world, with special emphasis on the historical novel within its cultural context. 
P— ITA 216 or POI. 

336. Italian Women and the City. (3h) This course proposes through Italian readings and films 
the Lnterpenetration of women's lives with the urban environment, both physical and imagined. 
It proposes to be a guide to mapping not only how city spaces shape or limit women's lives but 
also how women participate in the construction or reconstruction of these spaces. P — ITA 216 
or POI. 

337. Pier Paolo Pasolini and Utopia. (3h) A study of the life and works of poet, writer, playwright, 
filrmnaker, lecturer, and essayist within the social, cultural, literary and artistic realities of con- 
temporary Italy. Special emphasis is placed on Pasolini's films. P — ITA 216 or POI. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 229 



375. Special Topics. (3h) Selected special topics in Italian literature. P — ITA 216 or POI. 
381. Italian Independent Study. {1.5-3h) P— POD. 

Semester in Venice 

1533. Intermediate Italian. (4h) Intensive exposure to speaking, listening, reading and writing 
at the intermediate level with special emphasis on the surrounding Venetian culture. Counts as 
equivalent to Italian 153. Only taught in Venice. P — ITA 113 or 111-112 sequence. 

2173. Studies of Italy. (3h) Survey course on Italian literature from authors from the various re- 
gions of Italy and on special cultural themes such as Italian immigration and new immigrations 
in Italy to give to students in Venice a deeper and broader understanding of Italian cultural 
complexity. Only taught in Venice. P — ITA 215 or 216 or POI. 

See the course listings under Italian for descriptions and prerequisites. i 

Portuguese (PTG) 

113. Intensive Elementary Portuguese. (4h) Intensive introduction to Portuguese designed to 
help students develop the ability to understand and speak Portuguese and also learn to read 
and write Portuguese at the elementary level. 

Spanish (SPN) 

111-112. Elementary Spanish. (3h, 3h) Two-semester sequence designed to help students de- 
velop the ability to understand and speak Spanish and also learn to read and write Spanish at 
the elementary level. Labs required. 

1 1 3. Intensive Elementary Spanish. (4h) Review of the material from 111-112 in one semester, 
intended for students whose preparation for 153 is inadequate. Credit not given for both 113 
and 111 or 112. Labs required. By placement or faculty recommendation. 

153. Intermediate Spanish. (4h) Intermediate-level course covering the structure of the language, 
developing students' reading, writing, and conversation skills and preparing them for oral and 
written discussion of readings. Note that 153 and 154 are mutually exclusive. Labs required. 
P— SPN 111-112, or 113; SPA 111-112, or 113; or placement. 

1 53S. Intensive Beginning and Intermediate Spanish in an Immersion Setting. (8h) Designed to 
enable students to achieve proficiency in Spanish language at the beginning-intermediate level 
by developing reading, writing, and conversation skills and preparing students for oral and 
written discussion of readings. Offered only in the summer. (ISLI) P — SPN 111 (SPN 112 strongly 
recommended); or SPA 111 (SPA 112 strongly recommended) or POI. 

154. Accelerated Intermediate Spanish. (3h) Intensive, intermediate-level course intended for 
students with a stronger background than 153 students. Offers the opportunity to develop 
further reading, writing, and conversation skills and prepare for oral and written discussion of 
readings. Labs required. P — POI or placement. 

196. Spanish Across the Curriculum. (1.5h) Coursework in Spanish done as an adjunct to special- 
ly-designated courses throughout the college curriculum. May be taken for grade or Pass/Fail. 
P— POI. 



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196B. Spanish Across the Business/Economics Curriculum. (1.5h) Coursework in Spanish done as 
an adjunct to specifically-designated courses in business and economics curriculum. P — POL 

196C. Spanish Across the Sciences Curriculum. (1.5h) Coursework in Spanish done as an adjunct 
to specifically-designated courses in the sciences and medical curriculum. P — POL 

197. Spanish for Reading Knowledge. (1.5h) Review of essential Spanish grammar, usage, vocab- 
ulary and processing strategies for reading various types of literary, social science and technical 
publications for content. Designed for students interested in strengthening reading proficiency 
in the language and aimed at preparing students to take the graduate reading exam adminis- 
tered at the end of the course. Undergraduate credit given. Offered in the first half of the semester. 
Pass/Fail only. P — Intermediate Spanish or its equivalent, and placement exam. 

198. Service Learning in Spanish Language. (1.5h) Experiential learning that links classroom 
instruction and community service done as an adjunct to specially-designated courses through- 
out the Spanish curriculum. Pass /Fail only. P — POL 

Note: Students may receive credit for only one 200-level course in Spanish. 

212. Exploring the Hispanic World. (3h) Exploration of significant cultural expressions from the 
Spanish-speaking world. Emphasis both on the development of competence in speaking, read- 
ing and writing Spanish and on understanding how particular Hispanic societies have defined 
themselves. P— SPN 153 or SPA 153; or equivalent. 

213. Encounters: Hispanic Literature and Culture. (3h) Encounters with significant literary ex- 
pressions from the Spanish-speaking world. Emphasis on the advancement of competence in 
speaking, reading and writing and on the analysis of literature in its cultural contexts. Highly 
recommended for prospective majors and minors. P — SPN 153 or SPA 153; or equivalent. 

21 3H. Encounters: Hispanic Literature and Culture (Honors). (3h) In the honors sections of En- 
counters: Hispanic Literature and Culture, texts covered are much the same as those presented 
in other 213 sections, but coursework focuses more intensely on developing effective reading 
strategies and on improving written and oral expression in the language. Intended for students 
with a stronger background in Spanish (shown, for example, by a 3, 4, or 5 on the AP Spanish 
Language Exam, a high Wake Forest placement exam score, or by completion of 154). P — SPN 
153 or SPA 153 and POL 

316. Spanish Conversation. (3h) Based on cultural material intended to increase students' aural 
skills and oral proficiency by systematically increasing vocabulary and reinforcing command 
of specific grammatical points. Counts toward the major. Not open to students who have taken 
college courses in a Spanish-speaking country. Same as SPA 220. P — 200-Ievel course or 
equivalent. 

317. Literary and Cultural Studies of Spain. (3h) A study of the cultural pluralism of Spain 
through selected literary and artistic works to promote understanding of Spain's historical 
development. Same as SPA 217. P— 200-level course or POL (CD) 

318. Literary and Cultural Studies of Spanish America. (3h) Study of selected major works of 
Spanish- American literature within their historical and cultural contexts. Emphasis is on these 
contexts, including political structures, intellectual currents, art, music, and film, to promote 
understanding of Spanish America's historical development. Same as SPA 218. P — 200-level 
course or POL (CD) 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 231 



319. Grammar and Composition. (4h) A systematic study of Spanish morphology, sentence 
structure, and expository usage applied to various kinds of composition: description, narration, 
argumentation, etc. Same as SPA 219. P — 200-level course or equivalent. 

31 9L. Grammar and Composition for Heritage Speakers of Spanish. (4h) For heritage speakers 
Vk^ho are competent in spoken Spanish. Systematic study of Spanish word formation, sen- 
tence structure, and expository usage applied to various kinds of composition. Emphasis on 
vocabulary enhancement, exposure to formal registers and other varieties of Spanish, as well 
as intensive writing practice and improvement of students' reading skills. Same as SPA 219L. 
P — 200-level course or equivalent and POL 

Linguistics and Language Courses 

321 . The Rise of Spanish. (3h) The development of Spanish from an early Romance dialect to a 
world language. Study of ongoing changes in the language's sounds, grammar, and vocabulary 
system, with a special focus on the effects of a cultural history and relationships with other 
languages. P— SPN 319 or SPN 319L and SPN 316; or SPA 219 or SPA 219L and SPA 220; or POL 

322. Spanish Pronunciation and Dialect Variation. (3h) Description of, and practice with, the 
sounds, rhythm, and intonation of Spanish and the differences from English, with special 
attention to social and regional diversity. Strongly recommended for improving pronunciation. 
Meets an N.C. requirement for teacher certification. P — SPN 316 or SPA 220; or POL 

323. Advanced Grammar and Composition. (3h) Advanced-level review of Spanish morphology 
and syntax applied to the refinement of writing techniques. Same as SPA 319. P — SPN 319 or 
SPN 319L; or SPA 219 or SPA 219L; or POL 

324. Contrastive Spanish/English Grammar and Stylistics. (3h) Advanced study of structure and 
style in a variety of Spanish texts, with an in-depth approach to idiomatic expressions and some 
back/cross translation exercises. Same as SPA 380. P— SPN 319 or SPN 319L; or SPA 219 or 
SPA219L;orPOL 

329. Special Topics in Hispanic Linguistics. (3h) Investigation of key areas in Spanish languages 
research, such as dialectology, history, language acquisition, and usage. Same as SPA 388. 
P— SPN 321; or the combination of 319 or 316 and LIN 150; or POL 

Peninsular Courses 

331. Medieval Spain: A Cultural and Literary Perspective. (3h) Examination of literary, social, and 
cultural themes, such as: Quests and Discoveries, Pilgrimage and the Act of Reading, Images of 
Islam, The Judaic Tradition in Spanish Literature, and Spiritual Life and Ideal. P — SPN 317 or 
318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POL (CD) 

332. The Golden Age of Spain. (3h) Close analysis of literary texts, such as Lazarillo de Tormes, 
and study of the history, art, politics, and economics of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, 
with emphasis on themes such as the writer and society, humanism, the picaresque. Catholic 
mysticism, and power and politics. P— SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POL 

333. Eighteenth and Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature and Culture. (3h) Study of the major 
intellectual movements of the period: Enlightenment, Romanticism, Realism, and Naturalism in 
Spain through literary texts, essays, painting, and music. P — SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; 
or POL 



232 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



334. Voices of Modern Spain. (3h) Study of the multifaceted cultural identity of contemporary 
Spain through different literary genres, art, and film. Same as SPA 374. P — SPN 317 or 318; 
or SPA 217 or 218; or POl. (CD) 

335. Modern Spanish Novel. (3h) Study of representative Spanish novels from the generation of 
1898 through the contemporary period. Same as SPA 373. P— SPN 317 or 381; or SPA 217 or 218; 
or POI. 

336. Lorca, Dali, Bunuel: An Artistic Exploration. (3h) Study of the relationship of these three 
Spanish artists through their writings, paintings, and films, respectively, and of their impact on 
the twentieth century. Same as SPA 371. P— SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

337. Lorca in the Twentieth Century. (3h) Study of the life and works of poet, playwright, painter, 
and lecturer Federico Garcia Lorca within the social, cultural, literary, and artistic realities of the 
twentieth century, including Modernism and Surrealism. Emphasis is on Lorca's treatment of 
minority cultures, including the Gypsy, the Arab, and homosexuals. Same as SPA 372. 

P— SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

338. Love, Death, and Poetry. (3h) Study of the representation of universal themes in Spanish 
poetry from different historical periods. Same as SPA 352. P — SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; 
or POI. 

339. Introduction to Spanish Film Studies. (3h) Exploration of the cinematic production of Spain 
from its origin to current day, covering major film trends from Second Republic, Civil War, 
Dictatorship, and Democratic Spain. Focus is on films as narratives and as visual media, on 
Spanish culture and identity pictured through films, and on representative film-makers such as 
Bunuel, Saura, Almodovar and Amenabar. Same as SPA 350. P — SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 
218; or POI. 

340. Film Adaptations of Literary Works. (3h) Study of the cinematic and literary discourses 
through major Spanish literary works from different historical periods and their film adapta- 
tion. Same as SPA 370. P— SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

341 . Golden Age Drama and Society. (3h) Study of the theatre and social milieu of seventeenth- 
century Madrid, where the works of playivrights such as Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, and 
Calderon de la Barca were performed. Includes analysis of texts and of modern stagings of the 
plays. P— SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

343. Cervantes: The Birth of the Novel. (3h) Study of Don Quijote, the first modern novel, and 
several exemplary novels, and contemporary theoretical approaches to them. Also considers 
related art, music, and film. Includes discussion of themes such as the development of prose 
fiction, the novel as self-conscious genre, women and society, religion and humanism, national- 
ism, and imperialism. P— SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

349. Special Topics. (1.5h or 3h) Selected special topics in Spanish literature and culture. Can be 
repeated for credit. Same as SPA 375. P— SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

Transatlantic Courses 

Note: These courses may count either as Peninsular or Spanish- American for the major or minor. 

351. Transatlantic Renaissance. (3h) Study of the Spanish Golden Age period by reading and an- 
alyzing relevant peninsular and colonial texts within the broader political, social, and cultural 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 233 



contexts of the Spanish presence in the New World. Exposure to recent critical perspectives in 
early modem cultural studies. Same as SPA 348. P— SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

352. Contemporary Theatre in Spain and Spanish America. (3h) Study of contemporary Penin- 
sular and Spanish- American theatre within its political, social, cultural, and aesthetic context. 
Same as SPA 347. P— SPN 317 or 318; SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

353. Contemporary Women Novelists and their Female Characters. (3h) Study of representative 
novels by women writers from Spain and Latin America, with emphasis on the representation 
of the female protagonist within her cultural context. Same as SPA 349. P — SPN 317 or 318; or 
SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

Spanish-American Courses 

360. Colonial Spanish America. (3h) Explores the early Spanish-American colonial period along- 
side contemporary intellectuals' attempt to return to and recover this historical past. Readings 
include fifteenth- and sixteenth-century codices, post-conquest indigenous writings, Iberian 
chronicles and letters, as well as twentieth-century documents. Same as SPA 367. P — SPN 317 
or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

361 . Cultural and Literary Identity in Latin America: From Colonial to Postcolonial Voices. (3h) A 
study of a variety of texts from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries dealing with politi- 
cal emancipation, nation-building, and construction of continental identity. Same as SPA 360. 
P— SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

362. Romantic Nationalism, Avant-garde Nihilism, and the Deconstruction of Utopia. (3h) Study 
of Latin- American poetry, including symbolist, surrealist, and conversational poetry, "hap- 
penings," and artistic manifestoes. Politics, nation-building, liberation theology, and love are 
common themes. P— SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

363. Imagined "White" Nations: Race and Color in Latin America. (3h) Study of anti-slavery nar- 
ratives, nineteenth-century scientific racism, and twentieth-century Negritude and "negrismo" 
movements. An exploration of race, the stratification of color, and ethnic images in Latin Ameri- 
can literatiire and culhire. Same as SPA 369. P— SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. (CD) 

364. Transgressing Borders: Identity in Latin American and U.S. Latino Cultures. (3h) A socio- 
historical study of theories on culture, sexual politics, and race in relation to literary texts, lyrics 
of popular music, and art of Latin America and the diaspora. Same as SPA 351. P — SPN 317 or 
318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. (CD) 

365. Twentieth-Century Spanish-American Theatre. (3h) Study of major dramatic works from 
various Latin-American counh-ies. Same as SPA 363. P— SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; 
or POI. 

366. Latin-American Cinema and Ideology. (3h) Examination of major Latin-American films as 
cinematographic expressions of social and political issues. Same as SPA 361. P — SPN 317 or 318; 
or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

367. The Social Canvas of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Pablo Neruda. (3h) Exploration of the tech- 
niques used by two Nobel Prize-winning writers to create a literary vision of Latin America. 
Attention to humor, surrealism and the grotesque, and both writers' assimilation of personal 
anxieties to their portrayal of a social world. Same as SPA 354. P — SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 
or 218; or POI. 



234 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



368. Spanish-American Short Story. (3h) Intensive study of the twentieth-century Spanish-Amer- 
ican short story with emphasis on major trends and representative authors, such as Quiroga, 
Rulfo, Borges, Cortazar, Donoso, and Garcia Marquez. Same as SPA 364. P — SPN 317 or 318; 

or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

369. Spanish-American Novel. (3h) Study of the novel in Spanish America from its beginning 
through the contemporary period. Same as SPA 365. P— SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; 
or POI. 

370C. Cuban Literature. (3h) Study of Cuban literature from the eighteenth century to the present: 
romanticism, modernism, natviralism, the avant-garde movement, and the post-Revolutionary 
period. Same as SPA 368C. P — SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; or permission of director of 
the Cuba program. 

371 C. Afro-Cuban Cultural Expressions. (3h) Comprehensive study of Cuban culture with a 
concentration on the artistic manifestations of Afro-Cuban religions. Students study literature, 
art, film, music, and popular culture to analyze how Afro-Cuban culture constitutes national 
culture. Also listed as LAS 220C. Same as SPA 376C. Offered in Havana. (CD) 

372. Spanish-American Theatre: From Page to Stage. (3h) Study of the transition of a dramatic 
work from text to performance and the role of Spanish- American theatre as a vehicle for 
cultural values and socio-political issues. Includes rehearsals for the public staging of selected 
one-act plays. Proficiency in Spanish and willingness to act on stage are required. Same as SPA 
334. P— SPN 317 or 318 or 363; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

379. Special Topics. (1.5h or 3h) Selected special topics in Spanish- American literature and 
culture. Can be repeated for credit. Same as SPA 387. P— SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; 
or POI. 

379C. Special Topics. Same as SPA 387C. Offered in Cuba. 

Spanish for the Professional Sphere 

380. Spanish for the Professions. (1.5h or 3h) Spanish usage of a selected professional area. 
Emphasis on communication in typical situations and interactions, specialized vocabulary, 
cultural differences, and related technical readings in the subject matter. Topics offered from 
the following list: a. Health Occupations; b. Social Work; c. Law and Law Enforcement; 

d. Other (on demand). Same as SPA 228. P— SPN 316 or 319; or SPA 219 or 220; and POI. 

381 . Spanish Translation. (3h) Introduction to translation strategies through practice, with 
emphasis on Spanish into English. Focus is on translating in domains such as social science, 
computing, economics, the entertainment industry, banking, and journalism. P — SPN 324 or 
SPA 380 or POL 

382. Spanish/English Interpreting. (3h) Introduction to strategies of interpreting from Spanish 
into English, primarily. Intensive laboratory practice course to develop basic skills in con- 
secutive/escort/simultaneous interpreting. Some voice-over talent training is also included. 
P— SPN 316 or SPA 220 and POI. 

384. Internships for STL & SI. (1.5-3h) Under faculty supervision, a student undertakes a transla- 
tion/interpreting project at a translation bureau or translation department of a company /public 
organization. A community service-oriented internship is preferred for interpreting. Does not 
count toward major or minor. P — SPN 381 or 382. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 235 



385. Spanish for Medical Professions. (3h) Study of terminology and sociocultural issues relevant 
to interlinguistic medical communication. Oral and written practice in medical contexts. Same 
as SPA 327. P— SPN 319 or SPA 219 or POI. 

387. Introduction to Spanish for Business. (3h) Introduction to Spanish vocabulary and discourse 
in business. Emphasizes oral and written practices, reading, and Hispanic business culture, 

as well as a comprehensive analysis of different business topics and areas. Same as SPA 329. 
P— SPN 319 or SPA 219 or POI. 

388. Advanced Spanish for Business. (3h) Intensive immersion in the situations and skills of ad- 
vanced Spanish for business. Emphasis on oral and written business presentations and reading 
comprehension of case studies related to the Hispanic business world. Cross-cultural awareness 
of the Hispanic business world. Same as SPA 330. P— SPN 387 or SPA 329 or POI. 

389. Internship in Spanish for Business and the Professions. (1.5h-3 h.) Under faculty supervision, 
a student completes an internship in a bilingual business or professional setting. Does not count 
toward major or minor. Same as SPA 385. Pass/Fail only. P— SPN 387 or SPA 329. 

Independent Study and Honors 

397. Spanish Independent Study. (1.5h) Same as SPA 281. P— POI. 

398. Honors Directed Reading and Research. (1.5h) Required for honors in Spanish. Same as 
SPA 390. P— POI. 

399. Honors Directed Writing. (3h) Required for honors in Spanish. Same as SPA 391. P — POI. 

Semester or Year in Spain 

The department offers a year in Spain at Salamanca, the site of a well-established Spanish uni- 
versity. Students go as a group in the fall and /or spring semesters, accompanied by a professor 
from the College. 

No particular major is required for eligibility. However, students (1) should normally be of 
junior standing, (2) must have completed one course beyond Spanish 213, and (3) should be ap- 
proved by both their major department and the Department of Romance Languages. Interested 
students should contact Professor Candelas S. Gala in the Romance Languages department. 

As part of the University of Salamanca PEI program (Programa Especial Integrado), students 
may take regular courses with Spanish students in the following disciplines: anthropology, 
business, economics, education, linguistics, psychology, and translation /interpretation. 

198. Service Learning in Spanish Language. (1.5 h) Experiential learning in a Spanish-speaking 
country that links academic instruction, the study abroad experience, and community involve- 
ment. Pass /Fail only. P — POI. 

199. Internship in Spanish Language. (1.5h or 3h) Under faculty direction, a student undertakes 
a languages project in conjunction with a service commitment or internship in a Spanish-speak- 
ing country. Includes, but is not limited to, vocabulary building, keeping a journal, and reading 
professional material. Offered only in Salamanca. Pass/Fail only. P — SPN 319 or SPA 219; 

or POI. 



236 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



201. Intensive Spanish. (1.5h) Intensive study and practice of the oral and written language. 
Familiarization with Spanish culture and daily life. Classes in conversational and idiomatic 
Spanish, excursions to points of interest and lectures on selected topics. Pass /Fail only. 

316. Spanish Conversation. (3h) Based on cultural materials intended to increase aural skills 
and oral proficiency by systematically increasing vocabulary and reinforcing the command of 
specific grammatical points. Counts toward the major. Same as SPA 2209. P — 200-level course 
or equivalent. 

3161. Language Study in the Context of an Internship. (1.5, 3h) Development of oral proficiency 
and writing skills. Readings, discussions and writing assignments based on texts relevant to 
internships being undertaken by students. Must be taken in conjunction with 199. The combina- 
tion and 199 may count as a maximum of three hours toward the major or minor. P — SPN 319 
or SPA 219 or SPA 2199 or POI. 

317. Literary and Cultural Studies of Spain. (3h) Study of the cultural pluralism of Spanish 
through selected literary and artistic works to promote understanding of Spain's historical 
development. Same as SPA 217 or 2179. P — 200-level course or POI. 

318. Literary and Cultural Studies of Spanish America. (3h) Study of selected major works of 
Spanish-American literature within their historical and cultural contexts. Emphasis is on these 
contexts, including political structures, intellectual currents, art, music, and film, to promote 
understanding of Spanish- America's historical development. Same as SPA 218 or 2189. 

P— 200-level course or POI. 

319. Grammar and Composition. (4h) Study of grammar, composition, and pronunciation, with 
extensive practice of the written and oral language. Same as SPA 219 or 2199. P — 200-level 
course or POI. 

332. The Golden Age of Spain. (3h) Close analysis of literary texts, such as Lazarillo de Tormes, 
and study of the history, art, politics, and economics of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, 
with emphasis on themes such as the writer and society, humanism, the picaresque. Catholic 
mysticism, and power and politics. P— SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

334, Voices of Modern Spain. (3h) Study of the multifaceted cultural identity of contemporary 
Spain through different literary genres, art, and film. Same as SPA 374 or 3749. P — SPN 317 
or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

349. Special Topics in Spanish Literature and Culture. (1.5h or 3h) Topics vary. Can be repeated for 
credit. Same as SPA 375 or 3759. P— SPN 317; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

379. Special Topics in Spanish-American Literature and Culture. (1.5h or 3h) Topics vary. May be 
repeated for credit. Same as SPA 387 or 3879. P— SPN 317 or 318; or SPA 217 or 218; or POI. 

3871. International Business: Spain and Latin America. (3h) Study of the most characteristic 
features of the economic and financial situation and perspectives in Spain and Latin America. 
Focus is on coirmiunicating successfully in the world of Hispanic business and on acquiring an 
international view of that world and its cultural differences. Counts as elective for the Spanish 
major. Same as SPA 3289. P— SPN 319 or SPA 219 or POI. 

389. Internship in Spanish for Business and the Professions. (1.5h-3h) Under faculty supervision, 
a student completes an internship in a bilingual or Spanish-speaking business or professional 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



237 



setting as part of an abroad experience. Does not count toward major or minor. Same as SPA 
3859. Pass/Fail only. P— SPA 329. 

ART 2029. Spanish Art and Architecture. (3h) A study of the development and uniqueness of 
Spanish art and architecture within the framework of Mediterranean and Western art in gen- 
eral. Counts as an elective for the Spanish major. 

HST 201 9. General History of Spain. (3h) History of Spain from the pre-Roman period to the pres- 
ent day. Counts as elective for the Spanish major. 

POL 2029. Political Structures of Present-day Spain. (3h) Study of the various political elements 
which affect the modem Spanish state. Counts as an elective for the Spanish major. 

Program of Integrated Education (PEI) 

Courses offered only at the University of Salamanca in disciplines other than Spanish. Taught 
in Spanish. 

ANT 2029. Anthropology and Folklore. (3h) Study of conceptual tools to imderstand the role of 
folklore in culture as a complex, integrated system with an emphasis on culture's communica- 
tive, cognitive and symbolic functions. 

BUS 2129. Human Resource Management. (3h) Focuses on leadership skills associated with hu- 
man resources management (HRM). The traditional HRM functions of planning, recruitment, 
selection, training, development, and appraisal are addressed along with role of individual and 
group behaviors in HRM. P— BUS 211; SPN 319 or SPA 219; and POL 

BUS 2239. International Marketing. (3h) Examines the role of marketing within the international 
sphere of economics, law, politics, and finance. International marketing activities as they apply 
to product, place, pricing, and promotion are addressed along with global marketing strategies. 
P— BUS 221; SPN 319 or SPA 219; and POL 

ECN 2719. Economics of the European Community. (3h) Study of the economic integration, his- 
tory, community budget, commercial politics, agricultural policy, politics of regional devel- 
opment, other fields of community performance, and economic and monetary union in the 
European community. 

EDU 3739. Comparative and International Education. (3h) Comprehensive study of the current 
Spanish educational system and comparison with systems in neighboring countries. Aims to 
expand students' views about differing educational and pedagogical structures and to explore 
the comparative investigation of educational problems. 

PSY 2809. Psychology of Memory. (3h) Study of specialized knowledge regarding the most rel- 
evant aspects of memory function and important investigative techniques in this field. 

SPN 3821. Techniques in Consecutive Interpretation. (3h) Introduction to strategies of interpret- 
ing. P— SPN 316 or SPA 220; or POL 

SPN 329. Special Topics in Hispanic Linguistics. (3h) Investigation of key areas in Spanish lan- 
guages research, such as dialectology, history, language acquisition, and usage. P — SPN 321; or 
the combination of 319 or SPA 219 or SPN 316, SPA 220 and LIN 150; or POL 



238 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



Russian and East European Studies (REE) 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 
Coordinator Associate Professor of History Susan Z. Rupp 

Russian 210 or 212 or equivalent proficiency in another East European language is required, 
plus fifteen hours from the following list. Three of these fifteen hours must be REE 298, 
Research Project in Russian and East European Studies. 

REE 298. Research Project in Russian and East European Studies. (3h) Semester-long research 
project pursued independently by a student (generally in the senior year) under the guidance 
of a faculty member in the relevant field of study. A second faculty member consults with the 
student regarding his or her project as well as serving as a second reader. The course culminates 
in the completion of a seminar-length paper based upon primary research. 

Electives for Russian and East European Studies 

Additional elechve courses may have been approved since publication of this bulletin. The 
program coordinator maintains a complete list of all approved elective courses. For course 
descriptions, see the relevant department's listings in this publication. 

COM 351B. Comparative Communication: Russia. (1.5h) 
ECN 252. International Finance. (3h) 

253. Economies in Transition. (3h) 
HST 230. Russia: Origins to 1865. (3h) 

231. Russia and the Soviet Union: 1865 to the Present. (3h) 
HMN 215. Germanic and Slavic Literature. (3h) 
218. Eastern European Literature. (3h) 
POL 232. Politics in Russia and Eastern Europe. (3h) 
RUS Three additional hours at the 200-level. 

With the approval of the coordinator, students may fulfill the language requirement by equiva- 
lent study of another East European language (to be pursued independently under the auspices 
of the German and Russian department). Students may apply all relevant seminars, coUoquia, 
or independent studies in any of the above departments to the minor. 



RUSSIAN AND EAST EUROPEAN STUDIES 



239 



Sociology (SOC) 

Chair Ian M.Taplin 

Washington M. Wingate Professor of Sociology Charles F. Longino 

Rubin Professor of American Ethnic Studies Earl Smith 

Professors Catherine!. Harris, Ian M.Taplin 

Research Professor of Sociology and Gerontology Eleanor P. Stoller 

Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Fellow and Associate Professor Angela Mattery 

Associate Professors H. Kenneth Bechtel, Joseph Scares 

Assistant Professors R. Saylor Breckenridge, Catherine Harnois, Ana M. Wahl, David Yamane 

Visiting Assistant Professor Jeffrey Rosenthal 
Visiting Instructor Corey Remie 

A major in sociology requires thirty-one hours. Students are strongly encouraged to complete 
SOC 151, 370, 371, and 372 by the end of their junior year. Shxdents should take SOC 151 in the 
freshmen or sophomore year, SOC 370 and 371 in the fall of their junior year, and SOC 372 in 
the spring of their junior year. A minimum average of 2.0 in all sociology courses is required at 
the time the major is declared. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in all sociology courses is 
required for graduation. 

A minor in sociology requires fifteen hours and must include SOC 151 and 370. A minimum 
grade point average of 2.0 in sociology courses is required at the time the minor is declared. A 
minimum grade point average of 2.0 in sociology courses is required for certification as a minor. 
Students who intend to pursue a sociology minor are encouraged to notify the department 
early in their junior year, and they are invited to participate in all departmental functions. 

Honors. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Sociology," highly qualified majors 
are invited to apply to the department for admission to the honors program. They must com- 
plete a senior research project, document their research, and satisfactorily defend their work in 
an oral examination. For additional information members of the departmental faculty should be 
consulted. 

A student who selects sociology to fulfill the Division IV requirement must take one of the 
following courses: SOC 151, 152, 153, or 154. No introductory-level course is required for stu- 
dents taking a sociology course as an elective unless specified in the course description. 

151. Principles of Sociology. (3h) General introduction to the field; social organization and dis- 
organization, socialization, culture, social change, and other aspects. Required for all sociology 
majors and minors. (D) 

1 52. Social Problems. (3h) Survey of contemporary American social problems. (D) 

1 53. Contemporary Families. (3h) Social basis of the family, emphasizing the problems growing 
out of modern conditions and social change. (D) 

1 54. The Sociology of Deviant Behavior. (3h) A sociological analysis of the nature and causes 
of and societal reaction to deviant behavior patterns such as mental illness, suicide, drug and 
alcohol addiction, sexual deviation, and criminal behavior (D) 

240. Asian-American Legacy: A Social History of Community Adaptation. (3h) Introduction to the 
history, culture, and literature of the Asian- American communities, exploring issues of migration. 



240 



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assimilation, and the process of developing Asian- American identities in the twentieth and 
early twenty-first centuries. Also listed as AES 240. (CD) 

301 . Sociology of Religion. (3h) Introduction to the sociological analysis of religion, including 
religious beliefs and experiences, the cultural context of religion, varieties of religious organiza- 
tion, religious change and social change. Also listed as REL 351. 

302. Topics in Sociology of Religion. (3h) Advanced seminar with emphasis on current topics in 
the sociology of religion such as theoretical and methodological debates, religion and public 
life, religious pluralism, or spirituality and its organizational expression. 

303. Business and Society. (3h) Historical development, organization, and current problems of 
business enterprises in American society. 

305. Gender in Society. (3h) The significance of gender in society for individuals and institutions. 
An examination of differential gender experiences based on race, class, and sexual orientation. 
Consideration of feminism as a social movement and the possibility for social change. (CD) 

308. Sociology of Art. (3h) Art as an institution, its functions, organization, and relationship to 
social change and to the communication of meanings. 

309. Sexuality and Society. (3h) Study of the societal forces that impinge on human sexual 
behavior, emphasizing the effects of social change, the implications of changing gender roles, 
cross-cultural and subcultural variations, and the influence of the mass media. 

31 1. Women in Professions. (3h) Emphasis on the status of women in professional occupations 
(e.g., law, medicine, science, business, etc.) in socio-historical perspective. 

316. Conflict Management in Organizations. (3h) Examination of conflict management and social 
control in organizations, focusing on power structures, management styles, and processes of 
dispute resolution. 

318. Social Stratification in the American South. (3h) Exploration of social stratification in the 
labor force, the school system, the justice system, and the family. Comprises an examination of 
theories of stratification, a two-week field seminar in the South and a service learning project. 
Summer session only. 

325. Self and Society: An Interactionist Perspective. (3h) Analysis of the effects of social relation- 
ships upon self-development, self-preservation, and the learning of social roles and norms, with 
special emphasis on language and symbolic interaction. 

333. The Sociology of Cities. (3h) Examination of the patterns of urbanization worldwide. Ex- 
plores the dynamics of urban growth resulting from economic, social, political and ecological 
processes. 

334. Sociology of Education. (3h) An evaluation of the major theories and significant empirical 
literature, both historical and statistical, on the stiucture and effects of educational institutions. 

335. Sociology of Health and Illness. (3h) Analysis of the social variables associated with health 
and illness. 

336. Sociology of Health Care. (3h) Analysis of health care systems, including the social organi- 
zation of medical practice, health care payment, the education of medical practitioners, and the 
division of the labor in health care. 



SOCIOLOGY 



241 



337. Aging in Modern Society. (3h) Basic social problems and processes of aging. Social and 
psychological issues discussed. Course requirements include field placement in a nursing home 
or similar institution. P — POL 

338. Sociological Issues in Criminal Justice. (3h) Introduction to the structure, organization and 
operation of the various components of the criminal justice system with emphasis on the police 
and correctional institutions. 

339. Sociology of Violence. (3h) Survey of the societal factors associated with individual and 
collective violence. Discussion focuses on the contemporary and historical conditions that have 
contributed to various patterns of violence in American society. 

341 . Criminology. (3h) Crime, its nature, causes, consequences, methods of treatment, and 
prevention. 

342. Juvenile Delinquency. (3h) The nature and extent of juvenile delinquency; an examination 
of prevention, control, and treatment problems. 

343. Sociology of Law. (3h) Consideration is given to a variety of special issues: conditions under 
which laws develop and change, relationships between the legal and political system, and the 
impact of social class and stratification upon the legal order. 

345. Advanced Topics Seminar in Criminology. (3h) Emphasizes current topics in the field of 
criminology and criminal justice such as measurement issues, ethical issues, history, crime and 
mass media, and theoretical debates. P — SOC 341 and POI. 

347. Society, Culture, and Sport. (3h) Examination of the interrelationship of sport and other 
social institutions. Emphasis is on the study of both the structure of sport and the functions of 
sport for society. 

348. Sociology of the Family. (3h) The family as a field of sociological study. Assessment of 
significant historical and contemporary writings. Analysis of the structure, organization, and 
function of the family in America. 

351. Management and Organizations. (3h) Study of macro-organizational processes and changes 
in contemporary industrial societies and their effects upon managerial systems, managerial 
ideologies, and managers in firms. 

352. White-collar Crime. (3h) Study of criminal activity committed in the course of legitimate oc- 
cupations including workplace crime, graft, and business crime. P — SOC 341. 

353. Families in Later Life. (3h) Analysis of current issues affecting later-life families, including 
the unmarried, marital relations, divorce, widowhood, remarriage, kinship, family care-giving, 
and institutional care. 

354. Women in Poverty in the U.S. (3h) Examination of the structural causes of poverty and its 
consequences, with specific emphasis on women's overrepresentation in poverty and how 
gender intersects with race, family status, age, and place. 

358. Population and Society. (3h) Techniques used in the study of population data. Reciprocal 
relationship of social and demographic variables. 

359. Race and Ethinic Relations. (3h) Racial and ethnic group prejudice and discrimination and 
their effect on social relationships. Emphasis on psychological and sociological theories of 
prejudice. 



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360. Social Inequality. (3h) Study of structured social inequality with particular emphasis on 
economic class, social status, and political power. (CD) 

361. Sociology of African-American Families. (3h) Examines the social and economic condi- 
tions of family life, the social history of the African- American family, patterns of marriage and 
childbearing, contemporary urban families, and intersections with schooling, work, U.S. justice 
system, sports, and prevailing social, economic, and political conditions. (CD) 

362. Work, Conflict, and Change. (3h) Changing trends in the U.S. labor force. The individual's 
view of work and the effect of large organizations on white- and blue-collar workers. Use of 
some cross-cultural data. 

363. Global Capitalism. (3h) Analysis of industrial organization, including discussion of market 
relations and the behavior of firms, the structure of industrial development, and labor relations 
and the growth of trade unions. Also listed as INS 363. 

364. Political Sociology. (3h) Examination of the structure and organization of power in society 
with emphasis on political socialization, political ideology, and the growth of the welfare state. 

365. Technology, Culture, and Change. (3h) Examination of the interrelated forces that shape 
change in organizations and societies; from the emergence of capitalist markets to the systems, 
controls, and information revolution of the twenty-first century. 

366. The Sociological Analysis of Film. (3h) Examines the intersection of economic, organization- 
al, and cultural sociology using films and the film industry as focal examples. 

367. The Sociology of Culture. (3h) Examines the most powerful explanatory schools in sociology 
on the fields of cultural production and consumption. Topics include: stylistic change and the 
consumption of visual and performance arts; musical tastes; the production and consumption 
of literature; museum attendance; education and culture; and architecture and design. 

370. Sociological Theory. (3h) An introduction to the classic works of social theory — "classic" 
not only as time-honored explanations of past events, but also because they provide the intel- 
lectual foundations for contemporary and historical research. Theorists covered include Smith, 
WoUstonecraft, de Tocqueville, Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Freud, Simmel, DuBois, and Goffman. 
P— SOC 151 or POL 

371. Social Statistics. (4h) Computer-based survey of basic statistics utilized in sociological 
research. A student who receives credit for this course may not also receive credit for ANT 380, 
BIO 380, BUS 201, or HES 262. Lab— 1 hour. P— SOC 151 or POL (QR) 

372. Research Methods in Sociology. (3h) Overview of both quantitative and qualitative research 
methods. Research projects required. P — SOC 371. (QR) 

373. Honors Seminar. (3h) Seminar on selected problems in sociology. Intended for students in 
the departmental honors program. P — SOC 372 and POL 

374. Honors Research. (3h) Directed study toward completion of the project begun in SOC 373 
and to the writing and defense of an honors paper. P — SOC 373 and POL 

375. Gender, Power, and Violence. (3h) Research-centered study of various issues related to 
violence, power, and gender in American society. Emphasis is placed on sociological analysis of 
competing theoretical explanations of violence with respect to race, class, gender, religion, and 
sexual orientation. Also listed as WGS 310. (CD) 



SOCIOLOGY 



243 



385, 386. Special Problems Seminar. (3h) Intensive investigation of current scientific research 
within the discipline which concentrates on problems of contemporary interest. P — POL 

398, 399. Individual Study. (l-3h, l-3h) Reading, research, or internship courses designed to 
meet the needs and interests of selected students, to be carried out under the supervision of a 
departmental faculty member. 

Spanish Studies 

(Foreign Area Study) 
Coordinator Charles E.Taylor Professor of Romance Languages Candelas S. Gala 

Students are required to participate in the Spanish program at Salamanca for one or two 
semesters. They also are required to take History 2019., General History of Spain (3h), taught 
in Salamanca; Political Science 2029., Political Structures of Present Day Spain (3h), taught in 
Salamanca; Art 2029., Spanish Art and Architecture (3h), taught in Salamanca; and Spanish 217., 
Literary and Cultural Studies of Spain (3h), also taught in Salamanca. 

Students must take nine additional hours from the advanced courses in Spanish language 
and the literature and culture of Spain offered by the Department of Romance Languages, or 
from those offered at the University of Salamanca. 

Theatre and Dance 

Chair Mary Wayne-Thomas 

Junior Faculty Fellow and Associate Professor Cynthia M. Gendrich 

Director of Dance and Associate Professor Nina Lucas 

Zachary T. Smith Associate Professor Sharon Andrews 

Associate Professors Jonathan H.Christman, Jane Kathleen Curry, Mary Wayne-Thomas 

Assistant Professors Brook M. Davis, Christina Tsoules Soriano 

Director of University Theatre and Lecturer John E. R. Friedenberg 

Lecturers Zanna Beswick (London), Leah Roy, Brantly Shapiro 

Adjunct Instructors Ray Collins, Fanchon Cordell, InezYarborough Liggins, 

Robert Simpson, Deborah Spencer 
Visiting Associate Professor Lynn Book 

Theatre (THE) 

A major in theatre consists of a minimum of thirty-six hours, including THE 110 or 112, 130, 140, 
150, 250, 260, 261, 340, 381, and 385. (Shidents interested in a theabre major should elect THE 
112.) Four semesters of THE 100 or three semesters of THE 100 plus THE llOL also are required. 
Majors may choose their remaining courses froiii offerings at the 200 level or higher listed un- 
der the Department of Theatre and Dance. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in all theatre 
courses attempted is required for graduation. Majors should consult with their advisers about 
additional regulations. Theatie majors are required to take two courses in dramatic literature. 
No more than three hours of THE 294 may be counted toward the thirty-six hours required for 
the major; up to a maximum of nine hours or three courses of THE 294 may be counted beyond 
the thirty-six hours in the major. Those who plan to be theatre majors are urged to begin their 
studies during their first year. 



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Honors. Highly qualified majors (departmental grade point average of 3.3, overall grade point 
average of 3.0) are invited by the department to apply for admission to the honors program in 
theatre. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Theatre," a student must successfully 
complete THE 292 (3h) with a grade of B or better. Honors projects may consist of a) a research 
paper of exceptional quality; b) a creative project in playwriting or design; or c) a directing or 
acting project. The theatre honors project must be presented and defended before the depart- 
mental Honors Committee. The department can furnish honors candidates with complete 
information on preparation and completion of projects. 

A minor in theatre requires eighteen hours: THE 110 or 112, 140, 150, 260 or 261, two THE elec- 
tives (at the 200 level or higher), and two semesters of THE 100 or one semester of THE 100 plus 
THE llOL. Theatre minors are required to take one course in dramatic literature from the De- 
partments of English or Classical Languages or from humanities. Any person who is interested 
in a theatre major or minor should contact the chair of the department soon after arrival on the 
campus. 

100. Participation. (.5h) Attendance /participation in Mainstage and Studio performances and 
other events as established by the department. Specific attendance/participation requirements 
are established at the beginning of each semester. Assignments for technical production are 
made through consultation with the technical and design faculty. May be repeated for credit. 

no. Introduction to the Theatre. (3h) For the theatie novice. Survey of the theory and practice 
of the major disciplines of theatre art: acting, directing, playwriting, and design. Optional 
lab— THE llOL. (D) 

1 lOL. Introduction to Theatre Lab. (Ih) Participation in production team on Mainstage as assigned. 
C— THE 112. Optional with THE 110. 

112. Introduction to the Theatre. (3h) For the experienced theatre student. Survey of the theory 
and practice of the major disciplines of theatre art: acting, directing, play^vriting, and design. 
Students planning to major in theatre are encouraged to take THE 112. Lab required, THE llOL. 
Credit is not given for both THE 110 and 112. (D) 

126. Stage Makeup. (1.5h) Study of the design and application of theatrical makeup in relation- 
ship to historical period and character development. 

130. Dynamics of Voice and Movement. (3h) Building awareness of the actor's instrument 
through the development of basic vocal and physical skills, emphasizing relaxation, clarity, 
expressiveness, and commitment, along with spontaneity, centering, and basic technical skills. 

140. Acting I. (3h) Fundamental acting theory and techniques including exercises, monologues, 
and scene work. 

140F. Acting for Freshmen. (3h) A concentrated study and practice of basic acting skills for first- 
year students. Credit is not given for both THE 140 and THE 140F. 

141. On-Camera Performance. (3h) Introduction to the theory and practice of performing for the 
camera. May include basic method acting, newscasting, commercials, and film acting. 

Also listed as COM 116. 

144. Mime. (1.5h) Introductory study of basic mime forms. The student gains skills and 
vmderstanding of this theatiical form through practical exercises, readings, rehearsals, and 
performances. 

THEATRE AND DANCE 245 



146. Performance Techniques. (3h) Focuses on acting styles appropriate to various modes of 
theatrical production. Specialized techniques such as dance, stage combat, etc., may also be 
included. Suitable for non-majors. 

150. Introduction to Design and Production. (4h) Introduction to the fundamentals of theatrical 
design and technology including script analysis, design development, and presentation meth- 
ods. Through the lab, the student develops basic skills in theatre technology. Lab — three hours. 
(D) 

1 55. Stagecraft. (3h) Focuses on contemporary materials, construction methods, and rigging 
practices employed in the planning, fabrication and installation of stage scenery. Emphasis is on 
using current technologies for problem solving. 

181. Acting Workshop. (1.5h) Scene work with student directors. Pass/Fail only. 

1 880. The Contemporary English Theatre. (Ih) Exploration of the English theatre through theatre 
attendance in London and other English theatre centers. Readings, lectures. Participants submit 
reviews of the plays and complete a journal of informal reactions to the plays, the sites and the 
variety of cultural differences observed. Two weeks. Ojfered in London before spring term. 
Pass /Fail only P— POL 

230. Advanced Dynamics. (3h) Focus on opening and strengthening the actor's instrument by 
building on work done in THE 130. P— THE 130. 

240. Class Act. (3h) An interdisciplinary theatre class that moves dramatic literature from page 
to stage as students prepare and present scenes used in courses throughout the University. 
P— THE 140 or POL (D) 

245. Acting II. (3h) Advanced study and practice of the skills introduced in Acting L P — THE 130 
and 140. (D) 

246. Period and Style. (3h) Study of social customs, movement, dances, and theatrical styles 
relating to the performance of drama in historical settings as well as in period plays. Includes 
performances in class. P— THE 130 or 230 and 140. (D) 

250. Theatrical Scene Design. (3h) Study of the fundamental principles and techniques of stage 
design. Drafting, model building, perspective rendering, historical research, and scene painting 
are emphasized. P— THE 150. (D) 

251. Costume and Makeup Design. (3h) Study of the fundamental principles and techniques of 
costume and makeup design with an emphasis on historical research. The basics of costume 
rendering, costume construction, and stage makeup are explored. (D) 

252. Lighting. (3h) Exploration of the lighting designer's process from script to production. 

A variety of staging situations are studied, including proscenium, thrust, and arena production. 
P— THE 150. (D) 

253. Sound for Theatre. (1.5h) Developing and executing sound design for theatrical production 
from concept to integration into performance. Covers recording, digital editing, mixing, and 
playback. P— THE 150 or POL 

254. Scenic Art for Theatre. (1.5h) Hands-on introduction to the tools and techniques employed 
by scenic artists for contemporary stage and film. Coursework includes an introduction to 



246 



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sculpting as well as a variety of projects and exercises in decorative and figurative painting. 
P— THE no or 112, 150, or POL 

255. History of Costume. (3h) Survey of the development of clothing and fashion with emphasis 
on historical and cultural influences and their application to costuming in art. (D) 

259. Theatre Management: Principles and Practices. (3h) Reviews the development of theatre 
management in the U.S. with emphasis on the role of the producer; explores commercial and 
not-for-profit theatre with attention to planning, personnel, and the economics of theatre. In- 
cludes readings, lectures, and reports. P — THE 110 or 112. (D) 

260. History of Western Theatre I (Beginnings to 1642). (3h) Survey of the development of West- 
ern theatre and drama through the Greek, Roman, medieval, and Renaissance theatres to 1642; 
includes lectures, readings and reports. Suitable for non-majors. (D) 

261 . History of Western Theatre II (1 642 to the Present). (3h) Survey of Western theatre and drama 
from the French Neoclassic theatre through the English Restoration, the eighteenth century. 
Romanticism, Realism, the revolts against Realism and the post-modern theatre; includes 
lectures, readings and reports. Suitable for non-majors. (D) 

270. Theatre in Education. (3h) Practical experience for theatre and education students to work 
together with children in the classroom using theatre to teach core curriculum. Emphasizes 
methods and techniques as well as the development and implementation of creative lesson 
plans. Weekly public school teaching experience and seminar. Also listed as EDU 223. 

283. Practicum. (1-1. 5h) Projects under faculty supervision. May be repeated for no more than 
three hours. P— POD. 

290. Special Seminar. (1.5-3h) Intensive study of selected topics in theatre. May be repeated. 

292. Theatre Honors. (3h) Tutorial involving intensive work in the area of special interest for 
qualified seniors who wish to graduate with departmental honors. P — POD. 

294. Individual Study. (l-3h) Research and readings in an area of interest to be approved and 
supervised by a faculty adviser. May be taken for no more than three times for a total of not 
more than nine hours. P — POI. 

295. Development and Performance. (l-4h) Intensive experiential course designed to research 
and develop a theatre piece resulting in performance. Focus varies. 

2650. The English Theatre, 1660-1940. (3h) Study of the major developments in the English 
theatre from the Restoration to World War II, including the plays, playwrights, actors, audi- 
ences, theatre architecture, theatre management, costumes, and sets. Field trips include visits to 
theatres, museums, and performances. Offered in London. (D) 

2660. Modern English and Continental Drama and the London Stage. (3h) Studies in the works of 
major plajrwrights of England and Europe from 1875 to the present. May also include contem- 
porary production of classic plays. Emphasis is on plays which are currently being presented in 
London theatres. Offered in London. (D) 

320. British Drama to 1642. (3h) British drama from its beginning to 1642, exclusive of Shake- 
speare. Representative cycle plays, moralities, Elizabethan and Jacobean tiagedies, comedies, 
and tragicomedies. Also listed as ENG 320. 



THEATRE AND DANCE 247 



323. Shakespeare. (3h) Thirteen representative plays illustrating Shakespeare's development as 
a poet and dramatist. Also listed as ENG 323. 

336. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Drama. (3h) British drama from 1660 to 1780, 
including representative plays by Dryden, Etherege, Wycherley, Congreve, Goldsmith, and 
Sheridan. Also listed as ENG 336. 

340. Directing. (3h) An introduction to the theory and practice of play directing. For majors only. 
P— THE 110/112, 140 and 150. C— THE 381 and 250. 

344. Acting Shakespeare. (3h) Practical study of varying styles in interpreting and acting Shake- 
speare's plays from the time of the Elizabethans to the present day. P — THE 130 and 140. (D) 

360. Playwriting. (3h) Examines the elements of dramatic structure and their representations in 
a variety of dramatic writings. It explores the fundamentals of playwriting through a series of 
writing exercises. 

372. Contemporary Drama. (3h) Considers varieties of form and substance in plays and per- 
formance texts from Godot to the present. Readings cover such playwrights as Beckett, Pinter, 
Stoppard, Churchill, Wertenbaker, Albee, Shepard, Fornes, Mamet, Wilson, Soyinka, Fugard, 
and Foreman. Also listed as ENG 394. 

374. Contemporary World Drama. (3h) Considers varieties of form and substance in plays and 
performance texts from outside the mainstream of the Western theatrical tradition. Focus varies, 
for example Asian and Asian- American plajrwrights or drama of the Middle East. (CD) 

375. American Drama. (3h) Historical overview of drama in the United States, covering such 
playw^rights as Boucicault, Mowatt, O'Neill, Glaspell, Wilder, Williams, Miller, Hansberry, 
Albee, Shepard, Norman, Hwang, Vogel, Mamet, and Wilson. Also listed as ENG 375. 

376. Multicultural American Drama. (3h) Examination of the dramatic works of playwrights 
from various racial and ethnic communities such as Asian American, Native American, African 
American, and Latino. Includes consideration of issues, themes, style, and form. Also listed as 
ENG 393. (CD) 

381. Directing Workshop. (1.5h) Practical application of directing techniques in realistic scene 
study utilizing student actors. C — THE 340. 

385. Studio Production. (1.5h) The organization, techniques and problems encountered in the 
production of a play for the public. P — THE 340 and POD. 

390, 391. Special Seminar. (l-3h) Intensive study of selected topics in the theatre. May be repeated. 

392. Special Topics in Dramatic Literature. (l-3h) Intensive study of selected plays and/or perfor- 
mance texts. 

393. Special Topics in Dramatic Literature: Cultural Diversity. (3h) Intensive study of selected plays 
and /or performance texts, focusing on cultural differences — for instance women playwrights, 
GLBT playwrights, or class-focused works. (CD) 



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Dance (DCE) ' 

A dance minor requires 18 hours and must include: 

One Modem course— DCE 120 (1.5h), 221 (1.5h), or 222 (1.5h); 

Dance composition — DCE 123 (3h); 

One Jazz course— DCE 126 (1.5h), 226 (1.5h), or 227 (1.5h); 

One Ballet course— DCE 127 (1.5h), 229 (1.5h), or 231 (1.5h); 

One Dance Performance— DCE 128A (Ih) or 128B (Ih); 

Senior Dance Project— DCE 200 (l-1.5h); 

One History of Dance— DCE 202 (3h) or 203 (3h); 

Improvisation— DCE 205 (1.5h); 

Introduction to Design and Production — THE 150 (4h) 

101. Beginning Tap Dance. (1.5h) Fundamentals of tap dance technique with emphasis placed on 
technique, rhythm, vocabulary, and performance qualities. May be taken two times for credit. 

120. Beginning Modern Dance Technique. (1.5h) Fundamentals of modern dance technique, with 
emphasis placed on movement concepts, vocabulary, technique, alignment, placement, and 
flexibility. May be taken two times for credit. 

1 22. Special Topics in Dance. (l-3h) Intensive study of selected topics in dance. May be repeated. 

123. Dance Composition. (3h) Fundamental study of improvisation, composition, and choreog- 
raphy. P— DCE 221, 226 or 229. 

124. Social Dance. (1.5h) Fundamental techniques of social dance, providing basic skills, con- 
cepts of movement, style and fundamental step patterns found in social dance rhythms. Learn 
basic smooth dances, rhythm dances, Latin- American dances, and Cuban dances. 

125. Folk and Social Dance. (1.5h) Fundamentals of folk cind social dance, providing the basic 
skills, concepts of movement, style and fundamental step patterns of folk and social dance. 
Emphasis on the development of fundamental dance skills and practice in utilizing dance 
techniques. 

126. Beginning Jazz Dance. (1.5h) Fundamentals of jazz technique with emphasis on alignment, 
isolations, flexibility, basic turns, jumps, and combinations. May be taken two times for credit. 

127. Beginning Classical Ballet Techniques. (1.5h) Fundamentals of classical ballet technique with 
emphasis on alignment, placement, flexibility, barre work, adagio and petite allegro. May be 
taken two times for credit. 

128. Dance Performance. (Ih) Practical experience in the areas of rehearsal, choreographing, 
production and performance, as a choreographer, and /or performer in the Fall Faculty /Guest 
Artist Concert and /or Spring Dance Concert. May be taken eight times for credit. 

128A. Performance 128B. Choreography 

1 30. Movement for Men. (Ih) A begirming level dance class for male students that surveys jazz, 
modem and/or ballet techniques. Emphasis on flexibility, coordination, and efficiency of move- 
ment. May be taken two times for credit. Eight week course. 

200. Senior Dance Project. (1-1 .5h) Investigation of selected semi-professional problems involv- 
ing the creative process of choreography, study of notation, research idea, or production. 



THEATRE AND DANCE 



249 



201. Intermediate Tap Dance. (1.5h) Progressive development of technique and vocabulary from 
DCE 101 with emphasis on exploring rhythm, dynamics, and performance qualities. May be 
taken four times for credit. P — DCE 101 or POL 

202. History of Dance. (3h) Survey of the development of dance as a performing art from the 
Renaissance to the present with an emphasis on scope, style, and function. (D) 

203. Twentieth Century Modern Dance History. (3h) An exploration of the history of modem 
dance from Isadora Duncan to contemporary modem dance trends in the U.S. and abroad. (D) 

205. Improvisation. (1.5h) An investigation of the art and technique of improvised dancing. 
The course borrows from visual art, poetry, literature, theatre, and music as catalysts for origi- 
nal movement generation. P — DCE 120 or 221. 

221. Intermediate Modern Dance Technique. (1.5h) Progressive development of movement 
concepts and vocabulary from DCE 120 with emphasis on exploring both the classical and con- 
temporary techniques of modem dance. May be taken four times for credit. P — DCE 120 or POI. 

222. Advanced Modern Dance Technique. (1.5h) Progressive development of the concepts of DCE 
221 with emphasis on qualitative performance, virtuosity, and versatility in a variety of techni- 
cal forms within the modern dance discipline. May be taken four times for credit. P — DCE 221 
or POI. 

226. Intermediate Jazz Dance. (1.5h) Pursues the mastery of basic jazz technique along with 
more complex center floor combinations. Emphasis is on performance qualities and musicality. 
May be taken four times for credit. P — DCE 126 or POI. 

227. Advanced Jazz Dance. (1.5h) Pursues the mastery of jazz technique along with more com- 
plex center floor combinations. Emphasis is on performance qualities, musicality, technique, 
virtuosity, and creativity. May be taken four times for credit. P — DCE 226 or POI. 

229. Intermediate Classical Ballet. (1.5h) Pursues the mastery of basic ballet technique along with 
more complex barre and center combinations, performance qualities, and musicality. May be 
taken four times for credit. P — DCE 127 or POI. 

231 . Advanced Classical Ballet. (1.5h) Continues the mastery of basic ballet technique along with 
more complex barre and center combinations, performance qualities, musicality, and pointe 
work. May be taken four times for credit. P — DCE 229 or POI. 

241 . Advanced Tap Dance. (1.5h) A progressive development of the concepts of DCE 201 with 
emphasis on qualitative performance, virtuosity, and versatility in a variety of technical forms 
within the tap dance discipline. May be taken four times for credit. P — DCE 201 or POI. 



250 



THEATRE AND DANCE 



Urban Studies (URB) 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 

Coordinator Professor of Economics Donald E. Frey 

The interdisciplinary minor in urban studies requires fifteen hours, of which at least nine must 
be chosen from the following courses. Only one course from the art electives is permitted to 
count toward the minor. For course descriptions, see the relevant department's listings in this 
publication. 

ART 233. American Architecture. (3h) or 288. Modern Architecture. (3h) or 
396. Art History Seminar. 1. Architecture and Urbanism. (3h) 

ECN 246. Urban Economics. (3h) 

POL 222. Urban Politics. (3h) 

SOC 333. The Sociology of Cities. (3h) 

URB 250. Urban Planning. (3h) 
270. Individual Study. (3h) 

Courses needed to complete the remaining six hours may be chosen from among the following 
courses. Additional elective courses may have been approved since publication of this bulletin. 
The program coordinator maintains a complete list of all approved elective courses. For course 
descriptions, see the relevant department's listings in this publication. 

EDU 271. Geography: The Human Environment. (3h) 
HST 2253. History of Venice. (3h) Offered in Venice. 

2260. History of London. (3h) Offered in London. 

352. U.S. Social History II. (3h) 
SOC 152. Social Problems. (3h) 
URB 280. Urban Internship. (3h) 

Students intending to minor in urban studies should constdt with the coordinator as early as 
possible to discuss scheduling of courses not offered annually, careers in urban studies, and 
other issues. In exceptional cases, the coordinator may approve limited substitutions for the 
listed courses. 

250. Urban Planning. (3h) The principles of urban planning and urban form. Some typical topics 
are urban history and its relationship to urban form, the features of communities, the explora- 
tion of urban development practices, and the role of plarming policies and urban design in the 
planning process. ' 

270. Individual Study. (3h) Directed readings in a specialized area of urban studies not otherwise 
in the curriculum. Under supervision of an instructor teaching in the minor. P — POI and 
approval of the coordinator of the minor. 

280. Urban Internship. (3h) Field work in agency addressing urban issues. Related readings and 
paper are required. Under direction of an instructor teaching in the minor. P — POI and 
approval of the coordinator of the minor. 



URBAN STUDIES 25I 



Women's and Gender Studies (^NGS) 

(Interdisciplinary Minor) 

Director Wanda Balzano 

Professors Mary K. DeShazer, Linda Nielsen 

Core (Rotating) Faculty Sarah Barbour (Associate Professor of Romance Languages), 

Anne Boyle (Professor of English), Mary F. Foskett (Associate Professor of Religion), 

Michele Gillespie (Kahle Family Associate Professor of History), 

Angela Mattery (Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Fellow and Associate Professor of Sociology), 

Perry L. Patterson (Professor of Economics) 
Adjunct Professors Shannon Gilreath, Gary Ljungquist, Michelle J. Naughton, Teresa Smith 

Visiting Assistant Professor Patricia K.Willis 

Women's and gender studies (WGS) provides an opportunity for study and dialogue on a 
broad range of topics related not only to feminist contributions to the fundamental fields of hu- 
man knowledge and achievement, but also to interdisciplinary studies of feminisms, masculin- 
ity, sex, gender and sexuality. 

The interdisciplinary minor in women's and gender studies must include WGS 221 and 321, 
and a minimum of twelve additional hours, for a total of eighteen hours. If courses not desig- 
nated WGS are taken, they must be from an approved list on file with the director; examples of 
these courses are listed. Students may count no more than six hours from their major(s) toward 
the minor. 

A student intending to minor in women's and gender studies should consult the director of 
women's and gender studies, preferably during their first or early in their second year. Students 
pursuing the minor are encouraged to take WGS 221 in the first or sophomore year, two or 
three courses in the sophomore and junior years, and complete the remaining hours, including 
the capstone research seminar, WGS 321, in the senior year. 

1 01 . Window on Women's and Gender Studies. (Ih) An opportunity to experience and reflect ana- 
lytically in writing on the diverse cultural and intellectual life of Wake Forest, with an emphasis 
on women's and gender studies events and topics. Pass /Fail only. 

m . Writing and Women's Issues. (3h) This writing-intensive seminar explores special topics that 
include women, such as: women and creativity; women, work, and family; Womanist literature; 
reproductive rights; violence against women; women and the arts; the emergence of feminist 
thought. Emphasis is on expository writing, critical thinking, and exchange of ideas in a discus- 
sion and workshop setting; frequent essays based on readings. Satisfies the basic composition 
but not the minor requirement. 

221. Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies. (3h) An interdisciplinary course, taught by 
women's and gender studies faculty representing at least two fields, that integrates materials 
from the humanities and the sciences. Topics include critical methods and practical solutions, 
history and theory of women's and gender studies, women in culture and society, and cross- 
cultural issues of gender, ethnicity, social class, disability, and sexual orientation. (CD) 

310. Gender, Power, and Violence. (3h) A research-centered study of various issues related to vio- 
lence, power, and gender in American society. Emphasis is on sociological analysis of compet- 
ing theoretical explanations of violence with respect to race, class, gender, religion, and sexual 
orientation. Also listed as SOC 375. (CD) 



252 



WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES 



321. Research Seminar in Women's and Gender Studies. (3h) A capstone, research-centered 
study of questions raised by women's and gender studies on an interdisciplinary topic, such 
as women's health issues, international women's issues, lesbian and gay culture and theory, 
women and the arts, etc. May be repeated for credit if topic differs. 

350. Biocultural Perspectives on Women and Aging. (3h) A course that examines biological, socio- 
psychological, and cultural issues affecting older women. 

358. Mothers and Daughters. (3h) A course that examines literature, psychology, and feminist 
theories on motherhood and the mother-daughter relationship. 

359. Fathers and Daughters. (3h) The ways in which fathers influence their daughters' emotion- 
al, psychological, and intellectual development. Selected materials from psychology, mythol- 
ogy, film, and contemporary literature. 

377. Special Topics. (1.5h, 2.5h, 3h) Includes such women's and gender studies topics as gender 
issues in the twenty-first century, Jewish-American women writers, African-American women 
writers, women and aging, critical approaches to women's issues, and the emergence of femi- 
nist thought. May be repeated for credit if topic differs. 

396. Independent Study. (l-3h) Independent projects in women's and gender studies which 
either continue study begun in regular courses or develop new areas of interest. A maximum of 
three hours may apply to the minor. By prearrangement. 

397. Internships in Women's and Gender Studies. (1.5h-3h) Practicum opportunities for work and 
for research in conjunction with a local women's or justice organization, such as W-S Family 
Services, NOW, NC Center for Laws Affecting Women, AIDS Care Service, etc. A maximum of 
three hours may apply to the minor. Pass /Fail only. 

In addition to the women's and gender studies courses, the following courses may be included 
in the minor. (See course descriptions under appropriate listings.) 

100. R.A.D.: Rape Aggression Defense. (Ih) Develops and enhances the options of self-defense, 
including basic physical self-defense tactics and risk reduction and avoidance, so they may 
become viable considerations for any woman who is attacked. Required readings include social 
science research on violence against women. Pass /Fail only. 

Electives for Women's and Gender Studies 

Additional elective courses may have been approved since publication of this bulletin. The 
program director maintains a complete list of aU approved elective courses. For the following 
course descriptions, see the relevant department's listings in this publication. 

Courses in the Humanities 

AES 310. Race, Class, and Gender in a Color-blind Society. (3h) 

ART 351. Women and Art. (3h) 

CLA 252. Women in Antiquity. (3h) 

ENG 340. Studies in Women and Literature. (3h) 

a. The woman writer in society 

b. Feminist critical approaches to literature 
HST 337. Gender in Early America. (3h) 

338. Gender in Modern America. (3h) 

WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES 253 



HMN 230. Women Writers in Contemporary Italy. (3h) 
265. Gender, Spirituality, and Art. (3h) 
290. Innovation and Inclusivity. (3h) 
320. Perspectives on the Middle Ages. (3h) 

a. Medieval Women 

b. Medieval Constructs of Gender, Race, and Class 
353. African and Caribbean Women Writers. (3h) 

MUS 208. Women and Music. (3h) 
REL 318. Feminist and Contemporary Interpretations of the New Testament. (3h) 

340. Men's Studies and Religion. (3h) 

345. The African- American Religious Experience. (3h) 
366. Gender and Religion. (3h) 

370. Women and Christianity. (3h) 

371. Theology and Sexual Embodiment. (3h) 
THE 290. Seminar: Women Playwrights. (3h) 

Courses in the Social and Natural Sciences 

AES 151. Race and Ethnic Diversity in America. (3h) 
ANT 332. Anthropology of Gender. (3h) 
COM 340. American Rhetorical Movements to 1900. (3h) 

341. American Rhetorical Movements since 1900. (3h) 
370. Special Topics: Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality. (3h) 

ECN 273. Economics for a Multicultural Future. (3h) 
POL 229. Women and Politics. (3h) 

252. Topics in International Politics: Gender and International Relations. (3h) 

277. Feminist Political Thought. (3h) 
PSY 265. Human Sexuality (3h) 

270Y. Topics: Women, Health, and Culture. (Ih) 

359. Psychology of Gender. (3h) 

364. Prejudice, Discrimination, Racism, and Heterosexism. (3h) 
SOC 153. Contemporary Families. (3h) 

305. Gender in Society. (3h) 

309. Sexuality and Society. (3h) 

311. Women in Professions. (3h) 

318. Social Stratification in the American South. (3h) 

337. Aging in Modern Society. (3h) 

348. Sociology of the Family. (3h) 

353. Families in Later Life. (3h) 

359. Race and Ethnic Relations. (3h) 

360. Social Inequality. (3h) 

361 . Sociology of the African- American Families. (3h) 



254 



WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES 



other Courses 

FYS 100. First Year Seminar. (3h) First year seminars are a basic requirement for graduation and 
are designed to enhance each student's academic and social integraHon into Wake Forest. They 
foster intellectual interchange, both written and oral, and encourage examination of opposing 
viewpoints through reading, writing, and debate of issues in a small group setting. Seminars 
are offered in most academic departments and programs. Contact Paul Orser, Dean's Office, for 
more information. 

LIB 100. Accessing Information in the Twenty-first Century. (Ih) This seven and a half week course 
provides a basic understanding of concepts in the research process, enabling students to iden- 
tify appropriate strategies for filling the information need. The course explores the broad array 
of information sources in various formats and disciplines, and emphasizes the organization, 
efficient retrieval, and critical evaluation of electronic and print information. Contact Rosalind 
Tedford, Z. Smith Reynolds Library, for more information. 

SPM 201. Basic Athletic Training. (3h) A study of the basic knowledge and skills in the preven- 
tion, treatment, and care of common athletic injuries. For more information, contact Greg Col- 
lins, collLnsg@wfu.edu. 

SPM 302. Advanced Athletic Training. (4h) An in-depth analysis of preventative measures, 
therapeutic modalities, and rehabilitative procedures employed in sports medicine. For more 
information, contact Greg Collins, collinsg@wfu.edu. 



OTHER COURSES 255 



Wayne Calloway School of Business and Accountancy 



Dean Jack E. Wilkerson Jr. 

Associate Deans J. Kline Harrison, Gordon E. McCray 

Assistant Dean for Student Professional Affairs Helen W. Akinc 

Assistant Dean for Student Academic Affairs Katharine S. Hoppe 

Director of Accountancy Program Lee G. Knigint 

Director of Graduate Studies Yvonne L Hinson 

Thomas H. Davis Professor of Business Limit Akinc 

F.IVl. Kirby Professor of Business Excellence Robert R. Bliss — 

Merrill Lynch Professorof Accountancy Jonathan E. Duchac 

Thomas S. Goho Professor of Finance and Associate Professor Thomas S. Goho 

Kemper Professor of Business J. Kline Harrison 

Hylton Professor of Accountancy Lee G. Knight 

Wayne Calloway Professor of Accountancy Dale R. Martin 

J. Tylee Wilson Professorof Business Ethics Donald P. Robin 

Wayne Calloway Professor of Taxation Ralph B. Tower 

PricewaterhouseCoopers Associate Professor of Accountancy George R. Aldhizer 

Benson-Pruitt Associate Professor James F. Cotter 

PricewaterhouseCoopers Faculty Fellow and Associate Professor of Accountancy Yvonne L. Hinson 

Citibank Faculty Fellow and Associate Professor William M. Marcum 

BellSouth Mobility Technology Faculty Fellow and Associate Professor Gordon E. McCray 

Cooper Family Fellow in Information Systems and Assistant Professor Bruce R. Lewis 

Research Professor Elizabeth J. Gatewood 

Professors Emeritus John S. Dunkelberg, Eddie V. Easley, Thomas C. Taylor 

Professors S. Douglas Beets, Stephen Ewing, G. Page West III, Jack E. Wilkerson Jr. 

Associate Professors Terry A. Baker, Sheri A. Bridges, Arun R Dewasthali, Pat H. Dickson, Paul E. Juras 

Assistant Professors Holly H. Brower, Michelle Steward 

Adjunct Assistant Professors , herry L. Jarrell, Julie H. Wayne 

Senior Lecturer in Business E. Clayton Hipp Jr. 

Lecturers in Business Katherine S. Hoppe, Debra R. Jessup 

Visiting Lecturer Benjamin Paz 

Instructors Helen W. Akinc, Jennifer Barksdale, Michaele M. Cook, Robert E. Fly, David A. Gilbert, 

Jennifer Hudson, Suzanne Jabbour, Emily Neese, Thomas H. Ramsey, Bren Varner 



256 



CALLOWAY SCHOOL 



Mission ' 

The mission of the Calloway School of Business and Accountancy at Wake Forest University is 
to enhance business and society through our teaching and scholarship. We value: an environ- 
ment that promotes thoughtful reflection and a high level of face-to-face interaction; intellectual 
curiosity, including a passion for the study of business; teaching excellence; challenging aca- 
demic standards; the creation and dissemination of knowledge; and honor and integrity. Our 
key learning goals are: awareness of contemporary business issues; holistic understanding of 
effective conduct of business; effective communicators; effective decision makers; effective team 
members; and honor and integrity. 

Accreditation 

The Calloway School is accredited through AACSB International's management accredita- 
tion standards as well as its accounting accreditation standards. Accounting accreditation is 
an elective extension of management accreditation. AACSB International may be contacted at 
(813) 769-6500, 777 South Harbour Island Boulevard, Suite 750, Tampa, Florida 33602 and at 
http://aacsb.edu/. Inquiries should relate only to the accreditation status of the school and not 
to general admissions information. 

AACSB International accreditation represents the highest standard of achievement for busi- 
ness schools and accounting programs, worldwide. Institutions that earn accreditation confirm 
their commitment to quality and continuous improvement through a rigorous and comprehen- 
sive peer review. AACSB kiternational accreditation is the hallmark of excellence in business 
education. 

Wake Forest University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Schools to award bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. The Com- 
mission can be contacted at (404) 679-4501, 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 
and www.sacscoc.org. hiquiries should relate only to the accreditation stahis of the institution, 
and not to general admission information. 

Programs and Majors 

The Calloway School of Business and Accountancy offers two degree programs: the four-year 
Bachelor of Science degree, with majors in accountancy, business, finance, and mathematical 
business (in cooperation with the Department of Mathematics); and the Master of Science in 
Accountancy (MSA) degree. When taken in conjunction with the Calloway School's undergrad- 
uate degrees in accountancy or finance, the MSA degree requires one additional year of shidy. 

Business. The business major in the Calloway School prepares students for success in today's 
business world with a challenging and high quality curriculum. The major is intentionally 
general and facilitates the integration of the various business disciplines with the liberal arts 
core. It also emphasizes flexibility by allowing the opportunity for specialized career paths and 
for minors outside the Calloway School. 

Finance, The finance major in the Calloway School prepares students for success in careers in 
financial services, including portfolio management, investment and commercial banking, and 
financial consulting. The major emphasizes a strong concentration in finance, supported by ac- 
counting concepts beyond the introductory level, which is critical in a global environment. 

Matliematical Business. The mathematical business major, offered by the Calloway School jointly 
with the Department of Mathematics, prepares students for careers in business and government 



CALLOVv'AY SCHOOL 



257 



that require model-based, advanced quantitative approaches to problem solving. The major 
responds to today's complex global environment, where problems in business administration 
and public policy making are becoming more intricate, requiring the use of such approaches. 

Accountancy. The Calloway School's separate accounting accreditation through AACSB Inter- 
national requires that the School establish a separate statement of mission for its accountancy 
program complementary to the School's basic mission statement provided. Accordingly, the 
mission and values of the School's accountancy program are as follows: 

The mission of the Wake Forest accountancy program is to enhance business, society, and the 
accountancy profession through our teaching and scholarship. We value: an environment that 
promotes thoughtful reflection and a high level of face-to-face interaction; intellectual curiosity, 
including a passion for the study of business; teaching excellence; challenging academic stan- 
dards consistent with high-quality students; the creation and dissemination of knowledge; honor, 
integrity, and respect for the ethical and legal foundations of the accountancy profession; and 
strong relationships with alumni, recruiters, and other members of the accountancy profession. 

The five-year accountancy program includes both the baccalaureate and master's programs, 
and requires admittance during the student's junior year. Students admitted to the five-year 
accountancy program may major in either accountancy or finance (FIN-M) at the baccalaureate 
level. During the third and fourth years, students admitted to the program take the business, 
accounting, and finance courses required for a major in accountancy or finance. The curriculum 
also provides students with the opportunity to do a professional internship during the fourth 
year. The coursework, combined with the professional internship, provides students with a 
solid foundation in the concepts, principles, and practices of accountancy and business. Stu- 
dents need this foundation for success in the MSA program and the early years of their careers. 

The curriculum for the fifth year of study adds both depth and breadth to students' imder- 
graduate foundation in accountancy and finance and prepares them for a wide variety of 
careers in accountancy and financial services (for example, auditing and assurance, taxation, 
business advisory services, forensic accounting, investment and commercial banking). The five- 
year program also qualifies students to take the CPA examination in North Carolina and most 
other jurisdictions. 

Admission 

Admission to the Calloway School is by formal application, and applicants are screened by the 
Committee on Admissions, Continuation, and Scholarships of the Wayne Calloway School of 
Business and Accountancy. Before being considered for admission to the Calloway School, the 
applicant first must have been admitted to Wake Forest College. Minimum requirements for 
admission to the Wayne Calloway School of Business and Accountancy are completion of forty- 
nine hours with an overall grade point average of 2.7, completion of ECN 150, MTH 106 or 111 
(MTH 112 or the equivalent for the mathematical business major), ACC 111 (with a minimum of 
C in each course) and one additional Calloway School course (ACC 221, BUS 201, 211, 221, 231, 
251 or 261). In addition, students should have completed BUS 100. Students who have not met 
fully the above requirements may request a one-semester provisional acceptance. 

The number of students who can be accommodated is limited. Meeting the minimum require- 
ments is not a guarantee of admission. Therefore, the Calloway School reserves the right to 
grant or deny admission or readmission to any student even though he or she meets the mini- 
mum requirements. Readmission to the Wayne Calloway School of Business and Accountancy 



258 



CALLOWAY SCHOOL 



first requires readmission to Wake Forest College, requirements for which are discussed in 
this bulletin. 

Admission to the MSA Program 

Admission to the MSA program requires Calloway students who have completed ACC 211 to 
file a formal application to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at the beginning of the 
spring semester of their third year of study. In connection with the application, students must 
submit three recommendations and official scores on the Graduate Management Admission 
Test (GMAT) to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. The accountancy faculty evalu- 
ates the applicants and makes admissions decisions on a competitive basis. (See the Graduate 
School Bulletin for more information.) 

Transfer of Credit from Other Schools 

It is expected that most work toward degrees offered by the Wayne Calloway School of Busi- 
ness and Accountancy will be taken in the CaUoway School. For students wishing to transfer 
credit from other schools towards their major, the following general guidelines apply: 

(a) All approvals for transfer credits from other institutions to the Calloway School must be: 

(1) approved prior to admission into the School for transfer students and 

(2) pre-approved before such courses are taken by non-transfer students. 

(b) Courses taken at AACSB accredited schools will be considered for transfer credit per (a) above. 
Transfer credit for all courses taken at schools not accredited by the AACSB generally requires a 
validation exam in order to be considered for transfer credit. 

(c) Study abroad transfer credit will be considered per (a) above for coursework taken through in- 
ternational programs sponsored by AACSB accredited schools or offered by select universities or 
programs approved by the Calloway faculty. Courses taken through international programs not 
meeting these qualifications will require a validation exam in order to be considered for transfer 
credit [per (a) above]. 

(d) No online courses will be considered for transfer credit from any university. 

(e) Courses passed at another school with the minimum passing grade at that school may not be 
transferred. 

(f) No work in courses numbered 200 and above will be accepted from two-year schools. 

(g) No coursework equivalent to the 300-level or higher courses at Calloivay will be accepted for 
transfer credit. 

(h) Courses taken elsewhere in subjects not offered at the Calloway School will not necessarily count 

toward the hours required in the Calloway School, 
(i) A maximum of two courses (6 hours) may be transferred after admission into the Calloway School 

(including any approved economics course counting toward the major), 
(j) Students entering the Calloway School from the College of Arts and Sciences at Wake Forest 

University must take Accountancy 111 within the Calloway School. Students transferring into the 

Calloway School from another university must take a validation examination for Accounting HI. 

For the accountancy major, a minimum of forty-two hours must be earned in the Wayne Callo- 
way School of Business and Accountancy at Wake Forest University; for the major in business, 
a minimum of thirty hours must be earned in the Calloway School; for the major in finance, the 
minimum hours earned in the Calloway School must total thirty-eight; for the FIN-M option, a 



CALLOWAY SCHOOL 259 



minimum of fifty hours must be earned in the Calloway School; and for the bachelor of science 
in mathematical business, a minimum of thirty hours must be earned in the Calloway School 
and/or mathematics department at Wake Forest University. 

Students from the College of Arts and Sciences (non-Calloway majors) wishing to transfer 
business or accounting courses taken at other institutions towards credit as general electives in 
the College may do so upon review of that course's description in the school's catalog (and in 
some cases review of the syllabus for that course). 

Requirements for Continuation 

In addition to the requirements outlined in the Procedures section of this bulletin, a student 
must be academically responsible and must show satisfactory progress toward completing the 
requirements for the degree. The administration of the Wayne Calloway School of Business and 
Accountancy notifies the student if satisfactory progress is not being made and, after consulta- 
tion with the Committee on Admission, Continuation, and Scholarships, decides if the student 
may continue as a major in the Calloway School. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The Wayne Calloway School of Business and Accountancy confers the bachelor of science 
degree with a major in accountancy, business, finance, or mathematical business. The require- 
ments for completion of the degrees are those in effect at the time the student enters the Cal- 
loway School. 

The accountancy major requires the following courses: ACC 111, 211, 212, 221, 237, 351, and 
352; BUS 100, 201, 211, 221, 231, 241, 251, 261, and 271 or 272; ECN 150; MTH 106 or 111. 

The business major requires the following courses: ACC 111 and 221; BUS 100, 201, 202, 211, 
221, 231, 241, 251, 261, and 271 or 272; ECN 150; MTH 106 or 111; and a minimum of nine hours 
from BUS 209, 212, 213, 215, 216, 217, 222, 223, 224, 225, 227, 228, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 238, 243, 
253, 262, 265, 281, 282, 290, 291, 293, 294, 338 or accounting courses numbered 200 or above (ex- 
cluding ACC 221). One elective may be taken from economics courses numbered 200 or above. 

The finance major requires the following courses: ACC HI, 211, 212, and 221; BUS 100, 201, 
211, 221, 231, 232, 238, 241, 251, 261, and 271 or 272; ECN 150; MTH 106 or 111; and a minimum 
of six hours from BUS 233, 234, 235, 236. A student may substitute three hours of an upper level 
Calloway elective for one finance elective, subject to review by the finance faculty. 

Prerequisites for the mathematical business major include the following courses: ACC 111 
and 221; MTH 112 or the equivalent; ECN 150; and BUS 100. Requirements for the mathematical 
business major are: MTH 253, 256, 301 (or 113), 302 (or 121), 353; BUS 211, 221, 231, 241, 251, 261, 
292; and a minimum of six additional hours — only three of which can be in business. Math- 
ematics electives must be at the 300 level or above, excluding 381. 

In addition to the courses stipulated, the student in business and accountancy also must 
meet the following requirements for graduation: 

(a) a minimum of 120 hours, including the basic and divisional requirements established by 
Wake Forest College; 

(b) a minimum grade point average of 2.0 on all work attempted at Wake Forest; 

(c) a minimum grade point average of 2.0 on all work attempted at other institutions; and 

(d) an overall 2.0 grade point average on all business and accountancy courses. 



260 



CALLOWAY SCHOOL 



Senior Honors Program 

Calloway School students (exclusive of mathematical business majors) with a grade point 
average of at least 3.0 on all college work and who are eligible for membership in Beta Gamma 
Sigma are invited to apply for admission to the honors program in business and accountancy. 
A project, paper, or readings, and an oral presentation or examination are required. Those who 
successfully complete the requirements specified by the School are graduated with the designa- 
tion "Honors in Accountancy," "Honors in Business," or "Honors in Finance." For additional 
information, interested students should consult a member of the faculty of the Wayne Calloway 
School of Business and Accountancy. 

Mathematical business majors with a grade point average of at least 3.0 on all college work 
and a minimum grade point average of 3.5 in the major are invited to apply for admission to 
the honors program in mathematical business. A project, paper, or readings, and an oral presen- 
tation or examination are required. Those who successfully complete the requirements specified 
by the school and the mathematics department are graduated with the designation "Honors 
in Mathematical Business." For additional information, interested students should consult a 
member of the faculty of the mathematics department or the Wayne Calloway School of Busi- 
ness and Accountancy. 

Beta Gamma Sigma, National Honor Society 

Membership in Beta Gamma Sigma is the highest national recognition a student can receive 
in an undergraduate program in accounting or business. To be eligible for membership, a 
student must rank in the upper five percent of the junior class or the upper ten percent of the 
senior class. 

Courses of Instruction 

Business (BUS) 

100. Introduction to Business Communications. (1.5h) Provides students with the basics in per- 
suasive speaking and business writing skills. Corporate or case analyses are used to explore the 
integrative nature of business. 

101S. Introduction to Business Software. (1.5h) Provides students with basic skills in business 
software. Focuses on software for presentations, spreadsheets, and databases. In addition, 
students are familiarized with databases provided through the library and through the Internet 
that facilitate their ability to do research. Does not count towards a Calloway major. 

Summer only. 

111. Professional Life Skills. (1.5h) Provides students with the basics of managing their personal 
finances and employee benefits. Focuses on topics such as: personal banking and budgeting 
fundamentals; individual credit and tax issues; employee investment and insurance options; 
and home rental or purchase considerations. Open to Calloway and non-Calloway students. 
Pass /Fail only. 

113. Foundations of Entrepreneurship. (3h) Addresses the challenges of creating and sustaining 
organizations in today's global environment. Provides an overview of the role and importance 
of entrepreneurship in the global economy and in society. Examines how individuals use 
entrepreneurial skills to craft innovative responses to societal needs. Does not count toward a 
Calloway major. Also listed as ESE 101. 

CALLOWAY SCHOOL 261 



181. Field Study. (Ih) Directed field study in specialized areas of business. Pass/Fail only 
P— BUS 100 and ACC 111, POL 

201. Quantitative Analysis I. (3h) Emphasizes the understanding and application of quantita- 
tive tools used in the business decision making process. Issues covered include collection and 
presentation of data, sampling, and inferences. P — BUS 100. 

202. Quantitative Analysis II. (3h) Emphasizes the understanding and application of quantitative 
tools for data analysis and managerial decision-making. Topics include statistical tools such as 
Chi-Square methods, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation analysis. Management 
science tools include statistical decision theory and some deterministic optimization models 
such as linear programming and its various extensions. Application of these methods to the 
analysis of decisions from various functional areas of business is an important component of 
thecourse. P— BUS201. -"'" - — 

209. Seminar: Contemporary Issues in Business. (3h) Examines current business issues using the 
theory and practices covered in the core courses. Topics may include recent global business 
events and policies, corporate takeovers and restructurings, business aspects of health care, 
workplace issues, the relationship of government and business decisions, among others. The 
topics discussed change each semester reflecting the important issues at that time. P — Senior 
status and POL 

211. Organizational Behavior. (3h) Focuses on the behavior, structure, and processes within or- 
garuzations. Emphasis is on developing knowledge and skills regarding the role of individuals 
and groups within organizations, as well as organizational dynamics. P or C — BUS 100. 

212. Human Resource Management. (3h) Focuses on important human resources management 
(HRM) skills that are frequently used by general managers. Upon completion of the course, 
students should be literate in basic HRM concepts, knowledgeable of general managers' HRM 
responsibilities, and skilled in HRM applications as prospective managers. P — BUS 211. 

213. Entrepreneurship. (3h) Exposes students to multiple facets of entrepreneurship and teaches 
about creating new ventures in a hands-on fashion. A broad range of ideas, readings, and cases 
enable students to understand the ambiguous and highly-charged environment of entrepre- 
neurship, the contribution of entrepreneurial endeavors to business and society, and the char- 
acteristics of successful new venture startups. Focuses on three areas that define successful en- 
trepreneurial pursuit of new for-profit, non-profit, and social enterprise initiatives: recognizing 
opportunity, management, and assembling resources. The completion of a team-based business 
plan for a new venture is usually required. Guest speakers present their views of entrepreneur- 
ial organizations based on real-world experiences — startup, financing, legal, transition, failure, 
etc. P— BUS 211, 221, and 231, or POL 

215. Seminar in Comparative Management. (3h) Focuses on the global issues in management. 
Emphasis is on different management philosophies and styles practiced in an international 
context. Conducted in a seminar format, the course examines the complexities involved in 
operating in different cultures and the implications which these cultural differences have on 
managing organizations and employee behavior. P — BUS 211. 

216. Leading in the Nonprofit Sector. (3h) Explores the role of nonprofit organizations (churches, 
schools, civic organizations, health clinics, etc.) and examines how to effectively lead them. 



262 



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Basic knowledge areas of responsibility in nonprofit organizations (ie, legal classifications and 
issues, recruiting and managing volunteers, community development, fimdraising, board 
development, and ethical concerns) are covered. Pertinent leadership theories and issues are 
addressed. P — Senior standing. 

217. Change Management. (3h) Focuses on the processes of change and reorganization in 
organizations. Students develop the skills and knowledge necessary to allow them to assess the 
necessity for organizational change, identify factors that facilitate or impede successful change, 
and initiate and implement change in organizations. P — BUS 211. 

221 . Principles of Marketing. (3h) Investigates the means by which firms create, maintain, and 
improve relationships with customers through the development of strong brands and effective 
marketing programs. Emphasizes the application, rather than the acquisition, of marketing 
knowledge. Explores how the four Ps — product, price, place, and promotion — can be used to 
solve problems, exploit opportunities, and meet challenges in the global marketplace. Discus- 
sions, cases, objective tests, in-class exercises and a marketing campaign project are among the 
insh-uctional methods used. P— ECN 150, BUS 100, and ACC 111, or POL 

222. Global Marketing Strategy. (3h) Builds on BUS 221 to explore strategic issues in the global 
marketplace in greater depth through intensive examination of cases from consumer and 
industrial markets; product and service businesses; and for-profit and nonprofit organizations. 
Analyzes social, cultural, economic, legal, and political factors present in the global market- 
place and their impact on planning and implementing marketing strategy. Focuses on building 
analytical and decision-making skills. Objective is to ensure students understand the key role of 
marketing strategy in achieving and maintaining competitive advantage in an ever-changing, 
increasingly complex global business environment. P — BUS 221. 

223. Selected Topics in Marketing. (3h) Identifies the most current marketing topics and practices 
in the dynamic global marketplace and covers them in detail. Focuses on the application of 
leading-edge concepts and ideas in the creation of superior marketing strategies. Seminar ap- 
proach requires active student participation in the identification, elaboration, and discussion of 
course material. P — BUS 221. 

224. Marketing Research. (3h) Introduction to fundamentals of research methodology and use 
of research information in marketing decision making. Topics include research design, data col- 
lection methods, scaling, sampling, and alternate methods of statistical data analysis. Students 
design and execute their own research projects. P — BUS 201 and 221. 

225. Consumer Behavior. (3h) Focuses on understanding the customers/consumers/buyers/ 
clients/patients/patrons without whom marketing and business caimot survive. Examines 
consumer motivations, influences, decision-making processes, and behaviors as they relate to 
the development of competitive marketing strategy. Discussions, mini-cases, in-class exercises, 
and a project are among the instructional methods used. P — BUS 221 or POL 

227. Marketing Communications. (3h) Designed for students whose career plans involve making 
strategic marketing decisions. Emphasizes ways to foster relationships with consumers by es- 
tablishing a dialogue through advertising, consumer and trade promotions, the Internet, direct 
mail, publicity, packaging, point of sale material, and event sponsorship. Discussions, cases, 
in-class exercises, oral presentations, and a marketing communications campaign project are 
among the instructional methods used. P — BUS 221. 



CALLOWAY SCHOOL 263 



228. Sports Marketing. (3h) Focuses on the application of the strategic marketing process to the 
rapidly growing sports industry. Varied elements of the industry are examined: understanding 
the sports consumer; marketing and media; advertising and communication; promotion and 
special events; licensing; and corporate sponsorships. Current research, including gender- 
specific marketing, using athletes as endorsers, segmenting the sports market, measuring value 
of sponsorship, and the impact of technology on sports are covered. P — ECN 150 or equivalent. 

231. Principles of Finance. (3h) Survey course examining the fundamentals of financial decision- 
making and including topics such as the time value of money, security valuation (corporate 
debt and equity pricing), risk and return, financial statement analysis, capital budgeting, and 
the cost of capital. Financial decision-making is developed within the context of domestic and 
international institutions and markets. P — ACC 111, P or C — ECN 150. 

232. Advanced Financial Management. (3h) Provides an in-depth examination of the complexi- 
ties of valuation and stresses practical applications of financial decision making. Topics include: 
strategic capital budgeting with managerial flexibility (real options), cost of capital determina- 
tion, firm valuation, working capital management, financial statement forecasting (pro forma 
analysis), risk analysis, and financial restructuring. Incorporates electronic spreadsheet applica- 
tions in problem solving and financial modeling. P — BUS 231 with a C or better. 

233. Investment Analysis. (3h) Equity market analysis course where students are exposed to port- 
folio development and analysis, valuation of equity securities, and selection of equity securities 
for portfolio construction. P — BUS 232 with a C or better, C — POI. 

234. International Finance. (3h) Examines the impact of international financial economics on 
markets and the management of both domestic and multinational firms. Emphasis is on insti- 
tutional and environmental factors influencing trade, foreign exchange, and capital acquisition 
and allocation. P— BUS 232 with a C or better, or POI. 

235. Fixed Income and Securitization. (3h) Fixed income markets are critical to the economy. 
These markets have been transformed by the development and widespread adoption of 
securitizations and structured products. This course provides an introduction to interest rate 
risk management, the nature of fixed income markets, the stiucture and underlying economic 
rationale for various structured products including collateralized debt obligations, and the role 
of financial engineering in fixed income markets and risk management. P — BUS 232 with a C or 
better, or POI. 

236. Financial Derivatives. (3h) Explores the pricing and uses of derivatives; the role of market 
participants; how market stiuctiires and practices facilitate risk transfer; and the uses of deriva- 
tives for hedging. Covers futures /forwards, options, and swaps, the three most important types 
of financial derivatives. P — BUS 232 with a C or better, or POI. 

238. Integrative Financial Decision Making. (2h) The capstone course for finance majors. Applies 
the skills learned in prior courses to develop a chief financial officer's view of business. Stu- 
dents analyze cases and grapple with problems and issues in the business media. P — BUS 232 
and at least one of the following: BUS 233, 234, 235, 236. (With a C or better in all listed courses.) 

241. Production and Operations Management. (3h) Introduces the basic concepts of operations 
strategy and operations planning in support of the business strategy of the firm. Topics include: 
operations strategy, quality management, project planning and control, capacity planning, loca- 
tion, layout, demand forecasting, supply chain management, aggregate planning, production 
scheduling, and inventory systems. P — BUS 201. 



264 



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243. Management of Technology and Innovation. (3h) Explores the management challenges and 
opportunities created by emerging new technologies including both product and process tech- 
nologies. Themes include (1) how pioneering firms manage the initial exploitation of new tech- 
nologies to create business value and establish a competitive advantage through new product 
development or new process development and (2) how established firms cope with an emerg- 
ing technology that threatens to diminish their competitive advantage or displace demand for 
products and services. Deals with managerial rather than technical choices. P — BUS 211, 221, 
231 and 251, or POI. 

251. Management Information Systems. (3h) Introduction to the business issues associated 
with information systems, designed to provide a broad perspective for utilizing and manag- 
ing an organization's information resources. Frameworks are presented for understanding 
the placement and relationship of different types of information systems within an organiza- 
tion. Includes an overview of computing technology currently used in business organizations, 
techniques for developing and implementing information systems, advanced applications of 
information technology, and the strategic implications of information systems and technology 
for business. P— BUS 100. 

253. Selected Topics in Information Systems. (3h) In-depth study of contemporary issues in the 
field of information systems that are not covered in other information systems courses. Content 
varies. P— BUS 251 or POI. 

261 . Legal Environment of Business. (3h) Study of the legal environment in which business 
decisions are made in profit and nonprofit organizations. Emphasis is on how the law develops 
and how economic, political, social, international, and ethical considerations influence this 
development. Includes an overview of private law topics (such as torts, contracts, and agency) 
and public regulation of the employment relationship, the competitive marketplace, and the 
environment. P or C — ACC 111. 

262. Business Law. (3h) A study of substantive law topics applicable to business transactions 
including contracts, agency, property, the UCC, and business organizations with an emphasis 
on how these subjects intersect with the functional areas of business and affect managerial 
decision making. P — BUS 261. 

265. Ethics and Business Leadership. (3h) An interdisciplinary exploration of ethics applied to 
business. Lectures, readings, and a case-based approach introduce the necessary background 
information. Examples of ethical and unethical situations are used to develop an understanding 
of how an efficient and effective business can also be ethical. (One-half of enrollment spaces are 
available for non-Calloway School students.) P — Junior or senior standing. 

271. Strategic Management. (3h) Focuses on the derivation of competitive advantage by organi- 
zations. Emphasizes the activities of general managers who are responsible for the shape, char- 
acter, and overall direction of the total enterprise. Course content includes analyzing the effects 
of industry and competitive environments on the firm, determining the strategic basis upon 
which the firm should compete, formulating and implementing integrative action plans which 
enhance performance, and strategic leadership. Principles of competitive analysis and strategic 
planning are applied to case studies of domestic situations, diversification, globalization, and 
corporate turnaround. P— BUS 211, 221, and 231. P or C— BUS 241. 



CALLOWAY SCHOOL 



265 



272. Strategic Management in Entrepreneurial Firms. (3h) Core fovindational concepts in strategic 
management are critically examined in the context of entrepreneurial firm settings. Emphasis 
is on applying principles of competitive analysis and strategic planning using case studies of 
startups, fast-growth firms, young firms in rapidly-changing industries, and firms confronting 
early organizational life cycle problems. Unique strategy issues confronted by firms in elec- 
tronic commerce, technology, and other fast-paced industries are considered. P — BUS 211, 221, 
and 231. P or C— BUS 241. 

281. Individualized Reading and Research. (Ih, 2h, 3h) Directed study in specialized areas of 
business. P — POI. 

282. Management in the Visual Arts. (3h) Taught by faculty from the Calloway School and the 
art department. Provides both art and business students with the essential skills, pragmatic 
experiences, and a conceptual framework for understanding the role the visual arts play within 
the national and international economies. Students receive preparation for involvement in art 
galleries, auction houses, museums, and publishing, as well as for contributions to various 
boards and organizations that commission or purchase works of art. The marketing, financial, 
legal, and strategic aspects of art management are explored. Emphasis is on dialogue between 
art majors and business majors enrolled in the course. Field study in at least one major metro- 
politan area for the purpose of gaining intensive exposure to professional arts management is 
required, but the majority of travel costs are covered by the University. Also listed as ART 297. 
(One half of enrollment spaces are available for students who have been accepted into the Cal- 
loway School; the remaining half of the spaces are available to declared art majors with junior 
standing or higher.) P — ^Junior or senior standing and POI. 

290. International Business Study Tour. (3h) An experiential learning course which provides stu- 
dents with an exposure to and understanding of global operations in foreign settings. Each of 
the functional areas of business (marketing, operations, finance, human resources management, 
information systems, and strategic management) are covered through various site visits and 
presentations in selected foreign countries. Background readings and assignments appropriate 
to business or finance majors are required. Taught overseas in the summer. P — POI. 

292. Seminar in Mathematical Business Analysis. (3h) Provides mathematical business majors 
with a forum where they can actually see how the mathematical, statistical and computer 
techniques can be brought to bear on many business problems in a variety of business func- 
tions. Emphasis is more on studying the process of modeling and implementation issues of the 
solutions and less on the algorithmic details. Critical and reflective thinking about models and 
the tianslation of results into management action is a major objective. Another objective of the 
seminar is to foster group work and the sharpening of presentation skills. P — BUS 211, 221, 231, 
241, and MTH 256, 353. 

293. Principles of Risk Management. (1.5h) Intended to assist students in identifying and analyz- 
ing risk and in managing it through a variety of mechanisms. Techniques such as loss control, 
risk retention, and risk transfer are discussed. P — ^Junior or senior standing. 

294. Applied Risk Management. (1.5h) Professional risk management field work, under the direc- 
tion of a faculty member. Students gain relevant practical experience that is integrated with 
casework and risk management theory. Emphasis is on analysis, decision-making in a global 
environment, teamwork, written and verbal skills, presentation skills, and using technology to 
solve problems. P — BUS 293, POI, and senior standing. 



266 



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295. Summer Management Program. (6h) A study of the various functions of business including 
accounting, finance, information systems, management, marketing, production, and strategic 
planning. Special application and admission procedures. Students may not receive credit for 
both BUS 295 and BUS 297S. Offered only in the summer and open only to junior and senior liberal 
arts majors. Pass /Fail only. 

296. Seminar in Fundamentals of Business. (4.5h) Study of the various functional areas of 
business, including finance, information systems, management, marketing, production, and 
strategic planning. P — Admission to master of science in accountancy program. Pass /Fail only. 
Offered only in the summer. 

297S. SportsCOM. (6h) Study of the concepts, operations, and management associated v^ith the 
sports industry. Students are introduced to such areas as the foundation of sports management, 
sociology of sports, sports marketing, psychology of coaching, sports economics and finance, 
ethics in management of sports organizations, legal issues in sports management, athletics 
administration, facilities management, and the strategic management of sports organizations. 
Students may not receive credit for both BUS 295 and BUS 297S. Special application and admis- 
sion procedures. This course does not count toward a Callovv^ay major. Enrollment is not limited 
to Calloway students. One-half of enrollment spaces are available for student athletes and one- 
half for non-student athletes with sport experience. Pass /Fail only. Offered only in the summer 
with preference to rising seniors. 

338. Financial Statement Analysis. (1.5h) Study of the techniques used to analyze and interpret 
the information in corporate financial statements. Emphasis is on (1) accounting methods used 
in the preparation of financial statements, (2) implications of management's accoimting choices 
for evaluation of corporate performance by creditors and investors, and (3) linkages among 
financial statement items. P— BUS 231 and ACC 212. 

Accountancy (ACC) 

1 1 1. Introductory Financial Accounting. (3h) Introduction to financial accounting and reporting, 
including the role of financial information in business decisions, the basic financial statements, 
and the processes used to prepare these financial statements. Students are introduced to the 
accounting and reporting issues associated with an organization's financing, investing, and 
operating activities. Sophomore standing. 

21 1 . Financial Accounting Theory and Problems I. (4h) Study of the conceptual framework un- 
derlying financial accounting in the U.S. as well as the financial accounting standards setting 
process and the basic corporate financial statements. Financial accounting and reporting issues 
associated with receivables, inventories, property, plant, equipment, and intangible assets are 
also examined. P — BUS 100 and minimum of C in ACC 111. 

21 2. Financial Accounting Theory and Problems II. (4h) Examination of financial accounting and 
reporting issues associated with current liabilities and contingencies, long-term liabilities, 
stockholders' equity, dilutive securities and earnings per share, income taxes, pensions, 
postietirement benefits, leases, financial statement errors, and the statement of cash flows. 
P— Minimum of C in ACC 211. 



CALLOWAY SCHOOL 267 



221 . Introductory Management Accounting. (3h) Study of the concepts fundamental to manage- 
ment accounting which aid in decision making, performance evaluation, and planning and 
control. Topics covered include product costing systems, budgeting, differential and break- 
even analysis, responsibility accounting, cost allocation, and management accounting reports. 
P — Minimum of C in ACC 111. 

237. Taxes and Their Role in Business and Personal Decisions. (3h) Review of legal and accounting 
concepts associated with the federal taxation of income. Topics examined include the regular 
and alternative minimum tax models as well as gross income, capital gains, property transac- 
tions, deductions, and credits. P or C — ACC 211 or POI. 

290. International Accounting. (3h) Experiential learning course that provides students with an 
opportunity to learn about international and transnational accounting standards, policies, and 
practices. Students participate in a study tour of several selected countries and gain an interna- 
tional accounting and business perspective through meetings with individuals in government, 
professional accounting firms, financial institutions, and manufacturing companies. Back- 
ground readings and assignments appropriate to accounting or finance majors are required. 
Taught overseas in the summer. P — ACC 211 and POI. 

291. Professional Accounting Internship. (6h) Professional accounting field work, under the 
direction of a faculty member, in a public accounting firm, corporate enterprise, or not-for-profit 
organization. Students gain relevant practical experience which builds on prior coursework and 
provides an experiential knowledge base for coursework in the fifth year. Pass /Fail. P — Admis- 
sion to MSA program and POI. 

351. Accounting Information Systems. (3h) Study of the design and operation of accounting 
systems including the revenue, expenditure, and administrative transaction cycles. Emphasis 
is on the necessary controls for reliable data. P — Admission to MSA program, minimum of C in 
ACC 211 and BUS 251. 

352. Introduction to Auditing. (4h) Examination of basic auditing concepts and practices, and the 
auditor's professional responsibilities. Emphasis is on auditing standards and the auditing pro- 
cedures commonly used in public accounting. P — Admission to the MSA program, minimum 
of C in ACC 211; C— ACC 351 or POI. 

378. Individualized Reading and Research. (Ih, 2h, 3h) Directed study in specialized areas of 
accountancy. P — POI. 



268 



CALLOWAY SCHOOL 



The Undergraduate Faculties 



Date following name indicates year of appointment. Listings represent those faculty teaching either full or part-time 
during the fall 2006 and/or spring 2007. Leaves and teaching abroad assignments approved for fall 2007/spring 2008 
are provided for the benefit of students, faculty, and staff and are subject to change. 



Instructor in Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 



Thomas H. Davis Chair of Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 



Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 
Associate Professor of Romance Languages 



Helen W. Akinc (1987) 
BA, UNC-Chapel Hill; 
MBA, SUNY (Binghamton) 

Umit Akinc (1982) 

BS, Middle East Tech. (Ankara); 

MBA, Florida State; PhD, UNC-Chapel HUl 

Irma V. Alarcron (2005) 

BA, Universidad de Concepcion (Chile); MA, PhD, Indiana 

Jane W. Albrecht (1987) 

BA, Wright State; MA, PhD, Indiana 

George R. Aldhizer HI (2001) PricewaterhouseCoopers Associate Professor 

BS, BA, Richmond; for Academic Excellence 

PhD, Texas Tech (W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Rebecca W. Alexander (2000) Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

BS, University of Delaware; PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

Brian Allen (1977) 

BA, East Anglia; MA, PhD, London 

Edward E. Allen (1991) 

BS, Brigham Young; MA, PhD, California (San Diego) 

David J. Anderson (1992) 

BA, Denison; MS, Michigan; PhD, Pennsylvania 

John P. Anderson (1984) 

BS, MS, PhD, Georgia Tech; MBA, Alabama (Birmingham); MAEd, Wiake Forest 

Paul R. Anderson (1990) 

BS, Wisconsin (Madison); MA, PhD, California (Santa Barbara) 

Sharon Andrews (1994) Zachary T. Smith Associate Professor of Theatre 

BA, UNC-Chapel Hill; MFA, UNC-Greensboro (Leave, spring 2008) 

John L. Andronica (1969) Professor of Classical Languages 

BA, Holy Cross; MA, Boston College; 
PhD, Johns Hopkins 

Maya Angelou (1982) Reynolds Professor of American Studies 

LittD, Smith, Lawrence, Columbia College (Chicago), 
Atlanta, Wheaton; LHD, Mills, Wake Forest, Occidental, 
Arkansas, Claremont, Kean 

Elizabeth S. Anker (2006) Assistant Professor of English 

BA, Hope College; JD, Chicago; ABD, Virginia 

Elizabeth M. Anthony (1998) Lecturer in Romance Languages 

BA, Duke; MA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

John Paul Antonelli (2006) Adjunct Instructor in Music 

BS, NC State; BM, NC School of the Arts 



Lecturer in Art History (London) 
(Department of Art, Part-time) 

Professor of Mathematics 



Professor of Biology 

Professor of Counseling 

Professor of Physics 



269 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



Victor Apanius (2006) 

BS, Wisconsin; PhD, Pennsylvania 

Johnne Armentrout (1989) 

BA, William and Mary; MAEd, Wake Forest 

Miriam A. Ashley-Ross (1997) 

BS, Northern Arizona; PhD, California (Irvine) 

Jorge Aviles-Diz (2004) 

BA, MA, Universidad de Salamanca, Spain 

R. Scott Baker (2001) 

BA, Evergreen State College; MA, Tufts; PhD, Columbia 

Terry A. Baker (1998) Pricev^^aterhouseCoopers Associate Professor of Accountancy 



Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biology 

Adjunct Instructor in Counseling 

Associate Professor of Biology 

Instructor in Romance Languages 



Associate Professor of Education 



BA, Miami; MS, Illinois; MBA, Chicago; 
PhD, Kentucky 

Wanda Balzano (2005) 

BA, MA, University of Naples, Italy; — 
MA, PhD, University College, Dublin 

Sarah E. Barbour (1985) 

BA, MaryviUe; Diplome de Langue et 

de Civilisation Fran^aises, Paris; MA, PhD, Cornell 

Adrian Bardon (2002) 

BA, Reed College; MA, University of Washington; 
PhD, Massachusetts (Amherst) 

James P Barefield (1963) 

BA, MA, Rice; PhD, Johns Hopkins 

Jennifer C. Barksdale (2006) 
BS, Wake Forest 



(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Director of Women's and Gender Studies and 
Adjunct Assistant Professor of English 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages 



Assistant Professor of Philosophy 



Wake Forest Professor Emeritus of History 



Instructor in Accountancy 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Bemadine Barnes (1989) Associate Professor of Art 

BA, Illinois (Urbana-Champaign); MA, Pittsburgh; PhD, Virginia 

Elizabeth Barron (2005) Visiting Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

BA, Wake Forest; PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Phillip G. Batten (1991) Adjtmct Assistant Professor of Psychology 

BA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill; MA, Yale; MA, Wake Forest 

Karina Bautista (2005) 

BA, SUNY (Cortland); MA, Syracuse 

Alessandra Beasley (2006) 

BA, Arizona State; MA, PhD, Pittsburgh 

H. Kenneth Bechtel (1981) 

BA, MA, North Dakota; PhD, Southern Illinois (Carbondale) 

Robert C. Beck (1959) 
BA, PhD, Illinois 

S. Douglas Beets (1987) 
BS, Termessee; 
MAcc, PhD, Virginia Poly Inst. & SU 

Margaret C. Bender (2000) 

BA, Cornell; MA, PhD, Chicago 

Justin Bennett (2004) Instructor in Romance Languages 

BA, MA, Miami 



Instructor in Romance Languages 

Instructor in Communications 

Associate Professor of Sociology 

Professor of Psychology 



Professor of Accountancy 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Fellow 
and Associate Professor of Anthropology 



Michael Bennett (2006) 

AB, MA, John Carroll; JD, Case Western Reserve; PhD, Saint Louis 



Visiting Assistant Professor of History 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



270 



Kristin Redington Bennett (2005) 

BA, Florida; MAEd, Wake Forest; PhD, UNC-Greensboro 

Paige Bentley (2006) 

BA, MAEd, Wake Forest; ABD, UNC-Greensboro 



Visiting Assistant Professor of Education 
Adjunct Instructor in Counseling 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 



Kenneth S. Berenhaut (2000) 

BA, MS, University of Manitoba (Canada); MA, PhD, Georgia 

Michael J. Berry (1985) Professor of Health and Exercise Science 

BS, Jacksonville State; MA, Southeastern Louisiana; PhD, Texas A&M 

Deborah L. Best (1972, 1978) William L. Poteat Professor of Psychology 

BA, MA, Wake Forest; PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Zarma Beswick (1987) Lecturer in Theatre (London) 

BA, Hons, Bristol (England) 

Ulrich Bierbach (1999) Associate Professor of Chemistry 

MS, PhD, University of Oldenburg (Germany) 

Jaruce Blackburn (1996) Instructor in Mathematics 

BS, Campbell; MA, Wake Forest 

Robert R. Bliss (2004) 

BS, Purdue; MBA, PhD, Chicago 

Terry D. Blumenthal (1987) 

BS, Alberta (Edmonton); MS, PhD, Florida 

Ronald Bobroff (2001) 

BA, Pennsylvania; MSc, London School of Economics; MA, PhD, Duke 

Sylvain H. Boko (1997) Zachary T. Smith Associate Professor of Economics 

BA, Grinnell; PhD, Iowa State 

Professor of Physics 



F.M. Kirby Chair of Business Excellence 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Professor of Psychology 
Lecturer in History 



Keith D. Bonin (1992) 

BS, Loyola; PhD, Maryland 

Lynn Book (2005) 

BFA, Memphis College; MFA, School of the Art Institute of Chicago 

Susan Harden Borwick (1982) 

BM, BME, Baylor; PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Janet Boseovski (2004) 

BSc, Uruversity of Toronto; MA, McGill; PhD, Queen's 

John D. Bourland (1996) 

BS, MS, PhD, UNC-Chapel HUl 

C. Kevin Bowen (1994) 

BS, Tennessee Tech; MM, Louisville; PhD, Florida State 

Rian E. Bowie (2006) 

BA, Tougaloo College; MA, Temple 

Eric E. Bowne (2006) 
BA, PhD, Georgia 

Stephen B. Boyd (1985) 

BA, Tennessee; MDiv, ThD, Harvard Divinity School 

Anne Boyle (1986) 

BA, Wilkes College; MA, PhD, Rochester 

R. Saylor Breckenridge (2001) 
BA, MA, PhD, Arizona 



Visiting Associate Professor of Theatre 

Professor of Music 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Adjunct Associate Professor of Physics 

Director of Bands 
(Department of Music) 

Visiting Instructor in English 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

Easley Professor of Religion 

Professor of English 
(Leave, 2007-08) 



Sheri A. Bridges (1996) 
BA, South Florida; 
MA, Texas (Dallas); PhD, Stanford 



Assistant Professor of Sociology 
Qapan, fall 2007) 

Associate Professor of Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 



271 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



Thomas Brister (2005) 

BS, Georgetown; MA, PhD, Virginia 

Holly Henderson Brower (2005) 

BS, Wake Forest; MS, Iowa State; PhD, Purdue 

Michaelle L. Browers (2000) 

BA, Whitman; MA, Virginia; PhD, Minnesota 

Bernard A. Brown II (2002) 
BS, PhD, NC State 

Carole L. Browne (1980) 

BS, Hartford; PhD, Syracuse 

Robert A. Browne (1980) 

BS, MS, Dayton; PhD, Syracuse 

Peter H. Brubaker (1994) 

BS, E. Stroudsburg; MA, Wake Forest; PhD, Temple 

Peter Bnmette (2004) 

BA, MA, Duquesne; PhD, Wisconsin (Madison) 

Christy M. Buchanan (1992) 

BA, Seattle Pacific; PhD, Michigan 

Karen Buchmueller (2005) 

BA, The College of Wooster; PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Jennifer J. Burg (1993) 

BA, Elizabethtown College; MA (English), 
MA (French), Florida; PhD, Central Florida 

M. Keith Callahan (2004) 

BS, Morehead State; MS, Auburn 

Alan Cameron (1989) 

BA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill; MAEd, Wake Forest 

Daniel A. Cafias (1987) 

BS, Tecnologico de Monterrey (Mexico); 
MS, Georgia Tech; PhD, Texas (Austin) 

Eric D. Carlson (1995) 

BS, Michigan State; MA, PhD, Harvard 

Richard D. Carmichael (1971) 

BS, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, Duke 

Nicholas L. Camagey (2006) 
BS, MS, ABD, Iowa State 



Christa G. Carollo (1985) 

BA, UNC-Greensboro; MA, Duke 

Simone M. Caron (1991) 

BA, Bridgewater State; MA, Northeastern; PhD, Clark 

Bonnie Carr (2004) 

BA, Hamilton College; MA, PhD, Washington 

Jacqui Carrasco (1999) 

BA, California (Los Angeles); MM, DMA, SUNY (Stony Brook) 

David Carroll (2003) 

BSc, NC State; PhD, Wesleyan 

A. Roymieco Carter (2006) 

BFA, Virginia Commonwealth; MFA, Perm State 



Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science 

Assistant Professor of Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Professor of Biology 

Professor of Biology 

Professor of Health and Exercise Science 

Reynolds Professor of Film Studies 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor of Computer Science 

Professor of Military Science 
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Education 
Associate Professor of Computer Science 

Associate Professor of Physics 

Professor of Mathematics 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Adjunct Senior Lecturer in German 

Associate Professor of History 

Visiting Assistant Professor of English 



Associate Professor of Music 



Associate Professor of Physics 



Assistant Professor of Art 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



272 



Stewart Carter (1982) • Professor of Music 

ME, Kansas; MS, Illinois; PhD, Stanford (Vienna, spring 2008) 

Vera C. Castro (2006) Visiting Assistant Professor in Romance Languages 

BA, Federal University of Mias Gerais, Brazil; 
MA, New Mexico 

Justin Catanoso (1993) Lecturer in Journalism 

BA, Pennsylvania State; MA, Wake Forest (Department of English) 

Latifa Chahoua (2004) Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

BS, University of Marat (Morocco); 
MS, PhD, Paul Sabatier University (France) 

Forrest Chamock (2005) Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics 

BS, Furman; PhD, Wake Forest 

Frederick H. Chen (2000) Assistant Professor of Economics 

BS, Wisconsin (Madison); MA, PhD, Chicago 

Connie Lee Chesner (2001) Adjunct Instructor in Conununication 

BA, Appalachian State; MA, Wake Forest 

Maria A. Chiari (1981) Lecturer in Art History (Venice) 

Arts degree, PhD, Universita degli 

Studi di Venezia (Padova e Trieste); Diploma, Scuola di Archivistica, 
PaUografia e Diplomatica dell'Archivio di Stato di Venezia 

Hanya Chrispeels (2004) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biology 

BA, California (Santa Cruz); PhD, Stanford 

Jonathan H. Christman (1983) Associate Professor of Theatre 

AB, Franklin and Marshall; MFA, Massachusetts 

David Coates (1999) Worrell Professor of Anglo-American Studies 

BA, York; PhD, Oxford 

John E. Collins (1970) Professor of Religion 

BS, MS, Tennessee; MDiv, Southeastern Baptist Theo. Seminary; 
MA, PhD, Princeton 

Ray Collins (2004) Adjunct Instructor in Theatre 

Diploma, London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art; 
MFA, City University of New York 

Christa L. Colyer (2004) Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Fellow and 

BSc, Trent University (Canada); Associate Professor of Chemistry 

MSc, University of Guelph (Canada); PhD, Queen's University (Canada) 

William E. Conner (1988) Professor of Biology 

BA, Notre Dame; MS, PhD, Cornell 

Jule M. Connolly (1985) Instructor in Mathematics 

BA, UNC-Chapel Hill; MEd, South Carolina 

Sally Connolly (2006) Visiting Instructor in English 

BA, MA, Uiuversit^' College, London 

Gregory Cook (1999) Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Fellow and 

BS, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill Associate Professor of Physics 

Michaele M. Cook (2000) Instructor in Business 

BA, Wake Forest; (W. Calloway School of Business and Accovmtancy) 

MBA, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Fanchon Cordell (1986) Adjunct Instructor in Dance (Ballet, Part-time) 

Corrado Corradini (2006) • Instructor in Romance Languages 

Laurea Universita di Pisa, Italy; PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 



273 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



Benson-Pruit Associate Professor of Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Professor of Economics 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics 



James F. Cotter (2001) 

BSCE, New Mexico State; 

MBA, Indiana; PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Allin F. Cottrell (1989) 

BA, Oxford (Merton College); PhD, Edinburgh 

Carla D. Cotwright (2006) 

BS, California State (Long Beach); 

MS, Southern University and A&M College; MS, ABD, Mississippi 

Earl P. Crow Adjunct Assistant Professor of Religion 

BA, BD, Duke; PhD, The University of Manchester, UK 

Ann C. Cunningham (1999) Associate Professor of Education 

BA, Erskine College; MAT, PhD, South Carolina 

Patricia M. Cunningham (1978) Francis P. Gaines Professor of Education 

BA, Rhode Island; MS, Florida State; EdS, Indiana State; PhD, Georgia 

James F. Curran (1988) 

BAAS, Delaware; MA, PhD, Rice 

Jane Kathleen Curry (1998) 

BFA, Illinois (Urbana-Champaign); MA, Brown; 
PhD, City University of New York 

Dale Dagenbach (1990) 

BA, New College; MA, PhD, Michigan State 

Jonathan Daigle (2006) 

BA, College of William and Mary; MA, Wisconsin (Madison) 

Mary M. Dalton (1986) Assistant Professor of Commurucation 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, UNC-Greensboro 

Robin L. Daniel Adjunct Assistant Professor of Counseling 

BA, St. Andrews Presbyterian College; EdS, MS, PhD, UNC-Greensboro 



Professor of Biology 
Associate Professor of Theatre 

Professor of Psychology 
Visiting Instructor in English 



Brook M. Davis (1997) 

BA, Wake Forest; MFA, Virginia Commonwealth; 
PhD, Maryland (College Park) 

David A. Davis (2006) 

AA, Oxford College of Emory University; 

BA, Emory College; MA, ABD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Stephen W Davis (1991) 
BA, MA, Wake Forest 

Edward Dawley (2005) 

BS, Georgetown; MA, Howard 

Bama Deal (2006) 

BA, MM, ABD, Florida State 

Mary K. DeShazer (1982, 1987) 

BA, Western Kentucky; MA, LouisviUe; PhD, Oregon 

Arun P Dewasthali (1975) 

BS, Bombay; MS, PhD, Delaware 

Pat H. Dickson (2006) 

BS, MS, Mississippi College; 
PhD, Alabama (Tuscaloosa) 

Lawrence Dillon (2006) 

BM, The Hartt School of Music; MM, PhD, Juilliard School 



Assistant Professor of Theatre 

Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

Adjunct Instructor in Psychology 

Instructor in Romance Languages 

Adjunct Instructor in Music 

Professor of English and 
Women's and Gender Studies 

Associate Professor of Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Associate Professor of Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 274 



Associate Professor of Political Science 

Thurman D. Kitchin Professor of Biology 
(London, fall 2007) 

Senior Lecturer in Music 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Merrill Lynch Professor of Accountancy 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Adjunct Instructor in Communication 



JohnJ. Dinan(2001) 
BS, MA, PhD, Virginia 

Ronald V. Dimock Jr. (1970) 

BA, New Hampshire; MS, Florida State; 
PhD, California (Santa Barbara) 

Patricia Dixon (1986) 

BM, NC School of the Arts; MM, UNC-Greensboro 

Christopher Dometrius (2003) 

BA, Texas Tech; MA, PhD, NC State 

Jonathan E. Duchac (1993) 

BBA, MAcc, Wisconsin (Madison); PhD, Georgia 

Terry Dumansky (2005) 

BA, Towson; MA, Wake Forest 

Yomi Ehirotoye (1994) Senior Lecturer in Political Science and Intemahonal Studies 

BS, University of Ibadan; 
MA, Georgia State; PhD, Duke 

C. Drew Edwards (1980) Adjimct Associate Professor of Psychology 

BA, Furman; MA, Wake Forest; PhD, Florida State) 

Bryan Ellis (2006) 

BFA, UNC-Greensboro; MFA, Cranbrook Academy of Art 

Gerald W. Esch (1965) 

BS, Colorado College; MS, PhD, Oklahoma 

Paul D. Escott (1988) 

BA, Harvard; MA, PhD, Duke 

Andrew V. Ettin (1977) 

BA, Rutgers; MA, PhD, Washington (St. Louis) 

Herman E. Eure (1974) 

BS, Maryland State; PhD, Wake Forest 

Elizabeth K Evans (2006) 

BA, University of Puget Sound; MA, PhD, Wisconsin (Madison) 

Robert H. Evans (1983) 

BA, Ohio Wesleyan; MS, New Hampshire; PhD, Colorado 

Margaret Ewalt (2001) Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

BA, Colby College; MA, PhD, Virginia 

Stephen Ewing (1971) Professor of Business 

BS, Howard Payne; (W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

MBA, Baylor; PhD, Texas Tech 

David L. Faber (1984) Professor of Art 

AA, Elgin; BFA, Northern Illinois; MFA, Southern Illinois 

Susan Fahrbach (2003) . Reynolds Professor of Biology 

BA, Pennsylvania; PhD, Rockefeller 

Susan L. Faust (1992) Adjunct Instructor in Communication 

BA, MA, Arkansas (Fayetteville) (Part-time) 

Jacquelyn S. Fetrow (2003) Reynolds Professor of Computational Biophysics 

BS, Albright CoUege; 
PhD, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine 

David Finn (1988, 1995) Associate Professor of Art 

BS, Cornell; MFA, Massachusetts College of Art (London, spring 2008) 



Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art 

Charles M. Allen Professor of Biology 

Reynolds Professor of History 

Professor of English 
(Leave, faU 2007) 

Professor of Biology 

Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

Professor of Education 



275 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



Devon Fisher (2005) 

BA, Milligan College; MA, Tennessee; 

Patricia Fisk-Moody (2006) 

BA, Ambassador; MA, PhD, Appalachian State 

Gloria Fitzgibbon (2001) 

BA, PhD, California (Berkeley); MA, California State (San Francisco) 



Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Education 

Leturer in History 



William W. Fleeson (1996) 

BA, Wisconsin; PhD, Michigan 

Robert E. Fly (2003) 

BBA, Texas Tech; MA, Michigan State 

Steven Folmar (1992) 

BA, MA, PhD, Case Western Reserve 

James L. Ford (1998) 

MTS, Vanderbilt; MA, PhD, Princeton 



Mary F Foskett (1997) 

BA, New York; MDiv, Union Theo. Seminary; PhD, Emory 

Johnnie Foye (1995) 

BA, Virginia Union; MSS, US Sports Academy 

Dean Franco (2001) 

BA, California (Irvine); MA, CaUfomia State; PhD, Southern California 

Donald E. Frey (1972) 

BA, Wesleyan; MDiv, Yale; PhD, Princeton 

John E. R. Friedenberg (1988) 

BA, Wake Forest; MFA, Carnegie Mellon 

Mary L. Friedman (1987) 

BA, Wellesley; MA, PhD, Columbia 



Ollen R. Nalley Associate Professor of Psychology 

Instructor in Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Lecturer in Anthropology 

Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Fellow and 
Associate Professor of Religion 

Associate Professor of Religion 



Instructor in Health and Exercise Science 



Assistant Professor of English 



Professor of Economics 



Director of University Theatre and Lecturer in Theatre 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

Assistant Professor of Computer Science 



Errin W. Fulp (2000) 
BS, MS, PhD, NC State 

J. Michael Fulton ( 2004) 

BA, Washington State; MA, PhD, Arizona 

Pete Furia (2002) 

BA, Haverford; PhD, Princeton 

Ola Furmanek (1999) 

BA, MA, JagieUo University, Cracow, Poland; 
PhD, Nebraska (Lincoln) 

R. Michael Furr (2004) 
BA, William and Mary; 
MS, Villanova; PhD, California (Riverside) 

Candelas S. Gala (1978) 

BA, Salamanca (Spain); MA, PhD, Pittsburgh 

Joy M. Gambill (2006) 

BA, East Carolina; MDiv, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
MA, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Celia Garzon-Arrabal (2004) Instructor in Romance Languages 

BA, University of Granada (Spain); MA, UNC-Chapel Hill (Salamanca, spring 2008) 

Elizabeth J. Gatewood (2004) Research Professor 

BS, Purdue; MBA, PhD, Georgia (W Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Cynthia M. Gendrich (1998) Junior Faculty Fellow and Associate Professor of Theatre 

BFA, Illinois Wesleyan; MA, PhD, Missouri 



Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 
(Leave, faU 2007) 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 



Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Charles E. Taylor Professor of Romance Languages 
Adjunct Instructor in Library Science 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



276 



Jennifer Gentry (2003) 

BFA, Carnegie Mellon; BA, Wake Forest; MA, Johns Hopkins 

J. Whitfield Gibbons (1971) 

BS, MA, Alabama; PhD, Michigan State 

Bryan Giemza (2005) 

BA, Notre Dame; JD, MA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 



Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art 

Research Professor of Biology 

Visiting Assistant Professor of English 



David A. Gilbert (2003) 

BS, MEd, Valdosta State College; 
MBA, Tennessee (Knoxville) 

Steven M. Giles (1998) 



Instructor in Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 



Assistant Professor of Communication 



BA, Northern Kentucky; MA, Bowling Green State; PhD, Kentucky 



Michele K. GiUespie (1999) 
BA, Rice; PhD, Princeton 



Shannon D. Gilreath (2005) 

BA, Lenoir-Rhyne College; JD, Wake Forest 

Samuel T. Gladding (1990) 

BA, MAEd, Wake Forest; MA, Yale; PhD, UNC-Greensboro 

Stavroula Glezakos (2004) 

BA, PhD, California (Los Angeles) 

Thomas S. Goho (1977) 
BS, MBA, Perm State; 
PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Louis R. Goldstein (1979) 



Kahle Associate Professor of History 
Adjunct Professor of Women's and Gender Studies 
Professor of Counseling 



Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
(Leave, faU 2007) 

Thomas S. Goho Chair of Finance and 

Associate Professor of Business 

(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Professor of Music 



BM, Oberlin; MFA, California Inst, of the Arts; DMA, Eastman 

Luis Gonzalez (1997) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

BA, U de Medellin (Colombia); MA, West Virginia; PhD, California-Davis 



Brian L. Gorelick (1984) 

BA, Yale; MM, Wisconsin (Madison); DMA, Illinois 

George Graham (2003) 

BA, Fordham; MA, Western Ontario; PhD, Brandeis 

Melissa Painter Greene (2006) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Anders Greenspan (2006) 

BA, Brandeis; MA, PhD, Indiana 

Vona Groarke (2005) 

M.Lit, Trinity College, Dublin 

Martin Guthold (2001) 

BS, University Ulm, Germany; MA, PhD, Oregon 

Renee Gutierrez (2003) 
BA, MS, MA, Virginia 

David Hagy (1995) 

BM, hidiana; MM, MMA, DMA, Yale 

Ashleigh D. Haire (2005) 

BA, MA, ABD, UNC-Greensboro 

Leigh Ann HaUberg (2001) 

BA, Mount Union College; MFA, Colorado 

William S. Hamilton (1983) 
BA, MA, PhD, Yale 



Associate Professor of Music 
and Director of Choral Ensembles 

A.C. Reid Professor of Philosophy 

Adjunct Instructor in Commimication 

Visiting Assistant Professor of History 

Visiting Poet-in-Residence (English) 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

Iristructor in Romance Languages 

Director of Orchestra 
(Department of Music) 

Visiting Instructor in Psychology 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Art 

Professor of Russian 



277 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



Claire Holton Hammond (1978) 

BA, Mary Washington; PhD, Virginia 

J. Daniel Hammond (1978) 

BA, Wake Forest; PhD, Virginia 

Beverlye H. Hancock (1996) 

AB, Meredith; MA, Wake Forest 

James S. Hans (1982) 

BA, MA, Southern Illinois; PhD, Washington 

Anne E. Hardcastle (2002) 

BA, Texas A&M; MA, PhD, Virginia 

Hannah M. Hardgrave (1985) 

AB, Brown; PhD, University of Chicago 

Catherine E. Hamois (2006) 

BA, Connecticut; MA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

KatyJ. Harriger(1985) 

BA, Edinboro State; MA, PhD, Connecticut 

Catherine T. Harris (1980) 

BA, Lenoir-Rhyne; MA, Duke; PhD, Georgia 

J. Kline Harrison (1990) 

BS, Virginia; PhD, Maryland 

Nathan O. Hatch (2005) 

AB, Wheaton; AM, PhD, Washington (St. Louis) 

Angela Hattery (1998) 

BA, Carleton College; MS, PhD, Wisconsin 

Michael David Hazen (1974) 

BA, Seattle Pacific; MA, Wake Forest; PhD, Kansas 

Terry C. Hazen (1988) 

BS, MS, Michigan State; PhD, Wake Forest 

Richard E. Heard (1996) 

BM, Southern Methodist; MA, California (Santa Barbara) 

Thomas K. Heam Jr. (1983) 



Professor of Economics 

Hultquist Family Professor of Economics 

Adjunct Instructor in Anthropology 

Charles E. Taylor Professor of English 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

Lecturer in Philosophy 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Professor of Political Science 

Professor of Sociology 

Kemper Professor of Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Professor of History 

Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Fellow and 
Associate Professor of Sociology 

Professor of Communication 

Research Professor of Biology 

Associate Professor of Music 



Professor of Philosophy 



BA, Birmingham-Southern; BD, Southern Baptist Theo. Seminary; PhD, Vanderbilt 



Jac C. Heckelman (1996) 
BA, Texas; PhD, Maryland 

Robert Hellyer (2005) 

BA, Claremont McKenna College; MA, PhD, Star\ford 

Donald Helme (2003) 

BA, Michigan State; MA, Eastern Michigan; PhD, Kentucky 

Omaar Hena (2006) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, University College, Dublin, Virginia; 
ABD, Virginia 

Donna A. Henderson (1996) 

BA, Meredith; MAT, James Madison; PhD, Tennessee 

J. Edwin Hendricks (1961) 

BA, Furman; MA, PhD, Virginia 

R. Gant Hewett (2006) 

BA, MA, Appalachian State; ABD, UNC-Greensboro 

Avrim Hiller (2005) 

BA, Permsylvania; PhD, Duke 



Associate Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of History 

Assistant Professor of Commurucation 

Adjunct Instructor in English 

Professor of Counseling 

Professor of History 

Adjunct Instructor in Biology 

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Philosophy 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



278 



Yvonne L. Hinson (1997) PricewaterhouseCoopers Faculty Fellow and 

BS, MBA, UNC-Charlotte; Associate Professor of Accountancy 

PhD, Tennessee (W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Willie L. Hinze (1975) John B. White Professor of Chemistry 
BS, MA, Sam Houston State; PhD, Texas A«&M 

E. Clayton Hipp Jr. (1991) Senior Lecturer in Business 

BA, Wofford; (W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

MBA, JD, South Carolina . (Vienna, fall 2006) 

Alix Hitchcock (1989) Instructor in Art 
BFA, UNC-Greensboro; MA, New York 

Tania Hoeller-Castillero (2006) Adjunct Instructor in Counseling 
BA, UNC-Greensboro; MA, Wake Forest 

Kermeth G. Hoglund (1990) Professor of Religion 
BA, Wheaton; MA, PhD, Duke 

Jefferson Holdridge (2002) McCulloch Family Fellow and 

BA, San Francisco State; Associate Professor of English 

MA, PhD, University College (Dublin, Ireland) (Venice, fall 2007) 

Natalie A.W. Holzwarth (1983) Professor of Physics 
BS, Massachusetts Inst, of Tech.; PhD, Chicago 

Beth Hopkins (2003) Adjunct Lecturer in American Ethnic Studies 
BA, Wake Forest; Juris-prudence, William and Mary 

Katherine S. Hoppe (1993) Lecturer in Business 

BA, Duke; MBA, Texas Christian; (W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 
PhD, UNC-Greensboro 

Michael Horn (1998) Lecturer in English 
BS, Florida 

Fred L. Horton Jr. (1970) Albritton Professor of the Bible 

BA, UNC-Chapel Hill; (Department of Religion) 
BD, Union Theological Seminary; PhD, Duke 

William L. Hottinger (1970) Professor Emeritus of Health and Exercise Science 
BS, Slippery Rock; MS, PhD, Illinois 

Fredric T. Howard (1966) Professor of Mathematics 
BA, MA, Vanderbilt; PhD, Duke 

Hugh N. Howards (1997) Associate Professor of Mathematics 
BA, Williams; MA, PhD, California (San Diego) 

Linda S. Howe (1993) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 
BA, MA, PhD, Wisconsin 

Mary Elizabeth Howie (2006) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art 
BA, UNC-Chapel Hill; MFA, Louisiana State; ABDE, UNC-Chapel HiU 

Michael L. Hughes (1984) Professor of History 
BA, Claremont McKenna; MA, PhD, California (Berkeley) 

Jermifer G. Hudson (2006) Instructor in Accountancy 

BS, Wake Forest (W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Bilal Humeidan (2006) Visiting Jordanian Fulbright Scholar 
BA, MA, Jordan University of Science and Technology 

Michael J. Hyde (1994) University Distinguished Chair in Communication Ethics 

BS, Pittsburgh; MA, PhD, Purdue and Professor of Communication 

(Leave, fall 2007) 



279 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



Simeon O. Ilesanmi (1993) 

BA, University of Ife (Nigeria); PhD, Southern Methodist 

Joanne Inkman (1997) 

BM, NCSA; MA, PhD, UNC-Greensboro 

Matthew Irvin (2005) 

BS, MS, Virginia Commonwealth 

Suzanne T. Jabbour (2006) 
BS, JD, Wake Forest 

Julia Jackson-Newsom (2005) 

BA, Wake Forest; MS, PhD, Pennsylvania State 

Miriam Jacobson (2005) 

AB, Brown; PhD, Pennsylvania 

Sherry L. Jarrell 

BS, University of Delaware; MBA, PhD, Chicago 

Ernest S. Jarrett (1996) 

BA, UNC-Chapel Hill; MA, UNC-Greensboro 

Janine M. Jennings (1998) 
BS, University of Toronto; 
PhD, McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) 

Mark Jensen (1993) 
BA, Houston Baptist; 
MDiv, PhD, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Debra R. Jessup (1996) 



Associate Professor of Religion 



Lecturer in Music 

Visiting Instructor in Sociology 

Instructor in Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Assistant Professor in English 

Instructor in Business 

Instructor in Commurucation 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
(Leave, spring 2008) 

Adjunct Associate Professor of Religion 



BA, Georgetown; JD, Wake Forest 

Miaohua Jiang (1998) 

BS, Wuhan Uruversity (China); 

MS, East China Normal Uruversity (China); PhD, Perm State 

David J. John (1982) 

BS, Emory and Henry; MS, PhD, Emory 

A. Daniel Johnson (1998) 

BS, UNC-Charlotte; PhD, Wake Forest 

Erik C. Johnson (2005) 
BA, PhD, Maine 

*Lynne Johnson (2004) 

BA, MA, Wisconsin (Madison); MA, PhD, Maryland 

Bradley T. Jones (1989) 

BS, Wake Forest; PhD, Florida 

Paul B. Jones (2000) 

BS, Oklahoma State; PhD, Duke 



Lecturer in Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Sterge Faculty Fellow and 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 



Associate Professor of Computer Science 

Senior Lecturer in Biology 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
(Leave, 2007-08) 

Assistant Professor of Education 



Raymond Jones (2001) 

BA, UNC-Chapel Hill; MA, Wake Forest; PhD, University of Virgiiua 

Paul E. Juras (1991) Associate Professor of Accountancy 

BBA, MBA, Pace; PhD, Syracuse (W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Claudia Thomas Kairoff (1986) Professor of English 

BA, Notre Dame of Maryland; MA, Virginia; PhD, Brandeis 

Peter D. Kairoff (1988) Professor of Music 

BA, California (San Diego); MM, DMA, Southern California 



*Died March 3, 2007 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



280 



Jay R. Kaplan (1981) Professor of Anthropology and 

BA, Swarthmore; MA, PhD, Northwestern Adjunct Professor of Psychology 

Pamela R. Karr (1998) Instructor in Counseling 

BA, MAEd, Wake Forest 

Jeffrey Katula (2005) Visiting Assistant Professor of Health and Exercise Science 

BA, Augustana College; MA, Loyola; 
PhD, Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) 

Brian Kell (2005) Lecturer in Computer Science 

BS, California (Berkeley); MS, MIT; MS, SUNY, Albany 

Judy K. Kem (1987) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

BA, Western Kentucky; MA, Louisville; PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill (Leave, 2007-08) 

Charles H. Kennedy (1985) Professor of Political Science 

BA, Eckerd; AM, MPP, PhD, Duke 

Ralph C. Kennedy III (1976) Professor of Philosophy 

BA, PhD, California (Berkeley) 

William C. Kerr (1970) Professor of Physics 

BS, Wooster; PhD, Cornell 

Alisa Kessel (2005) Visiting Instructor in Political Science 

BA, MA, Arizona State 

Lisa Kiang (2006) Assistant Professor of Psychology 

BS, Maryland; PhD, Denver 

Daniel B. Kim-Shapiro (1996) Professor of Physics 

BA, Carleton College; MS, Southern Illinois; 
PhD, Califorrua (Berkeley) 

Charles A. Kimball (1996) Professor of Religion 

BS, Oklahoma State; MDiv, Southern Baptist Theo. Seminary; ThD, Harvard 

Angela Glisan King (1995) Senior Lecturer in Chemistry 

BA, Permsylvarua; PhD, Cornell 

S. Bruce King (1995) Professor of Chemistry 

BS, West Virginia; PhD, Cornell 

Wayne King (1993) Associate Professor of Journalism 

BA, UNC-Chapel Hill (Department of English) 

Ellen E. Kirkman (1975) Professor of Mathematics 

BA, Wooster; MA, MS, PhD, Michigan State 

Scott W. Klein (1991) Associate Professor of English 

AB, Harvard; BA, MA, Cambridge; MA, MPhil; PhD, Yale 

Lee G. Kiught (1979, 2000) Hylton Professor of Accountancy 

BS, Western Kentucky; MA, PhD, Alabama (W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Robert Knott (1975) Professor of Art 

BA, Stanford; MA, Illinois; PhD, Pennsylvania 

Dilip K. Kondepudi (1987) Thurman D. Kitchin Professor of Chemistry 

BS, Madras (India); MS, Indian Institute of Technology (Bombay); 
PhD, Texas 

Philip Kowalski (2006) Visiting Instructor in English 

BA, Salem State College; MA, Chicago 

Marina Krcmar (2006) Associate Professor of Communication 

BA, Farleigh Dickinson; MA, Pennsylvania; PhD, Wisconsin (Madison) 

Kathleen A. Kron (1991) Professor of Biology 

BS, MS, Michigan State; PhD, Florida 



281 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



Philip F. Kuberski (1989) Professor of Er^glish 

BA, MA, PhD, California (Irvine) (Leave, 2007-08) 

Raymond E. Ktihn (1968) WUliam L. Poteat Professor of Biology 

BS, Carson-Newman; PhD, Tennessee 

James Kuzmanovich (1972) . Professor of Mathematics 

BS, Rose Polytechnic; PhD, Wisconsin 

Abdessadek Lachgar (1991) Professor of Chemistry 

BS, MS, PhD, University of Nantes (France) 

Hugo C. Lane (1973) Professor of Biology 

Licenciate of the Biological Sciences, 
Doctorate of the Biological Sciences, Geneva 

Page H. Laughlm (1987) J. Smith Young Family Fellow and Professor of Art 

BA, Virginia; MFA, Rhode Island School of Design (Leave, 2007-08) 

Michael W Lawless (2005) Associate Professor of Business 

BS, St John's; MBA, PhD, Anderson UCLA (W. Calloway School of Business and Accoimtancy) 

Michael S. Lawlor (1986) Professor of Economics 

BA, Texas (Austin); PhD, Iowa State 

Nancy Lawrence (2006) Instructor in Philosophy 

BA, MA, Texas A&M; MA, ABD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Wei-chin Lee (1987) Professor of Political Science 

BA, National Taiwan University; MA, PhD, Oregon 

Wm-chiat Lee (1983) Associate Professor of Philosophy 

BA, Cornell; PhD, Princeton 

Dennis A. Lemly (2006) Research Associate Professor of Biology 

AAS, Haywood Technical Institute; 
BS, Western Carolina; MA, PhD, Wake Forest 

Ana Leon-Tavora (2002) Visiting Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

BA, MA, PhD, University of Seville 

BUI J. Leonard (1996) Adjunct Professor of Religion 

BA, Texas Wesleyan; MDiv., Southwestern Baptist Theo. Seminary; 
PhD, Boston 

Candyce Leonard (1996) Associate Professor of Himianities 

BA, Texas Wesleyan; MA, MEd, Louisville; PhD, Indiana (Bloomington) 

Jeffrey D. Lemer (1994) Associate Professor of History 

BA, MA, PhD, Wisconsin (Madison) 

Janna Levin (2006) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Physics 

BS, Bates College; MS, Massachusetts; PhD, Virginia 

David B. Levy (1976) Professor of Music 

BM, MA, Eastman; PhD, Rochester 

Kathryn Levy (1988) Senior Lecturer in Music 

BM, Eastman 

Bruce R. Lewis (2002) Cooper Family Fellow in Information Systems 

BS, Eastern Kentucky; and Assistant Professor 

MS, New Mexico State; PhD, Auburn (W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Charles M. Lewis (1968) Professor of Philosophy 

BA, Wake Forest; ThM, Harvard; PhD, Vanderbilt 

Inez Yarborough Liggins (2005) Adjunct Instructor in Dance 

BFA, UNC-Greensboro; MFA, Virginia Tech 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 282 



Assistant Professor of Political Science 
(Leave, fall 2007) 

Adjunct Professor of Education 



Adjunct Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures 



Sarah Lischer (2005) 

BS, Georgetown; MA Harvard; PhD, MIT 

John H. Litcher (1973) 

BS, Winona State; MA, PhD, Minnesota 

Shaozhong Liu (2005) 

BA, Guangxi Normal University; 

PhD, Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, UNC-Greensboro 

Gary Ljungquist (2005) Adjunct Professor of Women's and Gender Studies 

BA, Clark; PhD, Cornell 

John T. Llewellyn (1990) Associate Professor of Conmiunication 

AB, UNC-Chapel Hill; MA, Arkansas; PhD, Texas 

Dan S. Locklair (1982) Professor of Music 

BM, Mars Hill; SMM, Union Theological Seminary; DMA, Eastman and Composer-in-Residence 

Charles F. Longino Jr. (1991) Washington M. Wingate Professor of Sociology 

BA, Mississippi; MA, Colorado; PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Alyssa Lonner (2003) Assistant Professor of German and Russian 

BA, Technische Universitot Braunschweig; 
MA, Westfalische Wilhelms-Universita Miinster; PhD, Washington 

Pat C. W. Lord (2000) Lecturer in Biology 

BS, NC State; PhD, Wake Forest 

Allan D. Louden (1985) Associate Professor of Communication 

BA, Montana State; MA, Montana; PhD, Southern Califorrua 

Charlotte C. Weber Professor of Art 



David M. Lubin (1999) 

BA, Ohio State; MA, PhD, Yale 

Nina Maria Lucas (1996) 

BFA, Ohio State; MFA, UCLA 

JackLucido (2005) 

BA, California State; MFA, UNC-Greensboro 

John A. MacDonald (2006) 

BA, Wake Forest; ABD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Jed Macosko (2004) 

BS, MIT; PhD, California (Berkeley) 

Barry G. Maine (1981) 

BA, Virginia; MA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Thomas Malinzak (2006) 

AA, Forsyth Technical College; BA, Cleveland State; 
MM, UNC-Greensboro 

AUen Mandelbaum (1989) 

BA, Yeshiva; MA, PhD, Columbia 

William M. Marcum (1996) 

BA, Furman; MA, UNC-Greensboro; 
PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Anthony P Marsh (1996) 

BPE, MED, Western Australia; PhD, Arizona State 

Dale R. Martin (1982) 

BS, MS, Illinois State; DBA, Kenhicky 

George E. Matthews Jr. (1979) 
BS, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 



Associate Professor of Dance 

Lecturer in Communication 

Visiting Instructor in Economics 

Assistant Professor of Physics 
(Leave, faU 2007) 

Professor of English 
Adjunct Instructor in Computer Science 

WR. Kenan Jr. Professor of Humanities 

Citibank Faculty Fellow and 

Associate Professor of Business 

(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Associate Professor of Health and Exercise Science 

Wayne Calloway Professor of Accountancy 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Professor of Physics 



283 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



Darlene R. May (2005) Adjunct Associate Professor of Classical Languages 

BA, MA, PhD, Indiana 

J. Gaylord May (1961) Professor of Mathematics 

BS, Wofford; MA, PhD, Virginia 

Kathryn Mayers (2003) Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

BA, SUNY (Binghamton); MA, PhD, Wisconsin (Madison) 

John MacDonald (2005) Visiting Instructor in Economics 

BA, Wake Forest; PhD, UNC-Chapel HiU 

Grant P. McAllister (2001) Assistant Professor of German 

BA, MA, PhD, Utah 

Anita K. McCauley (2002) Director of Microscopy and 

BS, Elon College; PhD, Wake Forest Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biology 

Kent McConnell (2004) Visiting Instructor in History 

BA, Westminster College; MDiv, Yale; 
ThM, Princeton Theological Seminary 

Leah P. McCoy (1990) Associate Professor of Education 

BS, West Virgirua Inst, of Tech.; 
MA, Maryland; EdD, Virginia Poly Inst. & SU 

Gordon E. McCray (1994) BellSouth Mobility Technology 

BS, Wake Forest; Associate Professor of Business 

MBA, Stetson; PhD, Florida State (W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Thomas W. McGohey (1990) Senior Lecturer in English 

BA, MA, Michigan State; MFA, UNC-Greensboro 

John McNally (2001) Ollen R. Nalley Associate Professor of English 

BA, Southern Illinois; MFA, Iowa; PhD, Nebraska 

Veronique M. McNelly (2002) Instructor in Romance Languages 

BA, MA, Virginia 

Gordon A. Melson (1991) Professor of Chemistry 

BS, PhD, Sheffield (England) 

Batja Mesquita (1997) Lee Faculty Fellow and Associate Professor of Psychology 

BA, MA, PhD, Amsterdam (The Netherlands) 

Stephen P. Messier (1981) Professor of Health and Exercise Science 

BS, MS, Rhode Island; PhD, Temple 

Soledad Miguel-Prendes (1993) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

Licenciatura, Oviedo; MA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Shannon L. Mihalko (1999) Dimn-Riley Jr. Professor and 

BS, Wake Forest; MS, PhD, Illinois Associate Professor of Health and Exercise Science 

Christian Miller (2004) Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

BA, Princeton; MA, PhD, Notre Dame 

Ellen Ruth Miller (2002) Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

BA, George Washington; MA, New York; PhD, Washington 

Gary D. Miller (1996) Associate Professor of Health and Exercise Science 

BS, Kansas; MS, Kansas State; PhD, California (Davis) 

Susan M. Miller (2006) Visiting Instructor in English 

BA, Rice; ABD, Harvard 

Timothy E. Miller (2003) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Physics 

BS, Mississippi State; PhD, Vanderbilt 

Joseph O. Milner (1969) Professor of Education 

BA, Davidson; MA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 284 



Ananda Mitra (1994) 

B Tech, Indian Inst, of Technology (Kharagpur); 
MA, Wake Forest; PhD, Illinois (Urbana) 

Tina M. Miyake (2006) 
BS, MS, Idaho State 



Associate Professor of Commurucation 

Adjunct Instructor in Psychology 
Visiting Instructor in Economics 
Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion 



Blair C. Mongado (2006) 

BS, University of the Philippines; MA, ABD, Virginia Tech 

Megan B. Moore (2005) 

BS, Duke; MA, Wake Forest; PhD, Emory 

John C. Moorhouse (1969) 

BA, Wabash; PhD, Northwestern 

Patrick E. Moran (1989) 

BA, MA, Stanford; MA, National 
Taiwan University; PhD, Pennsylvania 

Roberta Morosini (2000) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

DEA, Uruversity of Rermes 11 (France); PhD, McGill (Montreal) 

Rebekah L. Morris (2006) Instructor in Romance Languages 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, Virginia 

Donald J. Moser (1995) Adjunct Instructor in Military Science 

BS, LTC (Ret.), U.S. Military Academy (West Point); MBA, Long Island 



Archie Carroll Professor of Ethical Leadership 
(Department of Economics) 

Associate Professor of Chinese 
(East Asian Languages and Cultures) 



William M. Moss (1971) 

BA, Davidson; PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Gloria K. Muday (1991) 

BS, Virginia Poly. Inst, and SU; PhD, Purdue 

Stephen Murphy (1987) 

BA, Canisius; MA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Michelle J. Naughton 
BA, PhD, Iowa 

Lynn Neal (2006) 

BA, Houghton CoUege; MTS, Duke; MA, PhD, UNC-Chapel HiU 

Debbie W. Newsome (1999) 

BA, Oklahoma Baptist; MEd, Wake Forest; PhD, UNC-Creensboro 

Linda N. Nielsen (1974) 
BA, MS, EdD, Teruiessee 

Mary Niepold (2003) 
BA, Wake Forest 



Professor of English 

Professor of Biology 
(Leave 2007-08) 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages 
(French) (Dijon, fall 2007) 

Adjunct Professor of Women's and Gender Studies 



Assistant Professor of Religion 

Assistant Professor of CourxseUng 

Professor of Education 

Visiting Instructor in English 



Patricia A. Nixon (1999) 

BS, Boston; MA, PhD, Pittsburgh 

Ronald E. Noftle (1967) 

BS, New Hampshire; PhD, Washington 

James L. Norris HI (1989) 

BS, MS (Science), MS (Statistics), NC State; PhD, Florida State 

Colleen C. O'Brian (2006) 

BA, Le Moyne College; MA, PhD, Michigan 

Monique O'Connell (2004) 

BA, Brown; PhD, Northwestern 

Conor O'Callaghan (2005) 

MLit, Trinity College (Dublin) 



Associate Professor of Health and Exercise Science 



Professor of Chemistry 

Professor of Mathematics 

Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

Assistant Professor of History 

Visiting Poet-in-Residence (English) 



285 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



Dee Oseroff-Vamell (1996) 
BA, MA, PhD, Washington 

Claudia Ospina (2006) 

BA, Pontificia University Javeriana (Colombia); MA, Ohio 

Beatrice Ottersbock (1999) 

BA, Chatham CoUege; MA, PhD, Pittsburgh 

Gillian Rose Overing (1979) 

BA, Lancaster (England); MA, PhD, SUNY (Buffalo) 

Adriano Palma (2006) 

Diploma, Universita degli studi di Pisa (Italy); PhD, Indiana 

Anthony S. Parent Jr. (1989) 

BA, Loyola; MA, PhD, California (Los Angeles) 

R. Jason Parsley (2006) 

BS, Duke; PhD, Pennsylvannia 

Perry L. Patterson (1986) - - - 

BA, Indiana; MA, PhD, Northwestern 



Adjunct Assistant Professor of Commimication 

Instructor in Romance Languages 

Lecturer in Art History (Vienna) 

Professor of English 

Adjunct Professor of Philosophy 

Associate Professor of History 



Assistant Professor of Mathematics 



Professor of Economics and Lecturer in Russian 



V. Paul Pauca (2002) 

BS, MS, Wake Forest; PhD, Duke 

Benjamin Paz (2004) 

BME, University of Minnesota; MBA, Stanford 

Ann M. Peiffer (2006) 

BA, Cornell College; MS, PhD, Connecticut 

Stephanie Pellet (2006) 
MA, PhD, Texas 

Mary L. B. Pendergraft (1988) 
BA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Linda Petrou (2006) 

AA, Anne Arundel Community College; BA, MA, PhD, Maryland 

David P PhilUps (1994) 

BA, Cornell; M.Arch., Washington; MA, PhD, Permsylvania 

John R. Pickel (1997) 

BFA, Indiana State; MFA, Cranbrook Academy of Art 

Mark Pirolo (2006) 

BFA, Carnegie-Mellon 

Robert J. Plemmons (1990) 

BS, Wake Forest; PhD, Auburn 

Danielle Powell (2004) 

BA, James Madison; MA, Wake Forest 

James T. Powell (1988) 

BA, Emory; MPhil, MA, PhD, Yale 

Jason E. Powell (2004) 

BA, Trinity; MSt, DPhil, Oxford 

Kersti Powell (2004) 

BA, University of Tallinn (Estonia); 

MA, University of Tartu; MSt, DPhil, Oxford 

Wayne E. Pratt (2006) 

BA, Vermont; MS, PhD, Utah 



Assistant Professor of Computer Science 



Visiting Lectiirer in Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

Professor of Classical Languages 

Adjunct Assitant Professor of Communication 

Associate Professor of Japanese 
(East Asian Languages and Cultures) 

Associate Professor of Art 

Adjunct Instructor in Theatre & Dance 

Reynolds Professor of Mathematics and 
Computer Science 

Adjunct Instructor in Communication 

Associate Professor of Classical Languages 

Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 286 



Jenny Puckett (1995) Instructor in Romance Languages 

BA, Wake Forest; N4A, Middlebury 

Teresa Radomski (1977) Professor of Music 

BM, Eastman; MM, Colorado 

Yasuko T. Railings (1998) Senior Lecturer in East Asian Languages and Cultures 

BA, Seinan Gakuin University (Japan); MA, Ohio 

Thomas H. Ramsey (2003) Instructor in Business 

BS, Grove City College; MBA, Pittsburgh (W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Herman Rapaport (2006) Rejmolds Professor of English 

BA, California State College; MA, California (Los Angeles); 
PhD, California (Irvine) 

Sarah Raynor (2003) Sterge Faculty Fellow and Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

BS, Yale, PhD, MIT (Leave, fall 2007) 

Mary Lynn B. Redmond (1989) Associate Professor of Education 

BA, EdD, UNC-Greensboro; MEd, UNC-Chapel Hill 

W. Jack Rejeski Jr. (1978) Thurman D. Kitchin Professor of Health and Exercise Science; 

BS, Norwich; MA, PhD, Cormecticut Adjunct Professor of Psychology 

Corey R. Remle (2006) Visiting Instructor in Sociology 

BA, New College of the University of South Florida; MA Duke 

Paul M. Ribisl (1973) Charles E. Taylor Professor of Health and Exercise Science 

BS, Pittsburgh; MA, Kent State; PhD, Illinois (Leave, 2007-08) 

Jessica Richard (2002) Assistant Professor of English 

BA, Goucher; MA, PhD, Princeton 

Albert Rives (2002) Visiting Professor of Chemistry 

BS, Wake Forest; PhD, Wisconsin (Madison) 

Donald R Robin (1997) J. Tylee Wilson Chair of Business Ethics 

BS, MBA, PhD, Louisiana State (W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Kermeth Wayne Robinson (1998) Adjunct Instructor in Anthropology 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, Kentucky 

Stephen B. Robinson (1991) Professor of Mathematics 

BA, PhD, California (Santa Cruz) 

Randall G. Rogan (1990) Professor of Communication 

BA, St. John Fisher College; MS, PhD, Michigan State 

Luis Roniger (2003) Reynolds Professor of Latin- American Studies 

Licenciate in Sociology, Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires; 
MA, PhD, Hebrew University of Jerusalem 

Jeffrey Rosenthal (2005) Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology 

BA, Northwestern; MA, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Leah Roy (2002) ' Visiting Assistant Professor of Theatre 

BFA, Montana; MFA, Wisconsin 

Susan Z. Rupp (1993) Associate Professor of History 

BA, Grinnell; AM, Harvard; MA, PhD, Stanford 

Akbar Salam (2003) Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

BS, PhD, University of London 

Fred R. Salsbury Jr. (2002) Assistant Professor of Physics 

BS, Chicago; PhD, California (Berkeley) 

Ivo Sanchez (2004) Instructor in Romance Languages 

BA, MA, Wisconsin 



287 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



Maria Teresa Sanhueza (1996) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

BA, MA, Concepcion (Chile); PhD, Michigan (Ann Arbor) (Salamanca, fall 2007) 

Peter Santago (1989) Adjunct Associate Professor of Physics 

BS, Virginia Poly. Inst, and SU; PhD, NC State 

James A. Schirillo (1996) Associate Professor of Psychology 

BA, Franklin & Marshall; PhD, Northeastern 

John J. Schmidt (2006) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Counseling 

BA, MAT, St. Michael's College; EdD, UNC-Greensboro 

Marianne A. Schubert (1977) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Counseling 

BA, Dayton; MA, PhD, Southern Illinois 

Katie Scott (1985) Lecturer in Art History (London) 

BA Horis., London 

Richard D. Sears (1964) Adjunct Professor of Political Science 

BA, Clark; MA, PhD, tidiana 

Joseph F. Seay (2006) Visiting Assistant Professor of Health & Exercise Science 

BS, MS, Delaware; PhD, Massachusetts 

Catherine E. Seta (1987) Professor of Psychology 

BA, MA, PhD, UNC-Greensboro 

Brantly Bright Shapiro (1984) Lecturer in Dance 

Kurt C. Shaw (1987) Associate Professor of German and Russian 

BA, Missouri; MA, PhD, Kansas 

Bryan Shelly (2005) Assistant Professor of Political Science 

BA, Tufts; PhD, Princeton 

Yaohua Shi (2002) Assistant Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures 

BA, Shanghai Foreign Languages Institute; 
MA, Clark; PhD, Indiana 

Carol A. Shively (1990) Professor of Psychology 

BA, Hiram; MA, PhD, California (Davis) 

Rebecca Shore (2003) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Education 

BM, Louisiana State; MA, California State; PhD, Southern California 

Peter M. Siavelis (1996) Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Fellow and 

BA, Bradley; MA, PhD, Georgetown Associate Professor of Political Science 

Gale Sigal (1987) Professor of EngUsh 

BA, City College (New York); MA, Fordham; PhD, CUNY (Graduate Center) 

Alycia K. Siknan (2003) Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology 

BA, Westminster College; MA, Wake Forest; PhD, UNC-Greensboro 

Miles R. Silman (1998) Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Fellow 

BA, Missouri; PhD, Duke and Associate Professor of Biology 

Wayne L. Silver (1985) Professor of Biology 

BA, Pennsylvania; PhD, Florida State 

Kenneth W. Simington (2006) Adjunct Assistant Professor of Counseling 

BA, MEd, UNC-Chapel Hill; PhD, UNC-Greensboro 

Jearme M. Simonelli (1999) Professor of Anthropology 

BA, MA, PhD, Oklahoma; MPH, Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center 

Robert Simpson (1997) Adjunct Instructor in Dance 

Cyndi Skaar (2003) Instructor in Business 

BS, BA, University of Minnesota; (W. CaUoway School of Business and Accountancy) 

MBA, Wake Forest 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 288 



Charles SUgh (2005) 

BA, Belmont; MA, Baylor; PhD, Virginia 

WUliam W. Sloan Jr. (1994) 

BA, Davidson; MA, Wake Forest; PhD, Miami (Ohio) 

Earl Smith (1996) 

BA, SUNY (Stony Brook); MA, PhD, Connecticut 

J. Howell Smith (1965) 

BA, Baylor; MA, Tulane; PhD, Wisconsin 

Kathy B. Smith (1981) 

BA, Baldwin- Wallace; MA, PhD, Purdue 

Margaret Supplee Smith (1979) 

BS, Missouri; MA, Case Western Reserve; PhD, Brown 

Ross Smith (2006) 

Teresa Smith (2004) 
BS, MA, PhD, Florida 



Visiting Instructor in English 

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Rubin Professor of American Ethnic Studies 
and Professor of Sociology 

Professor of History 

Professor of Political Science 

Harold W. Tribble Professor of Art 

Adjunct Instructor in Communication 
Adjunct Professor of Women's and Gender Studies 



Charles H. Babcock Chair of Botany 

Associate Professor of Sociology 

Associate Professor of Psychology 



William K. Smith (1998) 

BS, MS, California State; PhD, California (Los Angeles) 

Joseph Soares (2003) 

BA, Rutgers; MA, PhD, Harvard 

Cecilia H. Solano (1977) 

BA, Harvard; MA, PhD, Johns Hopkins 

Morten Solvik (2003) 

BA, Cornell; PhD, Pennsylvania 

Christina Tsoules Soriano (2006) 

BA, Trinity College; MFA, Smith College 

Deborah Kim Muller Spencer (2002) 

BPA, Oklahoma City; MEd, Central Oklahoma 

Michelle D. Steward (2004) 
BA, MBA, West Florida; 
PhD, Arizona State 

Eleanor P. StoUer 

AB, Grinnell CoUege; AM, PhD, Washington 

Eric R. Stone (1994) 

BA, Delaware; MA, PhD, Michigan 

John H. Stoneburg IV (2006) 

BS, Wayland Baptist; MA, Webster 

David H. Stroupe (1990) 

BS, Wake Forest; MA, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Cynthia K. Suerken (2006) 
BS, Vanderbilt; MS, Georgia 

Elaine K. Swartzentruber (1999) 

BA, Colorado; MA, Chicago Theological Seminary; PhD, Emory 

Patricia Swier (2005) Visiting Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

BA, Charleston; MA, Rutgers; PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Robert L. Swofford (1993) Professor of Chemistry 

BS, Furman; PhD, Califorrua (Berkeley) 

Darrell L. Sydnor (2005) Assistant Professor of Military Science 

BS, Tuskegee; MSA, Central Michigan 



Lecturer in Music 
(Vienna) 

Assistant Professor of Theatre and Dance 

Adjunct Instructor in Dance 

Assistant Professor of Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Research Professor of Sociology and Gerontology 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

Assistant Professor of Military Science 

Instructor in Health and Exercise Science 

Adjunct Instructor in Mathematics 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion 



289 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



Brian Tague (1995) 

ScB, AB, Brown; PhD, California (San Diego) 

Ian M. Taplin (1985) 

The College of Architecture, Oxford (England); 

BA, York (England); MPhil, Leicester (England); PhD, Brown 

KendaU B. Tarte (1996) 
BA, MA, PhD, Virginia 

Paul Thacker (2003) 

BS, Tulane; MA, PhD, Southern Methodist 

Rebecca Thomas (1993) 

BA, MA, California (Los Angeles); PhD, Ohio State 

Stan J. Thomas (1983) ' 

BS, Davidson; PhD, Vanderbilt 

Clark Thompson (2001) _ — 

BA, JD, PhD, Virginia 

Harry B.Tihis Jr. (1981) 

BA, Wisconsin (Milwaukee); MFA, PhD, Princeton 

Suzanne Tobey (2005) 
BS, Florida; PhD, Texas 

Patrick J. Toner (2006) 

BA, MA, Franciscan University of Steubenville; PhD, Virginia 

Todd C. Torgersen (1989) 

BS, MS, Syracuse; PhD, Delaware 

Ralph B. Tower (1980) 

BA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill; MBA, Cornell 

Julianne Treme (2006) 
BA, Elon 

Chad Trevitte (2004) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Maria-Encarna Moreno Turner (1999) 
BA, MA, Brigham Young 

William H. Turkett Jr. (2004) 

BS, College of Charleston; PhD, South Carolina 

Kamil Burak U?er (2004 ) 

BSEE, Middle East Technical University, (Turkey); 
MSEE, Princeton; PhD, Rochester 

Robert W. Ulery Jr. (1971) 
BA, MA, PhD, Yale 

Robert L. Utley Jr. (1978) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, Duke 

Olga Valbuena-Hanson (1996) 

BA, Irvine; MA, PhD, SUNY (Buffalo) 

James B. Varner (2006) 

BS, Wake Forest; MAB, Virginia 

Laura J. Veach (1999) 

BA, MEd, Wake Forest; PhD, New Orleans 

Stephen C. VeUa (2006) 

AB Princeton; MA, M.Phil, Yale 



Associate Professor of Biology 

Professor of Sociology 
(Veruce, spring 2008) 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

Associate Professor of German 

(Vienna, fall 2007) 

(Leave, spring 2008) 

Associate Professor of Computer Science 

Lecturer in Philosophy 

Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
(Leave, spring 2008) 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

Associate Professor of Computer Science 

Wayne Calloway Professor of Taxation 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Visiting Instructor in Economics 

Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

Lnstructor in Romance Languages 

Assistant Professor of Computer Science 

Research Associate Professor of Physics 

Professor of Classical Languages 

Professor of Humanities 

Associate Professor of English 

Instructor in Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Assistant Professor of Counseling 
Instructor in History 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



290 



AUcia Vitti (2005) 

BA, Salem College; MA, UNC-Greensboro; 
PhD, Middlebury College 

Antonio Carlo Vitti (1986) 

BA, MA, Wayne State; PhD, Michigan 

Timothy K. Wagner (2006) 

BS, Rochester; PhD, Maryland 

Ana M. Wahl (2002) 

BS, Creighton; MA, PhD, Indiana 

Gregory Warrington (2003) 
BA, Princeton; PhD, Harvard 



Visiting Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

Professor of Romance Languages 

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Physics 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 

Sterge Faculty Fellow and Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Professor of History 



Sarah L. Watts (1987) 

BA, Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts; MA, PhD, Oklahoma 

Elizabeth Way (2006) Adjunct Assistant Professor of English 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, University of Durham (England); PhD, Georgia 

Julie H. Wayne (2003) Adjunct Assistant Professor 

BS, Furman; MS, PhD, Georgia (Athens) (W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 



Mary R. Wayne-Thomas (1980) 

BFA, Pennsylvania State; MFA, Ohio State 

Peter D. Weigl (1968) 

BA, Williams; PhD, Duke 

David R Weinstein (1989) 

BA, Colorado College; MA, Connecticut; PhD, Johns Hopkins 

Catherine O. Welder (2006) 

BS, Wake Forest; PhD, Georgia Institute of Technology 

Mark E. Welker (1987) 

BS, UNC-Chapel Hill; PhD, Florida State 

Byron R. Wells (1981) 

BA, MA, Georgia; PhD, Columbia 

Helga A. Welsh (1993) 

MA, PhD, University of Muruch 

G. Page West HI (1995) 

BA, Hamilton; MBA, Dartmouth; 
PhD, Colorado (Boulder) 

Larry E. West (1969) 

BA, Berea; PhD, Vanderbilt 

Dorotiiy M. Westmoreland (2002) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, Cincinnati; JD, Wake Forest 

Robert M. Whaples (1991) 

BA, Maryland; PhD, Permsylvania 

Jarrod Whitaker (2005) 

BA, MA, University of Canterbury (New Zealand); PhD, Texas 

M. Stanley Whitley (1990) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, Cornell 

Stephen L. Whittington (2002) 

AB, Chicago; MA, PhD, Penn State 

Ulrike Wiethaus (1991) 

Colloquium at Kirchliche Hochschule (Berlin, Germany); 
MA, PhD, Temple 



Associate Professor of Theatre 

Professor of Biology 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

Visiting Associate Professor of Chemistry 

William L. Poteat Professor of Chemistry 

Professor of Romance Languages 

Associate Professor of Political Science 



Professor of Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 



Professor of German 

Adjtmct Instructor in Classical Languages 

Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Religion 

Professor of Romance Languages 



Adjunct Associate Professor of Anthropology 
and Director of the Museum of Anthropology 

Professor of Humanities 



291 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



Heiko Wiggers (2005) 

BA, MA, Eastern Washington 

Elisabeth d'Empaire Wilbert (1999) 
BA, MA, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Jack E. Wilkerson Jr. (1989) 
BS, Bob Jones; PhD, Texas 

Charles Wilkins (2006) 

BA, Duke; MA, Ohio State; PhD, Harvard 

Alan J. Williams (1974) 
BA, Stanford; PhD, Yale 

Richard T. Williams (1985) 

BS, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, Princeton 



Lecturer in German and Russian 

Lecturer in Romance Languages 

Professor of Accountancy 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Assistant Professor of History 

Professor of History 

Reynolds Professor of Physics 
(Leave, fall 2007) 



Visiting Assistant Professor 
of Women's and Gender Studies 



Patricia K. Willis (2007) 

BA, East Carolina; MA, Florida State; MA, PhD., SUNY (Albany) 

David C. Wilson (1984, 1987) -, 

BS, Wake Forest; MAT, Emory 

Eric Wilson (1998) 

BA, Appalachian State; MA, Wake Forest; 

PhD, The Graduate School and University Center, CUNY 

Tracy Wilson (2003) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, Appalachian State 

Yue-Ling Wong (2001) 

BS, Hong Kong Baptist College; PhD, Texas (Austin) 

Frank B. Wood (1971) 
BA, MA, Wake Forest; 
MDiv, Southeastern Baptist Theo. Seminary; PhD, Duke 

John H. Wood (1985) 

BS, Ohio; MA, Michigan State; PhD, Purdue 

Pia Christina Wood (1999) 

BA, William and Mary; MIBS, South Carolina; MA, New Mexico; 
PhD, Graduate Institute for International Studies (Switzerland) 

Sharon K. Woodard (1998) Instructor in Health and Exercise Science 

BS, Central Michigan; MS, Wake Forest 

David Yamane (2005) Assistant Professor of Sociology 

BA, California (Berkeley); MS, PhD, Wisconsin (Madison) 

Owen Yeates (2006) Visiting Instructor in Political Science 

BS, Brigham Young; MA, ABD, Duke 

Itza A. Zavala-Garrett (2004) Visiting Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

Licenciada en letras Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro, Mexico; 
MA, Western Michigan 



Instructor in Mathematics 

Thomas H. Pritchard Professor of English 
(Leave faU 2007) 

Instructor in Education 

Lecturer in Digital Media 

Adjunct Professor of Psychology 

Reynolds Professor of Economics 
Associate Professor of Political Science 



Clifford W. Zeyl (1997) 

BSc, University of Guelph; MSc, PhD, McGill 

Ofer A. Zmiri (2006) 

BA, Ilan University (Tel Aviv, Israel); MA, McGill; 
PhD, Harvard 



Associate Professor of Biology 
Adjunct Professor of American Ethnic Studies 



Margaret D. Zulick (1991) 

BM, Westminster Choir College; 
MA, Earlham School of Religion; 
MTS, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary; PhD, Northwestern 



Associate Professor of Communication 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTIES 



292 



Emeriti 




Dates following names indicate period of service. 



Ralph D. Amen (1962-1993) 

BA, MA, Northern Colorado; MBS, PhD, Colorado 

John William Angell (1955-1990) 

BA, Wake Forest; STM, Andover Newton; 
ThM, PhD, Southern Baptist Theo. Seminary 

James R Barefield (1963-2004) 

BA, MA, Rice; PhD, Johns Hopkins 

Richard C. Bamett (1961-1994) 

BA, Wake Forest; MEd, PhD, UNC-Chapel HUl 

John V. Baxley (1968-2004) 

BS, MS, Georgia Tech; PhD, Wisconsin 

Robert W. Brehme (1959-1995) 

BS, Roanoke; MS, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

David G. Brown (1990-2003) 
AB, Deruson; PhD, Princeton 

George McLeod Bryan (1956-1987) 
BA, MA, Wake Forest; BD, PhD, Yale 

Shasta M. Bryant (1966-1987) 

BA, MA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Julian C. Burroughs Jr. (1958-1994) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, Michigan 

Christa G. CaroUo (1985-2005) 

BA, UNC-Greensboro; MA, EHike 

John A. Carter Jr. (1961-1997) 

BA, Virginia; MA, PhD, Princeton 

Dorothy Casey (1949-1988) 

BS, UNC-Greensboro; MA, UNC-Chapel HiU 

David W. Catron (1963-1994) 

BA, Furman; PhD, George Peabody 

Leon R Cook Jr. (1957-1993) 
BS, Virginia Poly. Inst. & SU; 
MS, Tennessee 

Leon H. Corbett Jr. (1968-2002) 
BA, JD, Wake Forest 

Nancy J. Cotton (1977-2002) 

BA, Texas; MA, Wisconsin; PhD, Columbia 

Cyclone Covey (1968-1988) 
BA, PhD, Stanford 

James H. Dodding (1979-2005) 

Diploma, Rose Bruford College of Speech and Drama (London); 
Cert., Birmingham; Cert., Westhill Training College (Birmingham); 
Diploma, Theatre on the Balustrade (Prague) 



Professor Emeritus of Biology 
Easley Professor Emeritus of Religion 

Wake Forest Professor Emeritus of History 

Professor Emeritus of History 

Wake Forest Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

Professor Emeritus of Physics 

Provost Emeritus 

Professor Emeritus of Religion 

Professor Emeritus of Romance Languages 

Professor Emeritus of Speech Communication 

Senior Lecturer Emerita in German 

Professor Emeritus of English 

Associate Professor Emerita of 
Health and Sport Science 

Professor Emeritus of Psychology 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Accounting 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Vice President and Counsel Emeritus 

Professor Emerita of English 

Professor Emeritus of History 



Professor Emeritus of Theatre 



293 



Robert H. Dufort (1961-1999) 
BA, PhD, Duke 

John S. Dunkelberg (1983-2001) 
BS, Clemson; 
MBA, PhD, South Carolina 

John R. Earle (1963-2001) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Eddie V. Easley (1984-1999) 

BS, Virginia State; MS, PhD, Iowa State 

Leo Ellison Jr. (1957-1999) 
BS, MS, Northwestern State 

Thomas M. Ehnore (1962-1996) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, George Peabody; PhD, Ohio State 

David K. Evans (1966-1998) 

BS, Tulane; PhD, California (Berkeley) 

Jack D. Fleer (1964-2002) 

BA, Oklahoma Baptist; MS, Florida State; 
PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Doyle R. Fosso (1964-1995) 

AB, PhD, Harvard; MA, Michigan 

Caroline Sandlin FuUerton (1969-1990) 
BA, Rollins; MFA, Texas Christian 



Professor Emeritus of Psychology 

Kemper Professor Emeritus of Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Professor Emeritus of Sociology 

Professor Emeritus of Business 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Associate Professor Emeritus 
of Health and Exercise Science 

Professor Emeritus of Education 



Professor Emeritus of Anthropology 
Professor Emeritus of Political Science 

Professor Emeritus of English 



Kathleen M. Glenn (1974-1998) 
BA, MA, PhD, Stanford 

Paul M. Gross Jr. (1959-1987) 
BS, Duke; PhD, Brown 

Emmett WiUard Hamrick (1952-1988) 
BA, UNC-Chapel Hill; PhD, Duke 

Phillip J. Hamrick Jr. (1956-1995) 
BS, Morris Harvey; PhD, Duke 

Carl V. Harris (1956-1989) 

BA, Wake Forest; BD, STM, Yale; PhD, Duke 

Lucille S. Harris (1957-1991) 
BA, BM, Meredith 

Elmer K. Hayashi (1973-2004) 

BA, Califorrua (Davis); MS, San Diego State; PhD, Illinois 

Roger A. Hegstrom (1969-2001) 
BA, St. Olaf; AM, PhD, Harvard 



Lecturer Emerita in SCTA 
(Theatre Arts) 

Wake Forest Professor Emerita of Romance Languages 

Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

Albritton Professor Emeritus of Religion 

Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

Professor Emeritus of Classical Languages 

Instructor Emerita in Music 



Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 



Robert M. Helm (1940-2002) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, Duke 

Marcus B. Hester (1963-2006) 

BA, Wake Forest; PhD, Vanderbilt 

David A. Hills (1960-1996) 
BA, Kansas; MA, PhD, Iowa 

George M. Holzwarth (1983-2004) 
BA, Wesleyan; MS, PhD, Harvard 

William L. Hottinger (1970-1996) 
BS, Slippery Rock; MS, PhD, Illinois 



Wake Forest Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

Worrell Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 

Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 

Professor Emeritus of Psychology 

Professor Emeritus of Physics 

Professor Emeritus of Health and Exercise Science 



294 



Delmer P. Hylton (1949-1991) 
BS, MBA, Indiana 



Mordecai J. Jaffe (1980-1998) 

BS, City College (New York); PhD, Cornell 

Patricia Adams Johansson (1969-1998) 

BA, Winston-Salem State; MA, Wake Forest 

Harry L. King Jr. (1960-1981) 

BA, Richmond; MA, PhD, UNC-Chapel HiU 

Lula M. Leake (1964-1997) 
BS, Louisiana State; 
MRE, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 

John H. Litcher (1973-2004) 

BS, Winona State; MA, PhD, Minnesota 

Robert W. Lovett (1962, 1968-2001) 
BA, Oglethorpe; MAT, PhD, Emory 

Milorad R. Margitic' (1978-2005) 

MA, Leiden (Netherlands); PhD, Wayne State 

*James A. Martin Jr. (1983-2003) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, Duke; PhD, Columbia 

Jill Jordan McMillan (1983-2006) 

BA, Baylor; MA, Arkansas; PhD, Texas 

Dolly A. McPherson (1974-2001) 

BA, Southern; MA, Boston University; PhD, Iowa 

Gordon A. Melson (1991-2006) 
BS, PhD, Sheffield (England) 

Carlton T. Mitchell (1961-1991) 
BA, Wake Forest; BD, Yale; 
STM, Union Theo. Seminary; PhD, New York 

Carl C. Moses (1964-1991) 

AB, William and Mary; MA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Thomas E. MuUen (1957-2000) 
BA, Rollins; MA, PhD, Emory 

John E. Parker Jr. (1950-1987) 

BA, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, Syracuse 

Philip J. Perricone (1967-2003) 
BS, MA, Florida; PhD, Kentucky 

Margaret R. Perry (1947-1998) 
BS, South Carolina 

Elizabeth Phillips (1957-1989) 

BA, UNC-Greensboro; MA, Iowa; PhD, Pennsylvania 

Lee Harris Potter (1965-1989) 
BA, MA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Herman J. Preseren (1953-1983) 

BS, Califorrua State (Pennsylvania); 
MA, Columbia; PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Gregory D. Pritchard (1968-1994) 

BA, Oklahoma Baptist; BD, Southern Baptist Theo. Seminary; 
PhD, Columbia 



Professor Emeritus of Accounting 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Professor Emeritus of Biology 



Associate Dean of the College Emerita 
and Lecturer Emerita in English 

Professor Emeritus of Romance Languages 

Associate Vice President for 
Academic Affairs Emerita 

Professor Emeritus of Education 

Professor Emeritus of English 

Professor Emeritus of Romance Langauges 

University Professor Emeritus 

Professor Emerita of Communication 

Professor Emerita of English 

Dean of the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences Emeritus 
and Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

Professor Emeritus of Religion 
Professor Emeritus of Politics 



Dean of the CoUege Emeritus and 
Professor Emeritus of History 

Professor Emeritus of Education 
and Romance Languages 

Professor Emeritus of Sociology 

Registrar Emerita 

Professor Emerita of English 

Professor Emeritus of English 

Professor Emeritus of Education 

Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 



*Died January 24, 2007 



295 



Beulah L. Raynor (1946-1979) 

BA, East Carolina; MA, Wake Forest 

J. Don Reeves (1967-1994) 

BA, Mercer; BD, ThM, Southern Baptist Theo. Seniinary; EdD, Columbia 

Charles L. Richman (1968-2006) 

BA, Virginia; MA, Yeshiva; PhD, Cincinnati 

Leonard P. Roberge (1974-2002) 

BA, New Hampshire; MA, Atlanta; EdD, Maine 

Mary Frances Robinson (1952-1989) 
BA, Wilson; MA, PhD, Syracuse 

*Paul S. Robinson (1952-1977) 

BA, Westminster; BM, Curtis; MSM, DSM, Union Seminary 

Eva M. Rodtwitt (1966-19^7) 
Cand Philol, Oslo (Norway) 

Wilmer D. Sanders (1954-1957, 1964-1992) 

BA, Muhlenberg; MA, PhD, Indiana 

John W. Sawyer (1956-1988) 

BA, MA, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, Missouri 

Richard D. Sears (1964-2002) 
BA, Clark; MA, PhD, Indiana 

Ben M. Seelbinder (1959-1988) 

BA, Mississippi Delta State; MA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Timothy F. Sellner (1970-2003) 

BA, PhD, Michigan; MA, Wayne State 

Dudley Shapere (1984-2002) 
BA, MA, PhD, Harvard 

Howard W. Shields (1958-2001) 

BS, UNC-Chapel Hill; MS, Pennsylvania State; PhD, Duke 

Robert N. Shorter (1958-1999) 
BA, Union; MA, PhD, Duke 



Michael L. Sinclair (1968-2006) 

BA, Wake Forest; AM, PhD, Stanford 

Blanche C. Speer (1972-1984) 

BA, Howard Payne; MA, PhD, Colorado 

Henry Smith Stroupe (1937-1984) 
BS, MA, Wake Forest; PhD, Duke 

Thomas C. Taylor (1971-2003) 
BS, MA, UNC-Chapel Hill; 
PhD, Louisiana State 

Harold C. Tedford (1965-1998) 

BA, Ouachita; MA, Arkansas; PhD, Louisiana State 

Stanton K. Tefft (1964-2000) 

BA, Michigan State; MS, Wisconsin; PhD, Minnesota 

Anne S. Tillett (1956-1986) 

BA, Carson-Newman; MA, Vanderbilt; 
PhD, Northwestern 

George W. Trautwein (1983-1996) 

BMus, Oberlin; MMus, Cleveland Institute; MusD, Indiana 



Associate Professor Enierita of English 

Professor Emeritus of Education 

Professor Emeritus of Psychology 

Professor Emeritus of Education 

Professor Emerita of Romance Languages 

Professor Emeritus of Music 

Lecturer Emerita in Romance Languages 

Professor Emeritus of German 

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 
and Computer Science 

Professor Emeritus of Political Science 

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

Professor Emeritus of German 

Reynolds Professor Emeritus 
of Philosophy and History of Science 

Professor Emeritus of Physics 

Professor Emeritus of English 

Professor Emeritus of History 

Associate Professor Emerita of Linguistics 

Dean of the Graduate School Emeritus 
and Professor Emeritus of History 

Professor Emeritus of Accountancy 
(W. Calloway School of Business and Accountancy) 

Professor Emeritus of Theatre 

Professor Emeritus of Anthropology 

Professor Emerita of Romance Languages 



Director of Instrumental Ensembles Emeritus 
(Department of Music) 



*Died February 15, 2007 



296 



Marcellus E. Waddill (1962-1997) 

BA, Hampden-Sydney; MA, PhD, Pittsburgh 

J. Van Wagstaff (1964-1992) 

BA, Randolph-Macon; MBA, Rutgers; PhD, Virginia 

David S. Weaver (1977-2002) 

BA, MA, Arizona; PhD, New Mexico 

George P Williams Jr. (1958-1999) 

BS, Richmond; MS, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

John G. Williard (1958-1994) 
BS, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Edwin G. Wilson (1951-2002) 

BA, Wake Forest, AM, PhD, Harvard 

Donald H. Wolfe (1968-2000) 

BS, MS, Southern Illinois; PhD, Cornell 

J. Ned Woodall (1969-2003) 

BA, MA, Texas; PhD, Southern Methodist 

Raymond L. Wyatt (1956-1992) 

BS, Wake Forest; MA, PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

*W. Buck Yearns Jr. (1945-1988) 

BA, Duke; MA, Georgia; PhD, UNC-Chapel HiU 

Richard L. Zuber (1962-2000) 

BS, Appalachian; MA, Emory; PhD, Duke 

*Died November 16, 2006 



Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

Professor Emeritus of Economics 

Professor Emeritus of Anthropology 

Professor Emeritus of Physics 

Vice President and Treasurer Emeritus 

Provost Emeritus and Professor Emeritus of English 

Professor Emeritus of Theatre 

Professor Emeritus of Anthropology 

Professor Emeritus of Biology 

Professor Emeritus of History 

Professor Emeritus of History 



297 



The Committees of the Faculty 




The Committees listed represent those in effect diiring the academic year 2006-07. Each 
committee selects its own chair except where the chair is designated. Dates noted are year 
of term expiration. 

Executive Committees 

The Committee on Academic Affairs. Non-voting: Dean of student services, associate deans of the 
College, and one undergraduate student. Voting: Dean of the College; dean of the Wayne CaUoway 
School of Business and Accountancy; 2009 Natalie Holzwarth, Miles Silman; 2008 Judy Kem, James 
Powell; 2007 Edward Allen, James Norris; and one undergraduate student. 

The Committee on Admissions. Non-voting: Director of admissions, two members from the administra- 
tive staff of the Office of the Dean of the College, and one undergraduate student. Voting: Dean of the 
College; 2009 Robert Evans, Jeff Holdridge; 2008 Ronald Dimock, Helga Welsh; 2007 David Faber, 
Kathy Kron; and one vmdergraduate student. 

The Committee on Scholarships and Student Aid. Non-voting: One undergraduate student. Voting: Dean 
of the College, director of financial aid, two members from the administrative staff of the Office of 
the Dean of the College; 2009 Grant McAllister, Olga Valbuena-Hanson; 2008 David Anderson, Brian 
Tague; 2007 Clay Hipp, Teresa Radomski; and one undergraduate student. 

The Committee on Curriculum. Voting: Provost, dean of the College, dean of the Wayne CaUoway 
School of Business and Accountancy, registrar, and the chairs of each department of the CoUege as 
follows: Division I. (Humanities) Education, History, Military Science, Philosophy, Religion. Divi- 
sion II. (Humanities and Literature) Classical Languages, English, German, Romance Languages, 
East Asian Languages and Cultures. Division III. (Humanities and Fine Arts) Art, Music, Theatre 
and Dance. Division IV. (Social and Behavioral Sciences) Anthropology, Communication, Economics, 
Political Science, Psychology, Sociology. Division V. (Natural Science, Mathematics, and Computer 
Science) Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Health and Exercise Science, Mathematics, Physics. 

Advisory Committees 

The Committee on Academic Planning. Non-voting: Provost, dean of the Wayne Calloway School of 
Business and Accountancy, and one undergraduate student. Voting: Dean of the CoUege, director of 
the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, one undergraduate student, and 2010 Win-Chiat Lee, Mary Pend- 
ergraft; 2009 James SchirUlo, Alan WUhams; 2008 Margaret Smith; 2007 Hugh Howards; and one 
undergraduate student. 

The Committee on Athletics. Non-voting: Director of athletics and one undergraduate student. Voting: 
Vice president for investments and tieasurer, dean of the College, faculty representative to the Atlan- 
tic Coast Conference; one undergraduate student; and 2011 Mary Dalton, David Levy; 2010 Stewart 
Carter, Charles Kennedy; 2009 Carole Browne, Michael Lawlor; 2008 Ralph Kennedy, David Levy; 
2007 Mary Friedman, Charles KimbaU; and one undergraduate student. 

The Committee on Nominations. Voting: 2009 Donald Frey, Catherine Harris, Gale Sigal; 2008 Anne 
Boyle, Claudia Kairoff; 2007 Margaret Smith, Kline Harrison. 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 



298 



The Committee on Library Planning. Non-voting: Provost, dean of the Graduate School, one under- 
graduate student, and one graduate student. Voting: One faculty representative from each academic 
division of the College, dean of the College, one faculty representative from the Wayne Calloway 
School of Business and Accountancy, the director of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, one undergradu- 
ate student, and one graduate student. 2010 Sol Miguel-Prendes, 2009 Robert Knott, Margaret Bender; 

2008 Michael Hughes; 2007 Todd Torgersen, Betsy Hoppe. 

The Committee on Information Technology. Non-voting: Provost, dean of the Graduate School, vice 
president for student life and instructional resources, vice president administration, and one under- 
graduate student. Voting: Dean of the College or the dean's designate, dean of the Wayne Calloway 
School of Business and Accountancy or the dean's designate, the director of the Z. Smith Reynolds 
Library, a representative from Information Systems, one undergraduate student, and six elected 
members of the undergraduate faculties, including at least one from each of the five academic divi- 
sions of the College. 2009 Jonathan Christman, Wei-chin Lee; 2008 Paul Escott, Luis Gonzales; 
2007 William Marcum, Stan Thomas. 

The Committee on First-Year Seminars. Non-voting: Dean of freshmen. Voting: Dean of the College, and 

2009 Jennifer Burg, Kline Harrison; 2008 Bernadine Barnes, Robert Whaples; 2007 Mary Friedman, 
Leah McCoy. 

Special Committees 

The Committee on Publications. Voting: Dean of the College, vice president for investments and trea- 
surer, director of creative services, three faculty advisers of the Old Gold and Black, The Student, and 
the Howler; and 2009 Peter Kairoff, Allan Louden; 2008 Sheri Bridges, Ronald Noftle; 2007 Scott Klein, 
Howell Smith. 

The Committee for Teacher Education. Voting: Dean of the College, dean of the Graduate School, chair 
of the Department of Education; and 2009 Claire Hammond, David Wilson; 2008 George Graham, 
Brian Gorelick; 2007 Simone Caron, Gary Miller. 

The Committee for the ROTC. Voting: Dean of the College, ROTC coordinator, professor of military sci- 
ence; and 2009 Edwin Hendricks; 2008 Robert Utley; 2007 Randall Regan. 

The Committee on Orientation and Lower Division Advising. The dean of freshmen, the chair of 
Orientation and Lower Division Advising (who shall serve as chair), individuals designated by the 
vice president for student life and instructional resources to represent the division of student life, 
the president of student goverrunent or his or her designate, at least six members from the College 
and the Wayne Calloway School of Business and Accountancy faculties, to be invited by the chair in 
consultation with the Nominations Committee, to serve renewable four-year terms, and other persoris 
from the administration and student body whom the chair shall invite to serve. A majority of the 
committee shall be composed of members of the College and the Wayne Calloway School of Business 
and Accountancy faculties. 2006-07 Chair, Jay Ford. 

The Committee on Open Curriculum. Dean of the College, the coordinator of the Open Curriculum 
Program and members of the faculty who are appointed as Open Curriculum advisers. 2006-07 Chair, 
Barry Maine. 

The Committee on the Teaching and Learning Center. Six elected members of the faculty, one from each 
of the five academic divisions of the College and one from the Wayne Calloway School of Business 
and Accountancy; 2009 Sarah Barbour, Gordon McCray; 2008 Sharon Andrews, Peter Siavelis; 2007 
Patricia Cunningham, Angela King. 



299 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 



Joint Faculty/ Administration Committees 

The Joint Admissions Committee. Dean of the College, director of admissions, provost, and three fac- 
ulty members of the Committee on Admissions. 

Otiier Committees on wKiich the Faculty Enjoys Representation 

The Committee on Capital Planning. Non-voting: Provost, vice president for investments and treasurer, 
vice president for administration, and one undergraduate student. Voting: Dean of the College, dean 
of the Wayne Calloway School of Business and Accountancy, one undergraduate student; and 2010 
Michael Lawlor, Ralph Tower; 2009 Ananda Mitra, Gale Sigal, Robert Ulery; 2008 Charles Kennedy, 
Sarah Watts; 2007 Mary Wayne-Thomas. 

The Judicial Council. Administration: 2011 Kenneth A. Zick; 2010 William S. Hamilton, Toby Hale. 
Faculty. 2011 Barry Maine; 2010 Ellen Kirkman, Mary Lynn Redmond; 2009, Simone Caron; 
2008 James Curran; 2007 Clay Hipp, Richard Heard; and three undergraduate students. 

The Committee on Student Life. Dean of the College or the dean's designate, dean of student services, 
a designated member of the administration; 2009 Peter Siavelis; 2008 J.K. Curry; 2007 Helen Akinc; 
and three undergraduate students. 

Members of the Honor and Ethics Council. 2009 Susan Borwick, Sally Barbour, Scott Klein; 2008 Sylvain 
Boko, John Dinan, Donna Henderson, James Norris; 2007 Mary DeShazer, Michael Hyde, Deborah 
Newsome, Robert Utley. 

Faculty Marshals. Douglas Beets, Mary Foskett, Don Prey, Miaohua Jiang, John Llewelljm, 
Stephen Robinson. 

University Senate. President, seruor vice president, the deans of the several schools, the associate dean 
of the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, the director of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, the 
secretary of the Uruversity, and, with the consent of the Senate, any person holding the position of 
vice president of the University or equivalent rank, and six staff representatives from the School of 
Medicine and the College, and the following: 

Representatives of the College. 2010 Anne Boyle, Bill Conner, Michele Gillespie; 2009 David 
Coates, Natalie Holzwarth, Barry Maine; 2008 Andrew Ettin, Dilip Kondepudi, James Kuz- 
manovich; 2007 Katy Harriger, Harry Titus, David Weinstein. 

Representatives of the Wayne Calloway School of Business and Accountancy. 2008 Dale Martin; 

2007 Sheri Bridges; 2006 Yvonne Hinson. 

Representatives of the Graduate School. 2010 Michael Robbins; 2009 Kathleen Kron; 

2008 Suzi Torti. 

Representatives of the School of Law. 2010 Wendy Parker; 2009 Tim Davis; 2008 Simone Rose. 

Representatives of the Babcock Graduate School of Management. 2010, Derrick Boone; 

2009 Bobby Lamy; 2008 Michelle Roehm. 

Representatives of the Wake Forest School of Medicine. 2010 Edward Haponik; 2009 Michelle 
Naughton; 2008 Cormac O'Donovan; 2007 Amy McMichael, Joseph Tobin, Ronald Zagoria. 

Representatives of the Divinity School. 2007 Neal Walls. 

Institutional Review Board. Steven Folmar (chair), Nancy Crouch, Robert Evans, Michael Hazen, 
Anthony Marsh, Batja Mesquita, Deborah Newsome, Robert Sanches-Langston (community repre- 
sentative), Joseph Soares. Alternatives: Steven Giles, Janine Jennings, Patricia Nixon, Paul Thatcher, 
Laura Veach. 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 3Q0 



Enrollment 




All Schools— Fall 2006 

Undergraduate Schools 
The Graduate School (Reynolda Campus) 
The Graduate School (Bowman Gray Campus) 
The School of Law 
Divinity School 

Babcock Graduate School of Management 
The Wake Forest School of Medicine 
(Includes Allied Health) 

University Totals 



Men 



Women 



Total 



2,133 


2,188 


4,321 


190 


247 


437 


120 


161 


281 


283 


198 


481 


53 


51 


104 


376 


145 


521 


285 


309 


594 



3,440 



3,299 



6,739 



Geographic Distribution — Undergraduates 

By State (2006-07 Academic Year) 



Alabania 


47 


Kentucky 


52 


North Dakota 





Alaska 


1 


Louisiana 


15 


Ohio 


136 


Arizona 


12 


Maine 


10 


Oklahoma 


9 


Arkansas 


3 


Maryland 


222 


Oregon 


8 


California 


83 


Massachusetts 


168 


Pennsylvania 


256 


Colorado 


37 


Michigan 


22 


Rhode Island 


12 


Connechcut 


135 


Minnesota 


15 


South Carolina 


125 


Delaware 


16 


Mississippi 


2 


South Dakota 


1 


District of Colimibia 


14 


Missouri 


20 


Termessee 


112 


Florida 


244 


Montana 


4 


Texas 


176 


Georgia 


224 


Nebraska 


3 


Utah 


5 


Hawaii 


1 


Nevada 


2 


Vermont 


9 


Idaho 


4 


New Hampshire 


25 


Virginia 


248 


Illinois 


68 


New Jersey 


276 


Washington 


19 


Indiana 


30 


New Mexico 


4 


West Virginia 


21 


Iowa 


7 


New York 


200 


Wisconsin 


20 


Kansas 


23 


North Carolina 


1,105 


Wyoming 


5 



Countries Represented (2006-07 Academic Year) 

Bolivia Japan 

Canada Kenya 



Columbia 

France 

Germany 

Ghana 

India 



Korea 

Kuwait 

Malawi 

Malaysia 

Netherlands 



Poland 

Russia 

Saudi Arabia 

Slovenia 

Sri Lanka 

Taiwan 

United Kingdom 



International Students: 50 



301 



ENROLLMENT 



^^^^ Governing and Advisory Boards 



The Board of Trustees 

2003-2007 

W. Louis Bissette Jr., Asheville, NC 

Ronald E. Deal, Hickory, NC 

Lisbeth C. Evans, Winston-Salem, NC 

Martin L. Garcia, Tampa, PL 

Marvin D. Gentry, King, NC 

James R. Helvey III, Win^ton-Salem, NC 

2004-2008 

Diana M. Adams, Bartlesville, OK 
Donna A. Boswell, Washington, DC 
Bobby R. Burchfield, McLean, VA 
J. Donald Cowan Jr., Raleigh, NC 
Murray C. Greason Jr., Winston-Salem, NC 
William B. Greene Jr, Gray, TN 

2005-2009 

David W. Dupree, Washington, DC 
A. Doyle Early Jr., High Point, NC 
Donald E. Flow, Winston-Salem, NC 
Robert E. Greene, Winston-Salem, NC 
James M. Hoak, Dallas, TX 
Theodore R. Meredith, Vero Beach, PL 

2009-2010 

Ranlet S. Bell, Winston-Salem, NC 
Simpson O. Brown Jr., Winston-Salem, NC 
Graham W. Denton Jr, Charlotte, NC 
Lawrence D. Hopkins, Winston-Salem, NC 
Susan M. Ivey, Winston-Salem, NC 
Joshua M. King, Winston-Salem, NC 

2006-2007 Student Trustee Joshua M. King 

Life Trustees 
James L. Becton, Augusta, GA 
Bert L. Bennett, Pfafftown, NC 
Louise Broyhill, Winston-Salem, NC 
Jan W. Calloway, Greenwich, CT 
C.C. Cameron, Charlotte, NC 
Charles W. Cheek, Greensboro, NC 
Egbert L. Davis Jr., Winston-Salem, NC* 
Victor I. Plow Jr., Winston-Salem, NC 
Jean H. Gaskin, Charlotte, NC 
Weston P. Hatfield, Winston-Salem, NC 
Harvey R. Holding, Ponte Vedra Beach, PL 

* Died November 10, 2006 
** Died ]anuary U, 2007 



Alice Kirby Horton, Hillsborough, NC 
Jeanette Wallace Hyde, Raleigh, NC 
Dee Hughes LeRoy, Charleston, SC 
Douglas P. Manchester, La JoUa, CA 
Andrew J. Schindler, Winston-Salem, NC 



James W. Judson Jr., Roswell, GA 
Deborah D. Lambert, Raleigh, NC 
William L. Marks, New Orleans, LA 
Celeste Mason Pittman, Rocky Mount, NC 
Charles Jeffrey Young, Winston-Salem, NC 



L. Glenn Orr Jr, Winston-Salem, NC 
Michael G. Queen, Wilmington, NC 
Deborah K. Rubin, Winston-Salem, NC 
Mitesh B. Shah, Atlanta, GA 



James W. Johnston, Mooresville, NC 
John R. Lowden, Greenwich, CT 
Harold O. Rosser, New Canaan, CT 
K. Wayne Smith, Newton, NC 
Janice K. Story, Atlanta, GA 



James E. Johnson Jr, Charlotte, NC 
Petro Kulynych, Wilkesboro, NC 
John G. Medlin Jr., Winston-Salem, NC 
Russell W. Meyer Jr., Wichita, KS 
Arnold D. Palmer, Youngstown, PA 
Prances P. Pugh, Raleigh, NC 
Zachary Smith, Winston-Salem, NC** 
D.E. Ward, Lumberton, NC 
Lonnie B. Williams, Wilmington, NC 
J. Tylee Wilson, Ponte Vedra Beach, PL 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



302 



Officers - 2006-2007 

L. Glenn Orr Jr., Winston-Salem, NC, Chair 

K. Wayne Snaith, Winston-Salem, NC, Vice Chair 

Louis R. Morrell, Winston-Salem, NC, Treasurer 

J. Reid Morgan, Winston-Salem, NC, Secretary 

Anita M. Conrad, Winston-Salem, NC, Assistant Secretary 

The Board of Visitors 

Bob Lee, Chair, Board of Visitors 

Wake Forest College and Graduate School 



Terms Expiring June 30, 2007 

Bruce M. Babcock, Winston-Salem, NC 
Callie Anne Clark, Hinsdale, IL 
Brenda E.B. Dunson, Washington, DC 
Gloria Graham, Winston-Salem, NC 
Robert R Lee, Darien, CT 

Terms Expiring June 30, 2008 

Debra Bryant, Keswick, VA 

John Crowe, Davis, CA 

Sarah duPont, Charlottesville, VA 

Ashley Hairston, Charlottesville, VA 

Rhoda Juckett, Charlotte, NC 

Page Laughlin, Winston-Salem, NC 

Jack Lowden, Greenwich, CT 

Terms Expiring June 30, 2009 

Pete Daniel, Washington, DC 

Robert M. Frehse Jr., New York, NY 

John Geissinger, Darien, CT 

Maximo M. Gomez, Briarcliff Manor, NY 

Olivia Britton Holding, Raleigh, NC 

Terms Expiring June 30, 2010 

Scott Bihl, New Canaan, CT 
Jane Crosthwaite, South Hadley, MA 
Trish Cuimingham, Natural Bridge, VA 
Michael Gunter, Lewisville, NC 
George Hundley, Wyrmewood, PA 



Debra Lee, Darien, CT 
James A. Perdue, Salisbury, MD 
Zachary Tate, Blowing Rock, NC 
William L. Thorkelson, Rosemont, PA 
John W. Wagster, Nashville, TN 



Toby Moffett, Washington, DC 

Joe Neal, Seattle, WA 

Gail Smith, Belville, NC 

Cathy Thomas, Chapel Hill, NC 

Betsy Tuttle-Newhall, Chapel Hill, NC 

Joy Vermillion Heinsohn, Winston-Salem, NC 

Mary Helen Young, Malibu, CA 



David B. O'Maley, Cincinnati, OH 
Karen G. O'Maley, Cincinnati, OH 
Deborah Shively, Malvern, PA 
Glen Shively, Malvern, PA 
David R Shouvlin, Hilliard, OH 



Mark Leuchtenberger, Cambridge, MA 

Marc Miller, Chicago, IL 

Keith Vaughan, Winston-Salem, NC 

Pam Wozniak, Charlotte, NC 

Ted Wosniak, Charlotte, NC 



Ex-Officio Members 

Donna Boswell, Trustee Liaison, Washington, DC 



303 



BOARD OF VISITORS 



The Board of Visitors 



Wayne Calloway School of Business and Accountancy 2006-07 



Patrick James Brady, Atlanta, GA 
Janice W. Calloway, Greenwich, CT 
Robert E. Chappell, Horsham, PA 
Timothy P Cost, Philadelphia, PA 
Christopher K. Cotton, Charlotte, NC 
P. Michael Crowley, Glen AUen, VA 
Victor N. Daley, Branchville, NJ 
Edwin A. Dalrymple Jr., Charlotte, NC 
David C. Darnell, Charlotte, NC 
Jonathan J. Davies, Washington, DC 
John P. Davis, Weston, CT 
Randall T. Duncan, Atlanta, GA 
Frederick W. Eubank, Charlotte, NC 
Thomas A. Fassett, Charlotte, NC 
John J. Fosina, Plainsboro, NJ 
Donna Galer, Raleigh, NC 
Thomas P Gibbons, New York, NY 
Jessica B. Good, Clemmons, NC 
Dennis G. Hatchell, Winston-Salem, NC 
William R Hickey New York, NY 
Stephen L. Holcombe, High Point, NC 
G. Thomas Hough, Atlanta, GA 
Gregory B. Hunter, Winston-Salem, NC 
A. Dale Jenkins, Raleigh, NC 
M. Benjamin Jones, New York, NY 
Patrick G. Jones, Atlanta, GA 
Davin E. Juckett, Charlotte, NC 
Gregory M. Keeley, New York, NY 
John H. Keener, Charlotte, NC 



Bradley D. Kendall, Lawrenceville, GA 
Mary L. Kesel, Winston-Salem, NC 
Edward A. Leinss, Atlanta, GA 
John B. Maier II, Washington, DC 
Morris D. Marley, Winston-Salem, NC 
Aubrey L. Martin, Atlanta, GA 
Kimberly D. McCaslin, McLean, VA 
G. Whitfield McDowell, Charlotte, NC 
Caroline M. McMahon, Raleigh, NC 
Charles L. Melman, Charlotte, NC 
George F. Mikes, New York, NY 
Katherine S. Napier, Hinsdale, IL 
Thomas G. Ondrof, Charlotte, NC 
Charles E. Rawley III, Louisville, KY 
Scott E. Reed, Winston-Salem, NC 
Robert L. Reid, Charlotte, NC 
Richard A. Riley, Chicago, IL 
William T. Riley Jr., Balfimore, MD 
Gilbert J. Roberts, Sebastopol, CA 
Jose Ramon Rodriguez, Miami, FL 
Harold O. Rosser, New York, NY 
Robert H. Samson, Albany, NY 
Kenneth C Sharp, Charlotte, NC 
Clay G. Small, Piano, TX 
Cynthia Evans Tessien, Winston-Salem, NC 
Robert W. Thorbum, Raleigh, NC 
C. Jeffery Triplette, Charlotte, NC 
Mark A. Tullis, Atlanta, GA 



BOARD OF VISITORS 



304 



The Administration 



Years following name indicate year of hire/year of appointment to current position. 




University 

Nathan O. Hatch (2005, 2005) 

AB, Wheaton College; AM, PhD, Washington (St. Louis) 

Richard H. Dean (1986, 1998) 
BA, Virginia Military Institute; 
MD, Medical College of Virginia 

William C. Gordon (2002, 2002) 

BA, MA, Wake Forest; PhD, Rutgers 

William B. Applegate (1999, 2002) 
BA, MD, Louisville; 
MPH, Harvard 

James R. Bullock (1985, 2006) 
BA, MBA, Wake Forest 

Matthew S. Cullinan (2006, 2006) 
BA, PhD Notre Dame; MA, Duke 

Douglas L. Edgeton (2000, 2000) 
BS, Alabama (Tuscaloosa); 
MBA, MPH, Alabama (Birmingham) 

James Reid Morgan (1979, 2002) 
BA, JD, Wake Forest 

Louis R. Morrell (1995, 1995) 

BS, Babson College; MBA, Massachusetts 

Nancy D. Suttenfield (2006, 2006) 

BS, Indiana University of Peruisylvania; 
MA, Virginia Commonwealth 

Kenneth A. Zick (1975, 1989) 

BA, Albion; JD, Wayne State; MLS, Michigan 



President 

Senior Vice President for Health Affairs 

and President, Wake Forest University 

Health Sciences 

Provost 

Dean, School of Medicine and 

Senior Vice President, Wake Forest Uruversity 

Health Sciences 

Vice President for University Advancement 

Vice President for Administration 

Senior Vice President for 
Health Affairs, Finance and Administration 

Vice President and General Counsel 

Vice President for Investments 
and Treasurer 

Seruor Vice President and Chief Financial Officer 



Vice President for Student Life and 
Instructional Resources 



College 

Deborah L. Best (1972, 2004) 

BA, MA, Wake Forest; PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Linda McKinnish Bridges (2001, 2001) 
BA, Meredith College; 

PhD, MDiv, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
MBA, Wake Forest 

TobyA. Hale (1970, 1997) 

BA, Wake Forest; MDiv, Duke; EdD, Indiana 

William S. Hamilton (1983, 1983) 
BA, MA, PhD, Yale 



Dean of the College 
Associate Dean 



Associate Dean and 
Dean of the Summer Sessions 

Associate Dean 



305 



ADMINISTRATION 



Paul N. Orser (1989, 1993) 

BS, Wake Forest; MS, PhD, Emory 

W. Douglas Bland (1975, 2000) 
BA, MA, Wake Forest 

Jane H. Caldwell (1999, 1999) 

BA, UNC-Greensboro; MA, Wake Forest 

Provost 

William C. Gordon (2002, 2002) 

BA, MA, Wake Forest; PhD, Rutgers 

Samuel T. Gladding (1990, 1998) 
BA, MAEd, Wake Forest; 
MA, Yale; PhD, UNC-Greensboro 

Mark Welker (1987, 2004) 

BS, UNC-Chapel Hill; PhD, Florida State 

Graduate School 

CeciUa H. Solano (1977, 1999) 

BA, Harvard; MA, PhD, Johns Hopkins 

School of Law 

Robert K. Walsh (1989, 1989) 
BA, Providence; JD, Harvard 

H. Miles Foy III (1984, 2000) 
BA, UNC-Chapel Hill; 
MA, Harvard; JD, Virginia 

Ann Setien Gibbs (2000, 2000) 
BS, Virginia; JD, Richmond 

Susan Montaquila (1988, 2006) 

BA, UNC-Chapel Hill; JD, Wake Forest 

Marian F. Parker (1999, 2002) 

BA, UNC-Greensboro; JD, Wake Forest; 
MSLS, UNC-Chapel Hill 

James C. Cook (1992, 1992) 

BS, South Carolina; JD, Wake Forest 

jam M. Fields (2001, 2001) 
BS, Southwestern Louisiana 

Jean K. Holmes (1985, 1989) 

Margaret C. Lankford (1990, 1990) 
BS, UNC-Greensboro 

Melanie E. Nutt (1969, 1984) 

Edward S. Raliski (1988, 1999) 
BA, Wake Forest 

LeAnn P Steele (1977, 1987) 
BMu, Salem 

Linda J. Taylor (1983, 1985) 
BS, UNC-Greensboro 



Associate Dean and Dean of Freshmen 

Associate Athletic Director and 
Assistant to the Dean of the College 

Director of Academic Counseling 

for Student-Athlete Services and 

Assistant to the Dean of the CoUege 

Provost 
Associate Provost 



Associate Provost for Research 

Interim Dean of the Graduate School 

Dean of the School of Law 
Executive Associate Dean, Academic Affairs 

Associate Dean for Administrative and Student Services 

Assistant Dean for the International Graduate Program 

Associate Dean for Information Services, 

Director of Professional Center Library, 

and Professor of Law 

Director of Continuing Legal Education 

Director of Career Services 

Activities Coordinator 
Budget Director 

Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 
Director of Law School Information Services 

Registrar 

Director of Professional and Public Relations 



ADMINISTRATION 



306 



Babcock Graduate School of Management 



Ajay Patel (1993, 2004) 
BS, St. Joseph's College; 
MBA, Baltimore; PhD, Georgia 

J. Kendall Middaugh II (1987, 1999) 

BBA, George Washington; PhD, Ohio State 

Timothy L. Smunt (1994, 2006) 

BS, Purdue; MBA, Missouri; PhD, Indiana 

Nathaniel Irvin II (2001, 2001) 
BA, MA, South Carolina; 
DMA, North Texas 

Daniel S. Fogel (2003, 2003) 
BS, MA, Pennsylvania State; 
PhD, Wisconsin 

Kevin C. Bender (1999, 2006) 

BS, Alleghany College; MBA, Wake Forest 

Jamie Barnes (1998, 1998) 

AA, Wesley, Delaware; MBA Wake Forest 

Debbie Cox (1997, 2002) 

BS, Radford; MBA, Wake Forest 

Andy Dreyfuss (2003, 2004) 
BS, Santa Clara 

Leslye A. Gervasi (1997, 1997) 

BS, Nazareth College; MA, State Uruversity of New York 

Concette E. Grillo (2005, 2005) 
BA, Wellesley; MBA, Cornell 

John Owen (1996, 1999) 
BS, Wake Forest 

Stacy P Owen (1999, 2003) 
BS, MS, NC State 



Dean and 
Babcock Research Professor of Finance 

Associate Dean of Management Education 

Associate Dean for Faculty 

Assistant Dean for MBA Student Development 

Assistant Dean and Dean of Charlotte Program 

Director of MBA Recruitment 

Director of Evening and Executive 
MBA Programs — Winston-Salem 

Director of Finance and Administration 

Director of the Career Management Center 

Director, MBA Program — Charlotte 

Director of Marketing 

Director of Information Technology 

Director, Full-time MBA Program 
and Student Affairs 



Wake Forest School of Medicine 

Richard H. Dean (1986, 1998) 

BA, Virginia Military Institute; MD, Medical College of Virginia 

William B. Applegate (1999, 2002) 
BA, MD, LouisvUle; 
MPh, Harvard School of Public Health 



President and Chief Executive Officer 



Seruor Vice President and Dean 



Douglas L. Edgeton (2000, 2000) 
BS, Alabama (Tuscaloosa); 
MBA, MPH, Alabama (Birmingham) 

Patricia L. Adams (1979, 2005) 
BA, Duke; MD, Wake Forest 

G. Douglas Atkinson (1994, 1994) 
BS, Drake; MBA, Xavier 

Steven M. Block (1983, 2004) 

MB, BCh, University of Witwatersran (South Africa) 



Seruor Vice President for Finance and Adniinistration 

and Chief Operations Officer and 

Interim Senior Vice President and Executive Director 

Piedmont Triad Research Park 



Chief of Professional Services 

Vice President for Networks 

Associate Dean for Faculty Services 
and Career Development 



307 



ADMINISTRATION 



Johannes M. Boehme II (1978, 1990) Associate Dean for Acadeniic Computing 

BA, Southern College; MBA, Wake Forest; and Information Services 

PhD, Western 

Karen H. Huey (1997, 2006) Interim Vice President for 

BED, Texas A&M Facilities Planning and Construction 

J. Mac Ernest III (1982, 2005) Associate Dean for Student Services 

BA, William Carey College; MD, Mississippi 

Denise Fetters (1998, 1998) Associate Vice President for Wake Forest University 

BS, Washington National Physicians Business Operations 

Michael L. Freeman (1993, 2001) Vice President for Strategic Planning 

BS, Bradley; MBA, lov^^a 

Terry L. Hales Jr. (1996, 2002) Vice President for Financial Plarming 

BS, Appalachian State; MBA, Wake Forest and Chief Financial Officer 

Ronald L. Hoth (1992, 1992) Vice President for Human Resources 

BS, Loyola College — 

Ann Lambros (2000, 2005) ^ Assistant Dean for Education 

BS, UNC-Chapel HUl; MEd, PhD, UNC-Greensboro 

Brenda Latham-Sadler (1990, 2002) Assistant Dean for Student Services, 

BS, Pace; MD, Wake Forest Director, Diversity and Development Initiatives 

Douglas E. Lischke (1999, 2003) Controller 

BA, Georgia Southern; MBA, Valdosta State (Georgia) 

Michael R Lischke (2000, 2001) Director, Northwest AHEC 

BA, MPh, Emory; EdD, Temple 

Paul M. LoRusso (1987, 1987) Vice President for Information Services 

BS, Syracuse; MBA, Florida State 

Paula M. Means (2004, 2004) Assistant Dean for Research 

BS, Kent State; MPA, Roosevelt 

Laurie Molloy (1998, 2004) Assistant Dean for Resource Management 

BS, St. Cloud State (Minnesota); MBA, Wake Forest 

Lewis H. Nelson III (1976, 1985) Associate Dean for 

BS, NC State; MD, Wake Forest Medical Student Admissions 

K. Patrick Ober (1979, 2002) Associate Dean for Education 

BS, Michigan State; 
MD, University of Florida College of Medicine 

Patricia H. Petrozza (1984, 2001) Associate Dean for Graduate Medical Education 

BS, Chestnut Hill College; 
MD, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson 

Norman H. Potter, Jr. (2005, 2005) Vice President for Development 

BS, Perm State and Alumni Affairs 

Joanne Ruhland (1988, 1988) Associate Vice President for 

BS, Gardner Webb; MBA, Appalachian State Governmental Relations 

Sally A. Shumaker (1990, 2004) Associate Dean for Research 

BA, Wayne State; MA, PhD, Michigan 

Rick C. Weavil (1985, 2002) Associate Vice President 

BS, UNC-Chapel Hill for Wake Forest University Physicians Finance 

E. Parks Welch III (1991, 2000) Director, Coy C. Carpenter Library 

BS, UNC-Chapel Hill; MBA, Wake Forest; 
MLS, UNC-Greensboro 



ADMINISTRATION 



308 



Wayne Calloway School of Business and Accountancy 



Jack E. Wilkerson Jr. (1989, 1997) 
BS, Bob Jones; PhD, Texas 

J. Kline Harrison (1990, 1999) 
BS, Virginia; PhD, Maryland 

Gordon E. McCray (1994, 2002) 

BS, Wake Forest; MBA, Stetson; PhD, Florida State 

Helen Akinc (1987, 1999) 

BA, UNC-Chapel Hill; MBA, SUNY (Binghamton) 

Katherine S. Hoppe (1993, 1996) 
BA, Duke; MBA, Texas Christian; 
PhD, UNC-Greensboro 

Yvonne L. Hinson (1997, 2006) 

BS, MBA, UNC-Charlotte; PhD, Tennessee 



Dean of the Wayne Calloway School 
of Business and Accountancy 

Associate Dean 

Associate Dean 

Assistant Dean for 
Student Professional Affairs 

Assistant Dean for Student Academic Affairs 



Director of Graduate Studies 



Divinity School, Wake Forest University 

BUI J. Leonard (1996, 1996) 
BA, Texas Wesleyan; 
MDiv., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary; PhD, Boston 

Ginny Bridges Ireland (2004, 2005) 
BS, Georgia Southern; 
MRE, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Jill Crainshaw (1999, 2002) 
BA, Wake Forest; 

MDiv, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
PhD, Union Theological Seminary 

Donna K. Haley (2002, 2002) 

BS, Mercer; MBA, Georgia College & State 



Dean of the Divinity School 



Director of Admissions 



Associate Dean for 
the Master of Divinity Program 



Registrar of the Divinity School 



Administration 

Matthew S. Cullinan (2006, 2006) 

BS, Notre Dame; MA, Duke; PhD, Notre Dame 

Connie L. Carson (1986, 2006) 

BS, MEd, NC State; MBA, Wake Forest 

Jay L. Dorrunick (1991, 1996) 

BS, UNC-Chapel Hill; MA, Georgetown; 
MBA, Wake Forest; PhD, UNC-Chapel HiU 

William C. Sides Jr. (1994, 1994) 
BS, NC State 

J. Michael Tesh (2007, 2007) 
BA, Stetson; MBA, Campbell 



Vice President for Administration 

Assistant Vice President 
for Campus Services and Planning 

Assistant Vice President for Information Systems 
and Chief Information Officer 

Director of Facilities Management 

Assistant Vice President for Human Resources 



Admissions and Financial Aid 

Martha Blevins Alhnan (1982, 2001) 
BA, MBA, Wake Forest 

Tamara L. Blocker (1999, 2001) 

BS, Florida State; MA, Central Florida 



Director of Admissions 
Senior Associate Director of Admissions 



309 



ADMINISTRATION 



Arron Marlowe-Rogers (2002, 2006) 
BS, JD, Wake Forest 

Hattie L. Mukombe (2006, 2006) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Dawn E. Calhoun (1999, 2006) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Tracy A. Smith (2006, 2006) 

BS, North Dakota State; JD, Wake Forest 

Allyson D. DUjohn (2006, 2006) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Jennifer P. Harris (2006, 2006) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Emily S. Hedgpeth (2005, 2'005) 
BA, Wake Forest 

John J. Toner (2006, 2006) 
BA, Wake Forest 

WilUam T. Wells (1997, 1997) 

BA, Wake Forest; MAT, MEd, UNC-Chapel HiU 

Thomas O. Phillips (1982, 2003) 

BA, MA, Wake Forest; PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Paul M. Gauthier (2003, 2003) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Milton W. King (1992, 1997) 
BA, MBA, Wake Forest 

Terri E. LeGrand (2005, 2005) 
BS, Iowa State; JD, Wake Forest 

Benjamin L. May (2002, 2005) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Janice W. Claybrook (2006, 2006) 

BA, UNC-Chapel HiU; MS, UNC-Greensboro 

J. Adam Holyfield (2002, 2006) 

AAS, Surry Community College; BS, Gardner- Webb 

Thomas P Benza (2006, 2006) 
BA, BS, Appalachian State 

Anis S. Ragland (2006, 2006) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Lisa A. Myers (1996, 2000) 

Athletics 

Ron Wellman (1992, 1992) 
BS, MS, Bowling Green State 

Barbara Walker (1999, 1999) 

BS, MAEd, Central Missouri State 

W. Douglas Bland (1975, 2000) 
BA, MA, Wake Forest 

Barry Faircloth (2001, 2002) 
BS, Wake Forest 



Associate Director of Admissions 

Coordinator of Multicultural Affairs 

Associate Director of Admissions 

Assistant Director of Admissions 

Admissions Counselor 

Admissions Counselor 

Admissions Counselor 

- _ . ^ Admissions Cour\selor 

Director of Financial Aid 

Director of Wake Forest Scholars 

Associate Director of Merit-Based Scholarships 

Associate Director of Financial Aid 

Assistant Director of Financial Aid 

Assistant Director of Financial Aid 

Assistant Director of Financial Aid 

Assistant Director of Financial Aid 

Financial Aid Counselor 

Scholarship Counselor 

Student Employment Coordinator 

Director of Athletics 

Senior Associate Athletic Director /SWA 

Associate Athletic Director for Administration 
and Assistant to the Dean of the College 

Associate Athletic Director for Development 



ADMINISTRATION 



310 



Craig Keilitz (1996, 2001) 

BS, Central Michigan; MA, Ohio 

Dwight Lewis (2000, 2000) 
BA, MA, Chicago State 

Dean Buchan (2000, 2000) 
BA, UNC-Wilmington 

Greg Collins (1997, 2002) 

BS, Kansas State; MA, Richmond 



Todd Hairston (2005, 2006) 

BS, Wake Forest; MSPH, Meharry Medical College; 
PhD, Florida State 

Dave Marniion (2001, 2002) 

BS, Wake Forest; MS, Florida State 

Rebecca Ward (1967, 2001) 



Career Services 

William C. Currin (1988, 1988) 

BA, Wake Forest; BD, Southeastern Baptist Theo. Seminary 

Carolyn A. Couch (1997, 2000) 

BS, Meredith College; MA, Appalachian State 

Patrick Sullivan (1997, 2000) 
BA, MBA, Wake Forest 

Shan Woolard (2001, 2001) 

BA, Salem CoUege; MS, UNC-Greensboro 



Chaplain's Office 

Timothy L. Auman (2003, 2003) 
BA, Wofford College; MDiv, Duke 

Rebecca G. Hartzog (1999, 1999) 



Associate Athletic Director for Marketing and Promotions 

Associate Athletic Director for Student- Athlete Services 

Assistant Athletic Director for Media Relations 

Assistant Athletic Director for Sports Medicine 

Assistant Athletic Director for Compliance 



Associate Athletic Director for Finance 

Associate Athletic Director for Special 
Projects and Human Resources 



Director of Career Services 

Associate Director of Career Services 

Assistant Director 

Assistant Director 

Chaplain 



Associate Chaplain and Baptist Campus Minister 



BA, Samford; MDiv, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 



Finance 



Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer 



Nancy D. Suttenfield (2006, 2006) 

BS, Indiana University of Pennsylvania; 
MA, Virginia Commonwealth 

Louis R. Morrell (1995, 1995) 

BS, Babson College; MBA, Massachusetts 

Maureen L. Carpenter (1997, 1997) 

BS, St. John Fisher College; MBA, Wake Forest 

Michele S. Phillips (2007, 2007) Associate Vice President for Budget and Financial Plarming 

BS, Pennsylvania; MBA, William and Mary 



Vice President for Investments 
and Treasurer 

Controller 



Graylyn International Conference Center 

John Wise (2002, 2002) 
BS, Wisconsin 

Scott Emerson (1995, 1995) 
BS, MBA, Appalachian State 



General Manager 
Manager of Finance and Administration 



311 



ADMINISTRATION 



Information Systems 



Jay L. Dominick (1991, 1996) 

BS, UNC-Chapel Hill; MA, Georgetown; 
MBA, Wake Forest; PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Nancy R. Crouch (1992, 2001) 

BA, Virginia Tech; MAEd, Wake Forest 

Anne Yandell Bishop (1981, 2001) 

BA, MA, UNC-Greensboro; MBA, Wake Forest 

R. Kriss Dinkins (1990, 2003) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Michael Todd Edwards (1995, 2003) 
BS, NC State; MBA, Wake Forest 

Kristine Giannell (2007, 2007) 
BS, Perm State 

Lynda Goff (1991, 2003) 

BA, Southern California (FuUerton) 

John D. Henderson (1998, 1999) 
BBA, Campbell 

C. Lee Norris (1995, 2003) 

BA, MA, South Carolina; MBA, Wake Forest 



Assistant Vice President for Information Systems 
and Chief Information Officer 

Assistant Chief Information Officer 

Director of Research and Development 

Director of Support and Outreach Services 

Director of Media Solutions 

Director of Software Solutions 

— ' Director of Technology Irutiatives 

Director of Administration 

Director of Information Technology Infrastructure 



Institutional Research 

Ross A. Griffith (1966, 1993) 

BS, Wake Forest; MEd, UNC-Greensboro 

Adam Shick (2001, 20061) 

BS, US Merchant Marine Academy; MA, Wake Forest 

Sara Gravitt (1996, 2006) 
BS, High Point 

Investments and Treasurer 

Louis R. Morrell (1995, 1995) 

BS, Babson College; MBA, Massachusetts 

Nancy K. Cox (2000, 2003) 
BA, UNC-Greensboro 

Craig O. Thomas (2003, 2003) 
BS, Alfred; MS, Syracuse 

Legal Department 

J. Reid Morgan (1979, 2002) 
BA, JD, Wake Forest 

Donna H. Hamilton (1988, 1988) 
AB, Drury; JD, Wake Forest 

Anita M. Conrad (1999, 2006) 
BA, Akron; JD, Wake Forest 



Dina J. Marty (2001, 2006) 
BA, Drake; JD, Wake Forest 

K. Carter Cook (2004, 2004) 
BS, MBA, JD, Wake Forest 



Director of Institutional Research 
and Academic Administration 

Associate Director of 
Institutional Research 

Assistant Director of Institutional Research 



Vice President for Investments and Treasurer 

Assistant Treasurer — Trusts 

Assistant Treasurer — Endowment 



Vice President and General Counsel and 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees 

Counsel 



Counsel and Assistant Secretary of the Board of Trustees 

Associate Counsel 
Assistant Counsel 



ADMINISTRATION 



312 



Libraries 

Lynn Sorensen Sutton (2004, 2004) 

AB, MLS, Michigan; PhD, Wayne State 

Marian F. Parker (1999, 1999) 
BA, UNC-Greensboro; 
MSLS, UNC-Chapel Hill; JD, Wake Forest 

E. Parks Welch III (1991, 2000) 

BS, UNC-Chapel Hill; MBA, Wake Forest; 
MLS, UNC-Greensboro 

Registrar 

Dorothy A. Sugden (1987, 1999) 

BA, Salem College; MA, Wake Forest 

Donna K. Haley (2002, 2002) 

BS, Mercer; MBA, Georgia College & State 

Student Life 

Kenneth A. Zick (1975, 1989) 

BA, Albion; JD, Wayne State; MLS, Michigan 

Harold R. Holmes (1987, 1988) 
BS, Hampton; MBA, Fordham 

Mary T. Gerardy (1985, 1993) 

BA, Hiram; MEd, Kent State; MBA, Wake Forest; 
MA, PhD, The Fielding Graduate Institute 

Charlene A. Cerutti (2007, 2007) 
BA, Pittsburgh (fohnstown); 
MA, Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

James R. Buckley (1996, 2001) 
BS, MEd, Clemson 

Timothy L. Auman (2003, 2003) 
BA, Wofford College; MDiv, Duke 

Rebecca G. Hartzog (1999, 1999) 
BA, Samford; 
MDiv, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 

WUHam C. Currin (1988, 1988) 

BA, Wake Forest; BD, Southeastern Baptist Theo. Seminary 

Carolyn A. Couch (1992, 2001) 

BS, Meredith College; MA, Appalachian State 

Barbee Myers Oakes (1989, 1995) 

BS, MA, Wake Forest; PhD, Tennessee 

Donna McGalliard (2000, 2006) 

BA, NC State; MEd, UNC-Greensboro; 
EdD, Florida State 

David Clark (2003, 2006) 
BA, MEd, Georgia 

Steve Hirst (2005, 2005) 
BA, MEd, Texas Tech 



Director of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library 

Director of the Professional Center Library 
and Professor of Law 

Director of the Coy C. Carpenter Library 



Registrar 

Associate Registrar and 
Registrar of the Divinity School 



Vice President for Student Life 
and Instructional Resources 

Associate Vice President and 
Dean of Student Services 

Associate Vice President for Student Life 



Associate Dean and Judicial Officer 

Director of the Benson University Center 

University Chaplain 

Associate Chaplain /Baptist Campus Minister 

Director of Career Services 

Associate Director of Career Services 

Director of Multicultural Affairs 

Director of Residence Life and Housing 

Assistant Director of Operations 
Director of Greek Life 



313 



ADMINISTRATION 



Melinda Renew (2003, 2006) 

BA, NC State; MEd, Florida Southern College 

Denise J. Williard (2000, 2005) 

BS, Mississippi College; MS, Mississippi State 

Michael Ford (1981, 1988) 

BA, Wake Forest; MDiv, Gordon-Conwell Theo. Seminary 

Andrea C. Ellis (2005, 2005) 

BA, Eastern Michigan; MAEd, Wake Forest 

Cecil D. Price (1991, 1991) 
BS, MD, Wake Forest 

Sylvia T. Bell (1981, 1988) 

RNC, N.C. Baptist Hosp. School of Nursing 

Natascha L. Romeo (1990, 1990) 

BS, South Carolina; MEd, UNC-Greensboro 

Regina G. Lawson (1989, 1992) 

BS, UNC-Wilmington 

Kenneth W. Overholt (1994, 1994) 

BS, Michigan State; MA, Central Michigan 

Marianne A. Schubert (1977, 1986) 

BA, Dayton; MA, PhD, Southern Illinois 

Johnne W. Armentrout (1982, 1989) 

BA, William and Mary; MAEd, Wake Forest 

Van D. Westervelt (1998, 1998) 
BS, Maryland (College Park); 
MA, UNC-Chapel Hill; MS, Duke; PhD, UNC-Chapel Hill 



Assistant Director of Residence Life 

Assistant Director of Marketing and Assessment 

Director of Student Development 

Assistant Director of Student Development 
and Volunteer Services 

Director of Student Health Service 

Associate Director for Administration, 
Student Health Service 

Health Educator 



,. _ Chief of University Police 

Assistant Chief of University Police 

Director of University Counseling Center 

Assistant Director of University Counseling Center 

Director of Learning Assistance Center 



Michael P Shuman (1997, 1997) 
BA, Furman; MEd, South Carolina 



Assistant Director of Learning Assistance Center 



Summer Session 

Toby A. Hale (1970, 1997) 

BA, Wake Forest; MDiv, Duke; EdD, Indiana 

University Advancement 

James R. Bullock (1985, 2006) 
BA, MBA, Wake Forest 

Robert T. Baker (1978, 1991) 

BA, MS, George Peabody (Vanderbilt) 

Kenneth S. Bennett (1997, 1997) 
BA, William and Mary 

Betsy Chapman (1999, 1999) 
BA, MA, Wake Forest 

Cathy B. Chinlund (1986, 1998) 
BS, East Carolina 

Emily Cockerham (2000, 2000) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Melissa N. Combes (1996, 2006) 

BA, Washington College; MBA, Wake Forest 



Dean of Summer Sessions 
and Associate Dean of the College 



Vice President for University Advancement 

Assistant Vice President and Director of Development 

University Photographer 

Director of Alumni and Parent Programs 

Director of Advancement Records and 
Technology Operations 

Associate Director of the College Fund 

Assistant Vice President 
and Director of Principal Gifts 



ADMINISTRATION 



314 



Kevin P. Cox (1990, 1998) 

BA, Texas A&M Commerce; MA, Wake Forest 

Jemiifer E. Craver (2005, 2005) 
BA, UNC-Chapel HiU 

David Davis (1998, 1998) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Vada Lou Earle (1999, 1999) 

BA, Wake Forest; MS, Russell Sage College 

Mary Margaret Evaris (2005, 2005) 
BA, Missouri 

Anne K. Hodges (1987, 1999) 

Jennifer Hudson (2006, 2006) 
BA, MPA, UNC-Greensboro 

Kerry M. King (1989, 2001) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Holly H. Marion (2004, 2004) 

BA, East Carolina; MA, UNC-Charlotte 

Jacob McConnico (2002, 2002) 
BA, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Brad McHwain (1999, 1999) 
BA, Guilford 

Kimberly McGrath (2004, 2006) 
BA, Loyola College (Maryland) 

Minta A. McNaUy (1978, 1997) 
BA, Wake Forest 

KeUy Meacham (2003, 2003) 
BS, Wake Forest 

Cameron Meador (2003, 2003) 
BA, MAEd, Wake Forest 

Robert D. Mills (1972, 1997) 
BA, MBA, Wake Forest 

Allen H. Patterson Jr. (1987, 1987) 
BS, Wake Forest 

Cherin C. Poovey (1987, 2003) 
BA, UNC-Chapel Hill 

Jennifer Richwine (1999, 1999) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Sherry Simmons (2006, 2006) 
I BFA, Savannah College of Art and Design 

Jessie Lee Smith (2006, 2006) 
BA, Wake Forest 

WiUiam T. Snyder (1989, 2006) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Loyd Wade Stokes Jr. (1997, 1997) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Cheryl V. Walker (1989, 1998) 
BA, Wake Forest 



Assistant Vice President of Public Affairs and 
Director of Media Relations 

Assistant Director of MBA Development 
and Alumni Relations /Babcock School 

Technical Development Manager 

Travel and Reunion Director 

Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations 

Director of Campaign Administration 

Assistant Director of Development and 
Alumni Relations/School of Law 

Associate Director of Creative Services 

Director of Development and Alumni Relations/ 

School of Law 

Media Relatioris Officer 

Major Gifts Officer 

Web Content and Bulletins Editor 

Assistant Vice President and Director of 
Alumni Activities and Volunteer Programs 

Director of Wake Forest Clubs 

Director of Gift Stewardship 

Associate Vice President of University Advancement 

Director of Planned Giving 

Assistant Vice President and Director of Creative Services 

Director of Special Events and Coristituent Relations 

Graphic Designer 

Assistant Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations 

Assistant Vice President and 
Director of Advancement Technologies 

Director of Development/Divinity School 
Associate Director of Media Relations 



315 



ADMINISTRATION 



Lloyd A. Whitehead (1995, 1998) 
BA, Central Florida 

Tammy Wiles (1991, 1998) 
BS, High Point 

Wake Forest University Theatre and Dance 

John E. R. Friedenberg (1988, 1998) 

BA, Wake Forest; MFA, Carnegie-Mellon 

R. Trevor Anderson (2002, 2002) 
BA, Lynchburg College 

Nina Maria Lucas (1996, 1996) 
BFA, Ohio State; MFA, UCLA 

Leslie Collins (2001, 2001) 

Lisa Weller (1993, 1993) 

BFA, NC School of the Arts """' 

Other Administrative Offices 

C. Kevin Bowen (1994, 1996) 

BS, Tennessee Tech; MM, Louisville; PhD, Florida State 

Paul Bright (2004, 2004) 
BFA, South Carolina 

Victor Faccinto (1978, 1978) 

BA, MA, California State (Sacramento) 

Mark E. Good (1995, 2005) 
BS, MBA, Wake Forest 

Brian Gorelick (1984, 1984) 

BA, Yale; MM, Wisconsin (Madison); DMA, Illinois 

R. Kent Greer (2001, 2001) 
BA, MA, Baylor 

Thomas K. Heam Jr. (1983, 1983) 

BA, Birmingham-Southern; BD, Southern 
Baptist Theo. Seminary; PhD, Vanderbilt 

Peter D. Kairoff (1988, 1995) 

BA, California (San Diego); MM, DMA, Southern California 

Doris A. McLaughlin (2000, 2000) 

BS, NC Cenh-al; MPA, UNC-Charlotte 

Matt Pack (2007, 2007) 

BA, Kentucky Wesleyan College; MA, Murray State 

Paul N. Orser (1989, 1998) 

BS, Wake Forest; MS, PhD, Emory 

Lillian Shelton (1985, 1998) 
BA, St. Andrews College 

Martine Sherrill (1985, 1989) 
BFA, MLS, UNC-Greensboro 

Ross Smith (1984, 1984) 
BA, Wake Forest 

Leigh Hatchett Stanfield (1999, 1999) 
BA, Wake Forest 



Director of Electroruc Communication 

Assistant Director of Advancement Records and 
Technology Operations 



Director of the University Theatre 

Technical Director 

Director of Dance 

Audience Services Coordinator 
Costume Studio Supervisor 

Director of Bands 

Assistant Gallery Director 

Director of the Hanes Art Gallery 

Associate Compliance Officer 

Director of Choral Ensembles 

International Student and Scholar Adviser 

President Emeritus 

Coordinator of the Venice Program 

Director of Equal Opportunity 

Director of Conference and Guest Services 

Coordinator of the London Program 

Director of the Secrest Artists Series 

Visual Resources Librarian 
and Curator of Print Collection 

Debate Coach 
Assistant Director, Study Abroad 



ADMINISTRATION 3^5 



Stephen Whittington (2002, 2002) Director of the Museum of Anthropology 

AB, Chicago; MA, PhD, Perm State 

Pia Christina Wood (1999, 1999) Director of International Studies 

BA, William and Mary; MIBS, South Carolina; 
MA, New Mexico; PhD, Graduate Institute for International 
Studies (Geneva, Switzerland) 



317 



ADMINISTRATION 



Index 




Abbreviations, in course descriptions 69 

Academic Adviser 28 

Academic Probation 32 

Academic Standing 33, 34 ''■ 

Accountancy 258 

Accreditation, University 11 

Additional Requirements, for graduation 64 

Administration 305 

Admission Requirements 

Undergraduate school 19 

Wayne Calloway School of 

Business and Accountancy 258 
Admission Application Fee 24 
Admission, early decision 20 
Admission Deposit 20, 24 
Advanced Placement 20 
Advising 28 
Aid Programs 55 
American Ethnic Studies 70 
Annenberg Fonim 7 
Anthropology 72 
Application, for admission 19 
Arabic 97 
AROTC 185 
Art 76 

Art History Courses Tl 
Attendance, class 29 
Auditing Courses 30 
Austria, study abroad 58 



B 



Babcock Graduate School of Management 7 
Basic Requirements, for graduation 61, 62 
Beijing 59 

Benin, study abroad 58 
Benson University Center 7 
Beta Gamma Sigma 261 
Biochemistry 92,200 
Biology 83 
Biophysics 92,200 
Board of Trustees 7, 13, 302 
Board of Visitors 303 
Wayne Calloway School of 

Business and Accountancy 304 
Brendle Recital Hall 8 
Business 257 



Cable Television Service 9 

Calendar 28 

Campus Computer Network 8 

Carillon 7 

CarswellHall 7 

Casa Artom 7, 59 

Center for International Studies 58, 66 

Charlotte and Philip Hanes Gallery 8 

Chemistry 90 

China, study abroad 59 

Chinese 111 

Chronological History of Wake Forest 18 

Classical Languages 94 

Classical Studies 94 

Classics 97 

Classification 29 

Class Excuses 28 

Combined Degrees in Medical Technology 67 

Committees of the Faculty 298 

Committee on Academic Affairs 16, 29, 30, 32, 

33, 66, 298 
Committee on Admissions 19, 298 
Common Application 19 
Communication 98 
Commuters 23 
Complaints, by students 16 
Computer Science 103 
Computing PoKcy Information 
and Policy Updates 16 
Computing Responsibilities 15 
Computing Rights 15 
Confidentiality 28 
Core Requirements , for graduation 61, 62 

health and exercise science 64 

restrictions in selecting 64 
Cotonou 58 
Counseling 107 
Courses of Instruction 

Undergraduate School 69 

Wayne Calloway School of 

Business and Accountancy 261 
Course Approval, study abroad 60 
Coy C. Carpenter Library 10 
Cuba, Stijdy Abroad 59 
Cultural Diversity Requirement 64 
Cultural Resource Preservation 107 



318 



Dance 244,249 

Deacon Dollars 23 

Dean's List 32 

Dean of Student Service, office of 15 

Declaring a Major 64 

Degrees Offered 61 

Deposit, for admission 20 

Descriptions of Course Offerings 69 

DeTamble Auditorium 8 

Dining 23 

Directed Reading 35 

Disabilities, students with 20 

Disciplinary Actions 

Information Systems 16 
Divinity School 7 

Divisional Requirements, for graduation 61, 63 
Double Majors 66 

Drop/Add of Partial-Semester Courses 30 
Dropping a Course 30 



E-mail Account 15 

Early Christian Studies 108 

Early Decision 20 

East Asian Languages and Cultures 109 

East Asian Studies 114 

Economics 115 

Education 119 

Elementary Teaching Licensure 121 

Emeriti 293 

Engineering 67 

England, study abroad 59 

English 125 

Enrollment 301 

Ensemble 191 

Entrepreneurship and 

Social Enterprise Minor 132 
Environmental Science 135 
Envirorunental Studies 137 
Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act 12 
Examinations 31 
Exchange Programs 55 
Expenses 22 



Faculty Listings 269 
Fees 

admission application 24 

improper check in /checkout 24 

individual music instruction 24 

library 24 

lock core change 24 

non-WFU study abroad programs 24 

returned checks 24 

room change 24 



FilmShjdies 138 
Finance 257 
Financial Aid 

federal 36, 54 

institutional 36 

outside assistance 56 

refunds 24 
Financial and Accounting Services, 

office of 25, 29 
First- Year Seminar 62, 255 
Flow House 7, 58 
Foreign Area Studies 58, 66 

Italian studies 170 

Spanish 244 
Foreign Language Placement 62 
France, study abroad 59 
French 222,224 



German 139 

German Measles Vaccine 21 

German Studies 140 

Global Trade and Commerce Studies 144 

Goverrung and Advisory Boards 302 

Grade of I 31 

Grade Points 31 

Grading 31, 33 

Graduate Record Examination 66 

Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 7 

Graduation Distinctions 32 

Graylyn International Conference Center 7 

Graz, study abroad 142 

Greek 94, 95 

H 

Harold W. Tribble Hall 8 

Health and Exercise Science 145 

Health Information Summary Form 21 

Health Insurance 28 

Health Policy and Administration 149 

Health Problems 33 

Health Professions Program 91 

Hepatitis B 22 

Higher Education Act 12 

Hiratsuka, study abroad 59 

History 150 

History and Development 17 

Honors Study 57 

Honor and Ethics Council 14, 16, 300 

Honor and Ethics System 14, 31, 32 

Housing 8,27 

Housing Policy, off-campus living 27 

Humanities 157 

Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine 22 



319 



Immunization Policy 21 
Improper Check In/Out Fee 24 
Inclement Weather 28 
Incomplete Grade 31 
Individual Instruction Music Fees 24 
Information Systems 8 

building 8 

disciplinary acHons 16 

privacy 15 

systems monitoring 15 
Institutional Review Board 300 
Intensive Summer Language Institute 224 
Interdisciplinary Honors 162 
Interdisciplinary Minors 66 

American ethnic studies 70 

cultural resource preservation 107 

Early Christian studies 108 

East Asian studies 114 

entrepreneurship and social enterprise 132 

environmental sciences 135 

environmental studies 137 

film studies 138 

global trade and commerce Studies 144 

health policy and administration 149 

humanities 157, 164 

international development and policy 164 

international studies 165 

Latin- American studies 174 

linguistics 176 

medieval studies 183 

neuroscience 194 

Russian and East European studies 239 

urban studies 251 

women's and gender studies 252 
International Development and Policy 164 
International Students 58 
International Studies 58, 165 
Internship Courses 35 
Italian 223, 227 
Italian Studies 170 
Italy, study abroad 59 



James R. Scales Fine Arts Center 8 
Japan, study abroad 59 
Japanese 113 
Journalism 172 
Judicial Council 15, 300 

K 

Kenneth D. Miller Center 8 
Kentner Stadium 8 
KirbyHall 8 



Languages Across the Curriculum 187 
Latin 94,96 
Latin-American Studies 174 

five-year cooperative program 67 
Learning Assistance Center 20, 33 
Libraries 10 
Library Fees 24 
Linguistics 176 
Loans 55 

Lock Core Change Fee 24 
London, study abroad 59 

M 

Majors 

accountancy 258 

anthropology 72 

art history 11 

biology 83 

business 257 

chemistry 91 

Chinese 109 

classical studies 94 

communication 98 

computer science 103 

economics 115 

education 119 

English 125 

finance 257 

French 222 

German 139 

German studies 140 

Greek 94 

health and exercise science 146 

history 150 

Japanese 109 

Latin 94 

mathematical business 179,257 

mathematical economics 116, 179 

mathematics 178 

music in liberal arts 187 

music performance 187 

philosophy 195 

physics 199 

political science 203 

psychology 210 

religion 214 

Russian 140,143 

sociology 240 

Spanish 222 

studio art 11 

theatre 244 
Major, requirements 65 
Manchester Athletic Center 8 
Manchester Hall 8 
Mathematical Business 179 
Mathematical Economics 116, 179 



320 



Mathematics 178 

Meals 23 

Measles Vaccine 21 

Medieval Studies 183 

Meningococcal Vaccine 22 

Mexico, study abroad 59 

Middle East and South Asia Studies 184 

Military Science 185 

Minors 66 

anthropology 72 

art history 77 

biology 84 

chemistry 91 

Chinese 110 

classical studies 95 

communication 99 

computer science 104 

dance 249 

economics 116 

education 121 

English 126 

French 222 

German 139 

German studies 140 

Greek 94 

history 150 

Italian 223 

Japanese 110 

journalism 172 

Latin 94 

mathematics 178 

Middle East and South Asia studies 184 

music 188 

philosophy 196 

physics 200 

political science 204 

professional education 121 

psychology 210 

religion 214 

Russian 140 

sociology 240 

Spanish 222 

statistics 178 

studio art 77 

theatre 245 

women's and gender studies 252 
Motor Vehicle Registration 24 
MSA Program 259 
Mumps Vaccine 21 
Museum of Anthropology 8 
Music 187 

Music in Liberal Arts 187 
Music Performance 187 
Music Performance Study 192 

N 

Near Eastern Languages and Literature 220 
Neuroscience 194 



Non-Wake Forest Study Abroad Fee 24 
Not Reported Grade 31 



Off-Campus Housing Policy 27 
Olin Physical Laboratory 8 
Online Health Information 28 
Open Curriculum 57, 63 
Orientation 28 



Part-time Students 29 
Pass/Fail 31 
Philosophy 195 
Physics 199 
Polio Vaccine 21 
Political Science 203 
Portuguese 230 
Privacy 

Grades 32 

Information Systems 15 

Medical Information 28 
Probation 32 

Professional Center Library 10 
Professional Education, minor 121 
Proficiency in the Use of English 64 
Program of Integrated Education 238 
Psychology 210 



Quantitative Reasoning Requirement 64 
Queretaro, study abroad 59 

R 

Readmission 33 

Recognition, University 11 

Recognized Majors 65 

Refund of Charges Policy 25 

Registrar, office of 32 

Registration 28 

Religion 214 

Religious Observances, and class attendance 30 

Repetition of Courses 32 

Requirements for Continuation 33 

Requirements for Degrees 61 ' 

Residence Life and Housing 

dorm options 8 

office of 27 
Resident Technology Advisors 10 
Retention of Medical Records 28 
Returned Check Fee 24 

Return of Non-Title IV Program Funds Policy 26 
Return of Title IV Program Funds Policy 25 
Reynolda Campus 7 
Reynolda Gardens 7 



321 



ReynoldaHall 7 

Reynolda House Museum of American Art 7 

Reynolda Village 7 

Romance Languages 222 

Room Change Fee 24 

Room Charges 22 

Rubella (German Measles) 21 

Rubeola (Measles) 21 

Russian 139 

Russian and East European Studies 239 



Salamanca, study abroad 60, 236 
Salem Hall 8 
Sanskrit 221 
Scholarships 36 

School of Law 7 

Secondary Teaching Licensure 120 

Semester in France 227 

Semester in Venice 230 

Semester or Year in Spain 236 

Senior Testing 66 

Sociology 240 

Spain, study abroad 60 

Spanish 222, 230 

Spanish Studies 244 

Statement of Purpose 13 

Statistics 178 

Students with Disabilities 20 

Student Complaints 16 

Student Employment 56 

Student Financial Aid, Office of 26 

Student Health Service 27 

Student Teaching, for education majors 120 

Studio Art Courses 80 

Study Abroad 58 

eligibility 35 

non-Wake Forest programs 60 
Study at Salem College 57 
Summer Study 34 
Suspension 33 
Systems Monitoring 15 



Teacher Licensure 119 

Telephone Service 9 

Tetanus and Diphtheria Vaccine 21 

Theatre and Dance 244 

Title IV Funds 25 

Transcripts 32 



Transfer Credit 34 
Transfer Students 20 
Tuberculin Skin Test 22 
Tuition 22 
Tuition Deposit 24 

u 

Undergraduate Admissions, office of 19 
Undergraduate Faculties 269 
Undergraduate Schools 11 
University 

governance 7 

history 6 

history and development 17 

honor system 14 
University Counseling Center 34 
University Senate 300 
Urban Studies 251 

V 

Varicella Vaccine 22 
Venice, study abroad 59, 230 
Veterans Benefits 56 
Vierma, study abroad 58, 142 

w 

Wait Chapel 7 
Wake Forest College 

statement of purpose 13 
Wake Forest Information Network (WIN) 9 
Wake Forest School of Medicine 7 
Wayne Calloway School of 

Business and Accountancy 7, 11, 65, 256 
William B. Greene Jr. Hall 8 
William N. Reynolds Gymnasium 8 
WIN 9 

WingateHall 7 
Winston Hall 8 
Withdrawal 25 

Withdrawal from Wake Forest University 30 
Women's and Gender Studies 252 
Worrell House, study abroad 7, 59 
Worrell Professional Center for 

Law and Management 8 
Writing Courses 127 



Z. Smith Reynolds Library 7, 9, 10 



322 



Notes 



323 



NOTES 



Notes 



324 



Notes 



325 



Notes 



NOTES 326 



Notes 



^ 



327 



NOTES 



The Bulletins of Wake Forest 



the undergraduate bulletin is 
published by the office of 
creative services, room 220, 
reynolda hall, reynolda campus, 
kim mcgrath, bulletins editor, 
e-mail: mcgratka@wfu.edu 

The information in this bulletin applies to the 
academic year 2006-2007 and is accurate and 
current, to the extent possible, as of March 23, 
2007. The Uruversity reserves the right to change 
programs of study, academic requirements, 
teaching staff, the calendar, and other matters 
described herein without prior notice, in 
accordance with established procedures. 

Wake Forest University is committed to 
administer all educational and employment 
activities without discrimination because of 
race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, 
veteran status, handicapped status or disability 
as required by law. The University has adopted a 
procedure for the purpose of resolving discrimi- 
nation complaints. Inquiries or concerns should 
be directed to Harold Holmes, dean of student 
services, at (336) 758-5226; dean of the College, 
at (336) 758-5312; or Doris McLaughlin, assistant 
director of human resources, director of equal 
employment opportunity, and Title IX coordina- 
tor, at (336) 758-4814. 

In addition, Wake Forest rejects hatred and 
bigotry in any form and adheres to the prin- 
ciple that no person affiliated with Wake Forest 
should be judged or harassed on the basis of 
perceived or actual sexual orientahon. In affirm- 
ing its commitment to this principle, Wake Forest 
does not limit freedom of religious associahon 
or expression, does not presume to control 
the policies of persons or entities not affiliated 
with Wake Forest, and does not extend benefits 
beyond those provided under other policies of 
Wake Forest. 






The Undergraduate Schools 

Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 

P.O. Box 7305 

Winston-Salem, NC 27109-7305 

(336) 758-5201 

The Graduate School 

Dean of the Graduate School 
P.O. Box 7487 

Winston-Salem, NC 27109-7487 
(336) 758-5301 

The School of Law 

Director of Admissions 
PO. Box 7206 

Winston-Salem, NC 27109-7206 
(336) 758-5437 

The Babcock Graduate School 
of Management 

Director of Admissions 
PO. Box 7659 

Winston-Salem, NC 27109-7659 
(336) 758-5422 

The Wake Forest University School 
of Medicine 

Associate Dean for Admissions 
Medical Center Blvd. 
Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1090 
(336) 716-4265 

The Summer Session 

Dean of the Summer Session 
i^.O. Box 7866 

Winston-Salem, NC 27109-7866 
(336) 758-3155 



The Undergraduate Bulletiit is printed in Canada. 



ABOUT THE BULLETINS 323 



WAKE FOREST 

Director of Admissions 
Post Office Box 7305 
Winston-Salem, NC 27109-7305 



Periodicals 
U.S. Postage 
PAID 

Winston-Salem, NC 
USPS 078-320 




Wake Forest University is committed to administer all educational and employ- 
ment activities without discrimination because of race, color, religion, national 
origin, age, sex, veteran status, or disability status, as required by law. In addition. 
Wake Forest rejects hatred and bigotry in any form and adheres to the principle 
that no person affiliated with Wake Forest should be judged or harassed on the 
basis of perceived or actual sexual orientation. In affirming its commitment to 
this principle. Wake Forest does not limit freedom of religious association or 
expression, does not control the policies of persons or entities not affiliated with 
Wake Forest, and does not extend benefits beyond those provided under other 
policies of Wake Forest. The University has adopted a procedure for the purpose 
of resolving discrimination complaints. Inquiries or concerns should be directed 
to: Reynolda Campus, 336.758.4814; Bowman Gray Campus, 336.716.6123. In- 
dividuals with disabilities or special print-related needs may contaa the Learning 
Assistance Center at 335.758.5929 or lacenter@wfij.edu for more information.